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COMPUTE 



VOLUME 16, NUMBER 6, ISSUE 165 



JUNE 1994 



FEATURES 
18 

TEST LAB 

Edited by Mike Hudnali 

We test seven super 

Pentium systems with power 

to burn. 



CHIPS AHOY: THE NEW CPUs 

By Steven J. 

Vaughan-Nichols 

How to choose the CPU 

that's right for you. 

55 

COMPUTE'S GETTING STARTED 
WITH™ PC SOUND 

By Richard 0. Mann 

and David English 

PC do-re-mi's in a nutshell. 

78 

PRODUCTIVITY CHOICE 

By Clifton Karnes 

WinWriter 600 from 

Lexmark. 

COLUMNS 

4 
EDITORIAL LICENSE 

By Clifton Karnes 
Rude Windows programs. 

6 
WINDOWS WORKSHOP 

By Clifton Karnes 
Adding a second hard drive. 

8 
FEEDBACK 

Edited by Robert Bixby 
Answers to tough questions. 

16 

INTRODOS 

By Tony Roberts 
Clean up your CONFIG.SYS. 

34 

PROGRAMMING POWER 

By Tom Campbell 
MicroHelp's HighEdit. 

36 

TIPS & TOOLS 

Edited by 
Richard C. Leinecker 
Tips from our readers. 




Cover photo by Mark Wagoner of an Austin Pentium displaying 
Windows wallpaper from Second Nature. 



40 

HARDWARE CLINIC 

By Mark Minasi 
Replace your 386. 

80 

ONLINE 

By Robert Bixby 
The world through a wire. 

136 

NEWS & NOTES 

By Jill Champion Booth 
Top computer news. 

MULTIMEDIA PC 
65 

FAST FORWARD 

By David English 
Multimedia goes Hollywood. 



66 

SCIENCE-FICTION CD-ROMs 

By Scott A. May 

If you're interested in 

software that packs the 

future on a CD-ROM, this is 

the place to get started. 

72 

NEW MULTIMEDIA PRODUCTS 

Edited by Polly Cillpann 

Cool new hardware and hot 

new software for your 

multimedia PC. 

76 

MULTIMEDIA SPOTLIGHT 

By Scott A. May 
Rock Rap 'N Roll from 
Paramount Interactive. 



ENTERTAINMENT 
82 

DISCOVERY CHOICE 

By Peter Scisco 

Zurk's Learning Safari from 
Soleil. 

86 

GAME INSIDER 

By Peter Olafson 

TSR and SSI are 

going their separate ways, 

but SSI still has 

plenty of great stuff 

in store. 

88 

ENTERTAINMENT CHOICE 

By Scott A. May 

Gabriel Knight from Sierra. 

90 

GAMEPLAY 

By Denny Atkin 

Hands-on previews of 

MicroProse's hot new F-14 

Fleet Defender flight 

simulator and Interplay's 

medieval multimedia game, 

Castles II CD-ROM. 

92 

TAKE CONTROL 

By Denny Atkin 
The current crop of PC 
game controllers is hot! 

REVIEWS 
101 

Megahertz XJ1 144, 

Corel Ventura 4.2, 

3-D Dinosaur Adventure, 

Archon Ultra, 

Canvas 3.51, 

FontMinder 2.0, 

Sinn Farm, 

PharmAssist, 

Masterclips, 

Electric Reading Land, 

Video Jam, 

NHL Hockey, 

Air Duel, and more. 

ADVERTISERS' INDEX 

See page 121. 



COMPUTE (ISSN 0194-357X) is published monthly in the U.S. and Canada by COMPUTE Publicalions International Ltd , 1965 Broadway New York, NY 10023-5965. Volume 16, Number 
6, Issue 165. Copyright ® 1994 by COMPUTE Publications International Ltd All rights reserved. COMPUTE is a registered trademark of COMPUTE Publications International Ltd. Distributed 
worldwide (except in Australia and the U.K.) by Curtis Circulation Company. P.O. Box 9102, Pennsauken, NJ 08109. Distributed in Australia by Tne Horwitz Group, P.O. Box 306, Cammeray 
NSW 2062 Australia, and in the U.K. by Seymour Press Ltd., Windsor House, 1270 London Rd., Nor bury, London SW1642H England. Second-class postage paid at New York, NY, and at 
additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to COMPUTE Magazine, PO Box 3245, Harlan, IA 51537-3041 (800) 727-6937. Entire contents copyrighted. All rights 
reserved. Nothing may be reproduced in whole or in part without written permission from the publisher. Subscriptions: U.S. and AFO— $19.94 per year, Canada— $32.04 per year, elsewhere — 
$29.94 per year. S;ngle copies: U.S. — $2.95 each. The publisher disclaims all responsibility to return unsolicited matter, and all rights in portions published thereof remain the sole property 
of COMPUTE Publications International Ltd. Letters sent to COMPUTE or its editors become the property of the magazine. Editorial offices are located at 324 W. Wendover Ave.. Ste. 
200, Greensboro, NC 27408. (910) 275-9809 



Printed in the U.S. by R. R. Donnelley & Sons Inc. 
2 COMPUTE JUNE 1994 



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Circle Reader Service Number 125 



Editor Clifton Karnes 
Art Director Robin Case Mykytyn 

EDITORIAL 
Managing Editor David English 
Features Editor Robert Bixby 
Reviews Editor Mike Hudnail 
Gazette and Online Editor Tom Netsef 
Entertainment Editor Denny Atkin 
Senior Copy Editor Karen Huffman 

Copy Editor Margaret Ramsey 
Editorial Assistant Polly Cilipam 
Contributing Editors Sylvia Graham, Tony Roberts, 
Karen Siepak 

ART 
Assistant Art Director Kenneth A. Hardy 
Designer Katie Murdock 
Copy Production Manager Terry Cash 

PRODUCTION 

Production Manager De Potter 

Traffic Manager Barbara A. Williams 

PROGRAMMING AND ONLINE SERVICES 
Manager Tray Tucker 
Programmers Sherman Brown 
Steve Draper 
Bradley M. Smal. 

ADMINISTRATION 



President and COO 

Executive Vice President, 

Operations 

Vice President 

and Editorial Director 

Operations Manager 

Office Manager 

Sr. Administrative Assistant 

Receptionist 



Kathy Keeton 
William Tynan 

Keith Ferre!) 

David Hensley Jr 
Sybil Agee 
Julia Fleming 
LeWanda Fox 



ADVERTISING 
Vice President Peter T Johnsmeyor 
and Associate Publisher (212) 496-6100 

ADVERTISING AND MARKETING 

Full -Page and Standard Display Ads; East Coast -Peter T Johns- 
meyeror Chris Coelho, COMPUTE Publications International, 1965 
Broadway. New York, NY 10023; (212) -196-6100. Southeast- 
Harriet Rogers, 503 A St SE Wasnrr.gion, DC ZZZ 03, (202) 546- 
5926. Florida -Jay M Remer Associates, 7040 W Palmetto Park 
Rd.. Sie 308 Bcca Raton F L 33433; (407) 391-0104. (4071 391- 
5074 (fax). M.dwes' Starr Lane, 7 May wood Dr.. Danville. IL 
6 1 832; (217) 443-4042. (217) 443-4043 (fax). Midwest Main Office— 
111 E. Wacker Dr S f o. 508, Chicago, IL 60601; (312) 819-0900, 
(312) 819-0813 (fax). Detroit Jim Chauv<n. 200 E Big Beaver Rd., 
Troy, Ml 48083; (313) 680-4610, (313) 524-2866 (fax). Northwest— 
Jerry Thompson (415-348-8???) or Lue ■ e Dennis (707-451-8209), 
Jules E. Thompson Co , 1290 Howard Ave., Ste 303, Buriingame. 
CA 94010 Southwest and West— Howard Berman. 67 28 Eton Ave 
Caroga Park CA 91303; (818j 992-4777 Prcduct Man Ads; Lu- 
cj g Dermis, Jules E. Thompson Co. 1290 Howard Ave Ste. 303. 
Bunngame, CA 9401H- (7071 451-8209. Classified Ads Mara 
Manasen, 1 Woods Cl.. Huntington. NY 11743; (516) 757-9562 
(phone and fax). Sr VP/Corp. Dir., New Business Development; Bev- 
eriy Wardale VP/Ct , Group Advertis ; ng Sales: Nancy Kestenbaum, 
9709 Brimfeld Ct . Potomac, MD 20854; (301) 299-4677. (301) 299- 
4649 (fax). Sr. VP/Southern and Midwestern Advertising Dr : Pe- 
ter Go!dsmith, P.O. Box 1535, Mason Neck, VA 22199-1535; (703) 
339-1060, (703) 339-1063 (fax) Europe -Beverly Wardaie, Flat 2, 
10 Stafford Texaco, Londc" England W87 BH; 011-4711-937- 
1517. Japan— Jiro Semba. Intergroup Comm^ncai.ons. 3F T;ger 
Bldg., 5-22 Sniba-koen, 3-Chome Minato ku, Tokyo 105. Japan, 
03-434-2607, J25469IGLTYO (telex), 434-5970 (lax). Korea: Kaya 
Advertising, Rm. 402 Kunshm Annex B/D 2b 1-1, Dohwa Dong, 
Mapo-Ku. Secu:, Korea (121); 719-6906, K32144Kayaad (telex). 

THE CORPORATION 

Bob Guccione, Chairman and CEO 

Kathy Keeton. Vice Chairman and COO 

William F. Marlieb, President (Marketing. Sales, and Circulation) 

Patrick J. Gavin, Executive Vice President (Operations) and CFO 

Richard Cohen, Executive Vice President and Treasurer 

Frank DeVino, Executive Vice President and Graphics Director 

Jim Martise, Executive Vice President (Circulation) 

Hal Halpner, Vice President and Manufacturing Director 

William Tynan, Vice President (Technology and Information 

Services) 

CORPORATE ADMINISTRATION 

Sr. VP and CFO: Patrick J. Gavin; VP and Dm Sales Promotions: 
Beveriy Greiper; D.r., Ne.vssiand Cremation; Maureen Shai'key. Dir,, 
Newsstand Opera? ons Jr.? Gallo; Dir., Subscription Circulation: 
Bealrice J Hanks, VP and Dir., Research; Robert Patine 1 " Adver- 
tising Production Dir.: Charlene Smith; Traffic Dir. William Harbutt; 
VP, F'nanciai Operations: Jim Folio, VP, Budget and Finance. Tom 
Maley; Production Mgr .. Tom Stinson; Asst Production Mgr. Nan- 
cy Rice; Mgr., International Div George Rojas; VP. Retail Sales and 
Marketing: Gienn Srr':^ National Marketing D ; r ■ Anne M Z'-nk; Ex- 
ec. Asst. to Bob Guccione. Diane O'Conne Spec. Asst. to Bob 
Guccione: Jane Homlish 



EDITORIAL LICENSE 



Clifton Karnes 



've had it with rude, crude, and so- 
cially unattractive Windows pro- 
grams. You know the ones I'm talk- 
ing about. They install themselves 
all over your hard disk, polluting your 
WIN. INI with entries, filling your WIN- 
DOWS and SYSTEM directories with 
files, and sometimes even defiling 
your root directory. They're impossi- 
ble to move or delete, so I've decid- 
ed to complain. 

What I'm going to do is give devel- 
opers six golden rules for Windows 
programs. It's worth mentioning that 
I'm looking at this problem from the 
point of view of both a user and a pro- 
grammer. And I have to tell you that 
I've sinned myself. As a programmer, 
I've broken most of these rules, but 
the end user inside has turned me 
around. I've seen the light, and I will 
sin no more. So here's the law, from 
one of the converted. 

1. Don't place files in any directo- 
ry except your program's own direc- 
tory and subdirectories. This is by far 
the most important rule. Not only 
should all your files go in your pro- 
gram's directory and subdirectories, 
but all your INI files should go there 
as well and not'm the WINDOWS sub- 
directory. If you have several sepa- 
rate programs that will be installed in 
different subdirectories and that 
need to share DLLs, put them in a di- 
rectory you own, and mark the loca- 
tion with an environment variable so 
your other programs will know where 
to find them. 

2. Don't add entries to WIN. INI. 
Use your own INI file, and place it in 
your program's directory. 

3. Include explicit instructions for 
the user on how to uninstall your pro- 
gram manually. If you've followed 
rules 1 and 2, uninstalling will simply 
be a matter of deleting the program's 
directory and all its subdirectories. 

4. If your application puts files in 
any directory other than its own (and 
following rules 1 and 2, it shouldn't), 
include an uninstall program. 

5. If possible, keep hard-wired ref- 
erences to directories your program 
uses out of INI files. This may be dif- 
ficult, but if you follow all of the rules 
above plus this one, a user not only 
can delete a program easily but can 
move it to another disk by just drag- 



ging the main directory. 

6. Don't require that your pro- 
gram's executables be on the user's 
path. You may suggest this as a con- 
venience, however. 

Those are the golden six, but until 
all developers see the light and start 
following these guidelines, we'll still 
have problems. So what are we sup- 
posed to do? Well, there are several 
commercial programs that help you re- 
move programs. Perhaps the most 
useful is Uninstaller 2 from MicroHelp. 
It looks at your system intelligently to 
determine which files a program is us- 
ing and then zaps them. This tool can 
be dangerous, however, so I recom- 
mend it only to experts. 

Another option is the INI Tracker 
found in The Norton Utilities 8.0. This 
program makes snapshots of your sys- 




tem files and your WINDOWS and 
SYSTEM directories, as well as any 
other directories you tell the program 
to watch. This is a very useful tool. 

My favorite tools, however are two 
tried-and-true batch files I wrote short- 
ly after Windows 3.0 arrived on my 
hard disk, BEFORE.BAT and AF- 
TER. BAT. These programs make a 
snapshot of your system before and af- 
ter you do an install and then compare 
the two snapshots. I've published 
these before in COMPUTE, and I've re- 
cently updated both programs to 
make them faster. If you're interested, 
look for them in B&A.ZIP in COM- 
PUTE'S forum on America On- 
line — they're free. Whatever you do, 
you'll need at least one of these tools to 
do battle against all those inconsiderate 
Windows programs out there. □ 



COMPUTE JUNE 1994 




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500 of the most fascinating species ever 
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And Prehistoria brings these incredible 
creatures to life with such dazzling multi- 
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videos, high-resolution maps, sound, life- 
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WINDOWS WORKSHOP 



Clifton Karnes 



ADD A SECOND 
HARD DRIVE 

Windows programs gobble up 
disk space like there's no to- 
morrow. Realtime compres- 
sion programs such as Stack- 
er and DoubleSpace help a 
lot, but sooner or later, you're 
going to run out of free mag- 
netic media. Then you'll have 
some tough decisions to 
make. If your computer and 
hard disk are both serviceable 
(at least a 386DX computer 
and a hard disk of 100MB), 
the best solution is probably to 
install a second hard disk. 



==>) DoubleSpace Info 


Drive D is stored on uncompressed drive K 
in the file K:\DBLSPACE.Q00. 


Close | 


.. ........ 


'Compressed Drive D ^^^^^^^^ 

■ Space used: 68.64 MB ^^ ^^ 
Compression ratio: 1.5 to 1 

■ Space free: 441.32 MB ^^B Z^^ 
Estimated compression ratio: 1.6 to 1 


| tlelp J 




Total space: 509.97 MB 


| Show Details j 



Even after 

installing a 

number of 

programs, I have 

room to 

spare on my new 

DoubleSpaced 

Western Digital 

340MB drive. 



If the idea of doing some- 
thing like this doesn't turn you 
into a quivering mass of Jell- 
0, you're probably ready to 
dive into your computer. Be- 
fore you do, however, there 
are some things you should 
know about that I discovered 
when I added a second hard 
drive to my system. 

First, I'm talking here about 
upgrading IDE drives. Chanc- 
es are that if you bought your 
system in the last two years, 
you have an IDE drive. For IDE 
drives, you can probably add 
a second drive pretty easily if 
you add a drive by the same 
company. If you add the 
same kind of drive you already 
have, the chances of encoun- 
tering problems are significant- 
ly reduced. 

In my case, my system is a 
Gateway 2000 486DX2-66 
that came with a 340MB Cavi- 
ar IDE drive from Western Dig- 
ital (714-932-4900). This drive 



has given me excellent serv- 
ice in the last year, so decid- 
ing to add an identical drive 
was easy. It's also a good rep- 
resentative choice, because 
Western Digital invented the 
IDE interface, and the 
WD2340 has become an indus- 
try standard (Norton uses this 
drive in its benchmarks). 

Now, on to the upgrading 
story. The first thing to do is 
check with your system maker 
to verify that you can add a sec- 
ond drive. If you can, decide 
on the drive, and you're ready 
to start gathering stuff and 
spending money. In addition 
to the drive, you'll need sever- 
al parts. If you buy a drive up- 
grade kit, these parts may 
come with it. If you simply buy 
a second drive, you'll have to 
find these parts somewhere. If 
your drive is smaller than the 
drive bay it fits into (which is 
the case with the WD2340), 
you'll need a metal bracket to 
hold the drive and from four to 
six screws to attach the drive 
to the bracket. You'll also 
need two plastic guide rails to 
attach to the drive bracket (or 
to the drive itself if it's large 
enough to fit into a drive bay), 
and you'll need four screws to 
attach the guide rails to the 
bracket (or drive). You'll also 
need two jumpers to configure 
the drives as master and 
slave. Your drive cable should 
have a connector for daisy- 
chaining a second drive, but 
if it doesn't, you'll need a new 
cable. 

There are two sources to 
consider for these parts (brack- 
et, guide rails, screws, and 
jumpers). You might try your 
computer manufacturer. It 
may be able to supply these 
at little or no cost. Gateway, 
for example, agreed to send 
all of these parts to me and on- 
ly charged me for shipping 
($9). However, it took three 
weeks for the package to 
reach me, and when it arrived, 
I only had one screw (instead 



of ten) and one jumper (in- 
stead of two). 

A local computer store is al- 
so a good bet. My local Comp- 
USA had all of this stuff avail- 
able for under $10. 

After you have everything 
you need, you can hook up 
the drive. You'll need direc- 
tions for this because the 
drives must be connected on 
the data/control cable in a par- 
ticular order. Next, you need 
to place jumpers on each 
drive to identify it to the system 
correctly. Last, you have to 
plug in a power connector to 
the new drive. If you don't 
have a free one, you need to 
get a Y power plug. 

After you install the hard- 
ware, you need to tell your PC 
about the new hard drive. To 
do this, you have to run your 
computer's setup program 
and configure the drive. If 
you're installing a drive that 
is identical to your first drive, 
you simply copy the informa- 
tion from the first drive to the 
second. 

After setup is configured 
properly and your PC recogniz- 
es the new drive, you need to 
partition it and format it. (In the 
old days, before IDE, you had 
to low-level format the drive 
first.) To partition the drive, 
you run DOS Fdisk. The impor- 
tant thing to remember is that 
you want to create an extend- 
ed DOS partition using the en- 
tire new hard disk. 

After Fdisk finishes, you 
need to format your new hard 
drive with the DOS Format com- 
mand, using the /u option. 
(You don't need to use the /s 
option, unless you're configur- 
ing your new drive to be your 
boot drive.) Next, if you're plan- 
ning to run Stacker or Dou- 
bleSpace on the new drive, do 
it now before you fill the drive 
up with programs. 

That's all there is to it. If eve- 
rything goes smoothly, the in- 
stallation shouldn't take more 
than an hour. □ 



6 COMPUTE JUNE 1994 





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Dept.C6 



FEEDBACK 



Edited by Robert Bixby 



Adding a CLOSE, 

assigning a 

drive, wishing for 

better software, 

finding more 

'Feedback,' 9 avoiding 

young pirates, 

and making a case 

for caddies 



Correction 

The scheduling program pub- 
lished in the April 1994 
"Feedback" will fail without 
the following modification. 
You must insert a line be- 
tween the 14th and 15th 
lines. This line must contain on- 
ly the command CLOSE. 
Here is what the 13th through 
the 19th lines of the program 
should look like. 

SHELL "date > junk.!!! 

<return.!M" 
OPEN "junk.!!!" FOR 

INPUT AS #1 
LINE INPUT #1, a$ 
CLOSE 

SHELL "del junk.!!!" 
SHELL "del return.!!!" 
FOR i = 1 TO 19 STEP 3 

ROBERT BIXBY 
GREENSBORO, NC 

Switching Drives 

I have some old software on 
5 1 /4-inch floppies that has to 
run from the A drive. My new 
computer has a 3 1 /2-inch drive 
as the A drive. Is there a way 
to switch the A and B drives to 
fool my old software? 

ROBERT DELPIZZO 
FLANDERS, NJ 

The Assign command might 
work. To fool your computer in- 
to thinking your B drive is your 
A drive, type assign a b at the 
DOS prompt. This will assign 
the A drive designation to 
your B drive (the B drive will re- 
spond as either A or B). To do 
a complete flip-flop, type as- 
sign b a. Your A drive will re- 
spond as drive B, and your B 
drive will respond as drive A. 
To get things back to normal, 
just type assign. 

Wish List 

Here's what I would like to see: 
a typing tutor for children, a 
word processor for children, ar- 
ticles that combine a BASIC 
type-in program and some elec- 
trical construction using ICs, 
and, finally, interesting things I 



can do with my computer that 
require the application of my in- 
telligence rather than the con- 
tents of my pocketbook. 

HENRY H. FALES 
ORLEANS, MA 

Many software publishers are 
recognizing the special need 
for children's word proces- 
sors (watch the review pag- 
es). It doesn't involve ICs (ex- 
cept for the ones already built 
into your computer), but 
here's a simple typing tutor 
that requires only the cost of 
this magazine and a bit of typ- 
ing. When run, this program 
prompts you for a script file — 
the file containing the text 
that you'll type. You'll have to 
prepare the script yourself. 

This file must be a simple 
ASCII file with a carriage re- 
turn at the end of each line 
(and each line must be under 
80 characters in length). The 
program will read the file line 
by line and display the text 
that you should type. If you 
make a mistake, the program 
will beep. When you reach 
the end of a line, a new line 
will be displayed. If you get 
tired of typing, press Esc to 
end the program. If you quit 
the program or if you reach 
the end of the script, the pro- 
gram will display your typing 
speed in words per minute 
and the number of errors 
you've made. Then it will 
show you your statistics for all 
previous sessions with the pro- 
gram and give you the option 
of seeing a bar graph display- 
ing your speed and errors 
over the past 16 sessions. 

Periodically you might want 
to delete the HIGHSCOR file be- 
cause it could become extreme- 
ly large, and watching your 
scores from hundreds of past 
sessions scroll by could be- 
come tedious, (in this listing, 
as in all program listings in 
COMPUTE, an indented line is 
a continuation of the preced- 
ing line.) 



RANDOMIZE TIMER 

DIM eror(255) 

eror = 0: counter = 0: counter2 = 1 

CLS 

LOCATE 23, 1: PRINT "Press Esc 

to quit." 

INPUT "Name of file to type"; a$ 
CLS 

OPEN a$ FOR INPUT AS #1 
begin = TIMER 
WHILE NOT E0F(1) 
LINE INPUT #1, line$ 
LOCATE counted, 1: PRINT line$ 
FOR i = 1 TO LEN(line$) 
letter$ = MID$(line$, i, 1) 
counter = counter + 1 
waitloop: 
in$ = INKEY$ 
IF in$ = CHR$(27) THEN GOTO 

score 

IF in$ = ""THEN GOTO waitloop 
IF in$ <> letter$ THEN 
eror = eror + 1 
eror(ASC(letter$)) = 

eror(ASC(letter$)) + 1 
BEEP 

GOTO waitloop 
END IF 
LOCATE counter2 + 1,1: PRINT 

in$; 
NEXT 
counter2 = counter2 + 2: IF 

counter2 > 20 THEN counter2 = 1: 

CLS 
WEND 
score: 
CLOSE 
CLS 

sec = INT(TIMER - begin) 
wpm$ = STR$(INT((counter / 5.5) / 

(sec/ 60))) 
wpm$ = RIGHT$(wpm$, 

LEN(wpm$)-1) 
wpm$ = RIGHT$("000" + wpm$, 

3) 

PRINT "You typed"; counter 
PRINT "letters in "; sec; 

" seconds" 
PRINT "for an effective typing 

speed of" 
PRINT wpm$; " word(s) per 

minute." 

PRINT "with"; eror; "error(s)." 
OPEN "highscor" FOR APPEND AS 

#1 
PRINT #1, wpm$; " wpm with "; 

STR$(eror); " errors." 
CLOSE 
SHELL "pause" 



8 COMPUTE JUNE 1994 



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Lessons are automatically 
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using famous quotes, riddles, jokes and even 

Copyright (<- 1993 The Software Toolworks, Inc. All rights reserved. 




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256 Colors 

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1992 Reader's Choice Award from Compute! 
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Circle Reader Service Number 245 

Windows is a trademark of Microsoft Corporation. All products and brands 



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II \< Ill-STVPIN-r. ! 



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You had to walk through three feet of snow just to get to school. They get there on Rollerblade skates. You 
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to answer any of your computing questions. And with litcrallv thousands and thousands of CD-ROM titles currently available (and 
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Circle Reader Service Number 209 



ine. Better Homo and Gardens is a trad.nwk of Meredith Corporation, Intel Inside |. 
Canada) 



isuved trademark of tlie Intel corporal nm. •Certain restrictions and exekiMons apply. Monitors, Katlen p.i 



ks and eertai: 



n opt* 



FEEDBACK 



SHELL "type highscorlmore" 


CLOSE 


39, 479 - (scor * 2)), 0, B 


FOR i = 32 TO 255 


IF counter > 16 THEN schlubfactor 


COLOR 7: LOCATE ((479 - (scor * 


IF eror(i) > 2 THEN 


= (counter - 16) 


2))/ 17), 1 + counter3/8: PRINT 


IFmessage$ = ""THEN 


interval = 16 : counter3 = 


scor 


message$ = "You seem to have 


OPEN "highscor" FOR INPUT AS 


COLOR 4: LOCATE ((479 - (scor * 


trouble with the following 


#1 


2))/17)-1, 1 +counter3/8: 


letter(s):": PRINT message$ 


IF schlubfactor THEN 


PRINT eror 


PRINT CHR$(i) + u "; 


FOR i = 1 TO schlubfactor 


counter3 = counter3 + 40 


END IF 


LINE INPUT #1, a$ 


WEND 


NEXT 


NEXT 


COLOR 7: LOCATE 1,1: PRINT 


PRINT 


END IF 


"Press any key to end program." 


PRINT "Type P for a graph of your 


WHILE NOT EOF(1) 


finalloop: 


progress." 


LINE INPUT #1,a$ 


a$ = INKEY$ 


endloop: 


scor = VAL(MID$(a$, 1, 4)) 


IF a$ = "" THEN GOTO finalloop 


in$ = INKEY$ 


eror = VAL(MID$(a$, 13, 4)) 


END 


IF in$ = " " THEN GOTO endloop 


ccolor = ccolor + 1: IF ccolor > 15 




IF LCASE$(in$) <> "p" THEN END 


THEN ccolor = 1 


More Than Meets the Eye 


CLS : SCREEN 12: counter = 


LINE (counter^, 479)-(counter3 + 


Readers: There's more to COMPUTE 


OPEN "highscor" FOR INPUT AS 


39, 479 - (scor * 2)), ccolor, BF 


than what you're holding in your 


#1 


LINE (counted + 10, 479)-( 


hands. Each month, we have an addi- 


WHILE NOT EOF(1) 


counter3 + 30, 479 - eror), 4, BF 


tional "Feedback" program, a business 


LINE INPUT #1, a$ 


LINE (counter3 + 10, 479)-( 


productivity column, and sometimes 


counter = counter + 1 


counter3 + 30, 479 - eror), 14, B 


even a whole extra feature in the COM- 


WEND 


LINE (counter3, 479)-(counter3 + 


PUTE area on America Online. If you're 



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Circle Reader Service Number 111 
© 1993 MicroProse. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED, 
For IBM-PC/Compatibles. 



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FEEDBACK 



on America Online, press Ctrl-K and 
type compute into the dialog box that 
appears. Then click on OK. It will take 
you to our area, which contains all of 
the material from the magazine— and a 
whole lot more. 

ROBERT BIXBY 
GREENSBORO. NC 

The Naked CD 

Aren't all CD-ROMs manufactured the 
same, and isn't the digital technology 
used to play the CD-ROMs universal? 
Then why can't all CD-ROMs be 
played on the Imagination Machine, 
Panasonic's R*E*A*L, the Sega Gene- 
sis, the PC, the Mac, and so on? 

DAVID LEDFORD 
GASTONIA. NC 

All CD-ROMs (and music CDs, too) are 
manufactured the same way. They all 
have the same capacity they all spin 
the same way, and they're all read 
from the center to the periphery But 
the information contained on the CD is 
very different. A series of bytes de- 
signed to display an image on a PC 
screen would be pure garbage to a Se- 
ga Genesis or a Nintendo CD-ROM sys- 



tem. The individual computer com- 
mands—opcodes and operands — vary 
considerably from one CPU to the 
next. File structures might also vary so 
not only could one system make no 
sense or the data on the disc designed 
for a different system, but it might also 
be unable to find it. 

Student Pirates 

I'm an assistant professor of English lit- 
erature at Eastern Mediterranean Uni- 
versity in North Cyprus. I recently wrote 
a Turbo Basic program that teaches stu- 
dents figures of speech used in English 
poetry. My students use the program un- 
der my supervision and like it very 
much. The snag is that people here 
have no consideration for copyright, and 
if I let just one disk of my program out 
of my sight for a few minutes, then my 
program will be like a rumor traveling 
through the island from one student to 
another. Is there a way to stop users 
from copying the software from the flop- 
py to the hard disk or to another floppy? 

WISAM MANSOLR 
FAMAGUSTA, NORTH CYPRUS 

What a beautiful phrase— "like a rumor 
traveling through the island from one 
student to another." You must be a 
great teacher. Unfortunately there are 



few practical ways to prevent someone 
from copying a program, and they all 
disproportionately inconvenience the le- 
gitimate user and are virtually ignored 
by pirates (or gossips, if you prefer). 
Here are some methods that have 
been used. 

You could supply with the program 
disk a difficult-to-copy sheet of codes 
in, say, silver ink on white paper. Then 
make the program demand a random 
code that can only be obtained from 
the sheet and fail to run unless the cor- 
rect code is entered. 

Using a dongle is another solution. 
Give the program away and let people 
copy it at will, but include code that re- 
quires some electronic device plugged 
into the parallel port— a dongle (named 
for Don Gull, a programmer who was in 
a situation much like yours) — and limit 
the availability of the dongles. 

You could personalize each pro- 
gram you hand out, having it request 
from the user a list of very personal piec- 
es of information — mother's maiden 
name, name of family pet, telephone 
number of a friend, and so forth — that 
would only be known by the person 
who should be using the program. 
Then, whenever the program runs, it 
will operate property only if the right 
information is entered during a prelim- 
inary interrogation. 

All of these systems (except the don- 
gle) are very easily defeated, unfortu- 
nately. If anyone reading this has addi- 
tional suggestions, please send them 
to us at COMPUTE, and welt forward 
them to Dr. Mansour 



Caddy Lack 



A review in the January 1994 COM- 
PUTE states that it's an advantage for 
a CD-ROM drive not to require a cad- 
dy. This makes me (and maybe all ed- 
ucators) nervous. The CD-ROM caddy 
is a requirement around students. The 
$5 or so that a caddy costs is money 
well spent because it prevents the 
disc from being damaged. I always try 
to buy CD-ROM drives that require a 
caddy. 

DON ME INK 
CROFTON, NE 



Do you have a question about hard- 
ware or software? Have you discov- 
ered something that could help other 
PC users? If so, we want to hear from 
you. Write to "Feedback" in care of 
this magazine. Readers whose tetters 
appear in "Feedback" wilt receive a 
free COMPUTE baseball cap white sup- 
plies last. We regret that we cannot 
provide personal replies to technical 
questions. O 



14 



COMPUTE JUNE 1994 



ADVERTISEMENT 

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applications In this review, which can be more 
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PagePlus 1 ability to perfonn process-color 
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PagePlus offers a powerful table editor, text 
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The S59-95 price tag is simply incredible. 
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Recommendations... _° 











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to 




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IS 


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Easy Wbrking Desktop Publisher 


B 


B 


C 


C 


D 


D 


Express Publisher 


B 


C 


C 


C 


D 


D 


FromeMaker 


B 


B 


B 


B 


D 


D 


PageMaker 5.0 @ 


A 


A 


A 


A 


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PagePlus 2.0 @ 


A 


B 


A 


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PFS: Publisher 


B 


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C 


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D 


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Publish It! (TimeWorks) 


C 


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QuarkXPress 


A 


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C 


A 


B 


Ventura Publisher 


B 


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B 


A 


C 


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Quark Xpress handles process 
color better than any other 
| program we tested and Ventura 
Publisher works best for long 
documents. Neither is a DTP 
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something for everybody, we've rated PageMaker 
as the best overall program. It's easy to use, yet 
provides process color separations and 
long-document options such as indices and table 
of contents. PageMaker lets you scan images 
directly into your layouts. You can place and 



manipulate graphics easily, and the stylesheet 
options are strong. It also has excellent 
cross-platform compatibility with the Macintosh 
version of PageMaker. 

Serif's PagePlus is another strong application. 
It's also a terrific bargain. If you're doing short 
document publishing, PagePlus provides 
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has a wealth of options. The lack of automatic 
page numbering and a few other long-document 
features leave it less powerful than PageMaker, 
but at less than 10% of the price, who's quibbling? 



Copyright© 1993 by CMP Publications, Inc., 600 Community Drive, Manhasset, NY 1 1030. Reprinted from Windows Magazine 9/93 with permission. 

Circle Reader Service Number 120 



INTRODOS 



Tony Roberts 



An up-to-date 

system 

is a quicker, 

friendlier, 

more efficient 

system. 



MEMORY THIEVES 
RUN UNDETECTED 

Have you ever looked into 
your refrigerator and found 
something old and unrecogniz- 
able tucked into the back of 
the vegetable crisper? Did 
you hold your nose and won- 
der how something so ancient 
and useless had been al- 
lowed to sit there for so long? 

Recently, my friend Steve 
called, saying he was having 
trouble getting his system set 
up with DOS 6.2. I had him fax 
me his configuration files, and 
what I saw was as horrifying 
as lettuce that had turned 
from a crisp, green head to a 
gooey, brown puddle. 

Steve's main concern was 
that he wasn't getting all of the 
free memory he thought he 
should with DOS 6.2. He had 
tried running MemMaker, and 
that had helped some, but 
there still wasn't enough mem- 
ory to run the programs he 
wanted. 

Steve had upgraded DOS 
as new versions came along, 
but he had done so blindly. 
He hadn't removed the outdat- 
ed relics of the old versions as 
he upgraded to the new soft- 
ware. He was still using the 
CONFIG.SYS and AUTOEX- 
EC.BAT files he had set up 
years ago, and he was wast- 
ing memory as a result. 

The first memory drain was 
found in the CONFIG.SYS file, 
which included the statement 
LASTDRIVE=Z. The LAST- 
DRIVE command allows you 
to specify how many disk 
drive names you will be using. 
The DOS default is five, for 
drives A-E. Each disk drive 
name uses about 100 bytes of 
memory. Steve's LASTDRIVE 
command indicated that he 
wanted to use 26 drive 
names, A-Z. In practice, how- 
ever, drive F is the last drive 
used on his system. By chang- 
ing LASTDRIVE=Z to LAST- 



DRIVER he was able to recov- 
er 2000 bytes of memory. 

The big memory gobblers 
were found in the AUTOEX- 
EC.BAT file, however. 

First, Steve was using the 
Append command at a cost of 
9K. This DOS dinosaur was in- 
troduced back in the DOS 2.x 
era. At that time, hard drives 
were just being introduced, 
and the subdirectory system 
was developed to help users 
keep track of all the files on 
those huge 10MB wonders. 
Software written for earlier ver- 
sions of DOS didn't know how 
to deal with subdirectories. 
Such software assumed the 
current subdirectory was the 
only directory in town. 

The Append command was 
a smoke-and-mirrors trick to al- 
low the old software to see 
past its blind spot and find 
files that resided in other sub- 
directories. Of course, all mod- 
ern software is equipped to 
handle subdirectories, so who 
needs Append? 

Another useless bit of soft- 
ware clogging up Steve's sys- 
tem was Graftabl. This pro- 
gram, which occupied 14K, 
was designed to allow PCs 
with CGA adapters to display 
additional characters while in 
graphics mode. Steve junked 
his CGA adapter and monitor 
years ago. He should have 
stopped running Graftabl at 
the same time. 

Finally, Steve's AUTOEX- 
EC.BAT file was loading the 
DOS Print utility, unnecessar- 
ily bottling up more memory. 
Back in the early 1980s, there 
were times when printing from 
DOS was handy or even nec- 
essary, but today, most folks 
find that printing directly from 
their application software is 
the way to go. 

Altogether, Steve was load- 
ing about 30K in unused, un- 
necessary software. Once he 
cleaned out the prehistoric ar- 
tifacts, he had plenty of room 
to run the software he wanted. 



Steve had arrived at this quan- 
dary because he was afraid to 
make any changes in his con- 
figuration files, fearing that 
he'd ruin something. After all, 
things seemed to be working. 

I've never been a believer 
in the "leave well enough 
alone" philosophy. It's good 
practice to take an occasional 
look at your initialization files to 
see whether there's any fat 
that can be trimmed from 
them. If you don't know a CON- 
FIG. SYS from an AUTOEX- 
EC.BAT, find a spouse, 
friend, or coworker who does. 

If you want to experiment 
on your own, grab a DOS man- 
ual and look up some of the 
suspect commands to find out 
what they do. (First, make an 
emergency boot disk contain- 
ing your existing AUTOEX- 
EC.BAT and CONFIG.SYS 
files.) Once you identify a pos- 
sible memory gobbler, use the 
REM command to make tem- 
porary changes that can be un- 
done easily if necessary. 
When DOS finds the com- 
mand REM (this is short for re- 
mark) at the beginning of 
a line, it ignores the rest of the 
line. If the system behaves 
strangely, you can remove the 
REM, and things will return to 
normal. On the other hand, if 
performance stays the same 
or improves, it's a good bet 
that the command was super- 
fluous and can be deleted. 

DOS commands aren't the 
only programs that cause prob- 
lems. Over the years you may 
have added several terminate- 
and-stay-resident (TSR) utili- 
ties to your system. These pro- 
grams, which stay in the back- 
ground waiting for you to acti- 
vate them with a special key 
combination, can perform a va- 
riety of chores. But once you 
stop using these programs, re- 
move references to them from 
your AUTOEXEC.BAT file, or 
they'll continue to load and oc- 
cupy memory that could be 
used elsewhere. □ 



16 COMPUTE JUNE 1994 



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TEST LAB 



PENTIUM PCs: THE FIRST GENERATION 



Edited by Mike Hudnall 
Reviews by William Harrel 

YFour computer isn't fast 
enough, you say? Before you 
buy a 486, check out one of 
these next-generation speed 
demons. Intel's promise of lightning- 
fast Pentium power has finally ma- 
terialized. These seven workhorses 
are the fastest computers ever to ap- 
pear in Test Lab. Granted, you'll pay 
about twice as much for one of 
these babies as for an equally 
equipped 486-66, but if you need 
to push Windows, OS/2, or another 
graphical user interface to the limit, 
you certainly get what you pay for: 
Pure processing power! Massive stor- 
age! Extensive expansion options! 

OK, So Just What Is a Pentium? 

A Pentium processor is, by all 
rights, nothing more than a 586. In- 
tel changed the name because 
words, unlike numbers, can be 
trademarked. Hence, if and when 
another company comes up with 
comparable technology, that tech- 
nology can't be called Pentium. 

And what a next step it is! This 
is by far the most complex PC 
microprocessor to date. It has 
more than twice as many transis- 
tors as the 486DX2 and a wide 
(64-bit, as compared to the 486's 
32-bit) data path. What this 
means to you is about a 75-per- 
cent performance boost. Howev- 
er, utilizing all this power requires 
some unique system board con- 
figurations. In other words, the 
boards and their various compo- 
nents must be manufactured prop- 
erly. To get the most from the Pen- 
tium chip, your computer must 
have strong hard drive and video 
subsystems. Pentium systems al- 
so perform better with an external 
processor cache. Think of an 
external cache as a fast memory 
chip area where data waits to be 
processed. This is somewhat tech- 
nical, but experts agree that Penti- 
ums run significantly better with 
caches of at least 256K. 

As you will see, correctly con- 
figured Pentiums are hot ma- 
chines, and they are not as expen- 

18 COMPUTE JUNE 1994 



sive as the first releases of 486s, 
which ran well over $5,000. You 
can find a well-equipped Pentium 
for under $3,500, and prices are 
bound to drop with increased com- 
petition. By this time next year you 
can expect 486s to replace 386s 
as entry-level computers, as Pen- 
tiums move into the mainstream. 

Review Criteria 

As you read this, literally hun- 
dreds of Pentium configurations 
are becoming available. The fol- 
lowing configuration is what COM- 
PUTE'S editors consider the mini- 
mum configuration for a Pentium 
system. 

If you shell out the money for 
a computer this powerful, it 
should have enough memory for 
Windows to spread out in, and it 



"Pure 

Processing Power! 

Massive storage! 

Extensive expansion 

options!" 



should anticipate future memory- 
hogging applications (such as 
Windows 4.0). The first require- 
ment for participation in this round- 
up is that the system come with 
16MB of system RAM. In addition 
to memory, you'll also need plen- 
ty of hard drive space. Hence, ven- 
dors were asked to supply sys- 
tems with at least 350MB hard 
drives, and they easily com- 
plied—each of these machines 
comes with at least 450MB of 
hard drive storage. 

If you run graphics applica- 
tions under Windows, you 
already know how slowly some of 
them display on your monitor. 
The sluggishness is due primari- 
ly to a bottleneck where the graph- 
ics adapter meets the mother- 



board bus, which until recently 
had a 16-bit path. Recent local- 
bus technology widens the path 
to 64 bits. There are two types of 
local bus, VESA (Video Electron- 
ics Standards Association) and 
PCI (Peripheral Component Inter- 
connect). PCI is the newer type, 
and once it's perfected, it's expect- 
ed to be superior. All of the 
machines examined here have 
PCI local bus. 

Vendors were also asked to 
supply a 256K external cache. 
Remember that a cache is a 
bank of ultrafast memory chips 
that catch and hold data in antic- 
ipation that the CPU will soon 
need it. Having this data waiting in 
the wings significantly enhances 
performance. Each of the vendors 
supplied a 256K cache. Most of 
the systems here allow you to 
increase the cache size to 512K 
and beyond. A larger cache 
should enhance the performance 
of each of these systems. 

Finally, if you spring for a sys- 
tem with lightning-fast graphics, 
you'll want a good monitor, so 
this roundup required vendors to 
equip their systems with high- 
resolution, 15-inch monitors. All 
complied. In fact, two compa- 
nies, Gateway and MidWest Mi- 
cro, went the extra mile (well, 2 
inches anyway) and sent 17-inch 
displays. The larger monitors 
make text easier to read at high 
resolutions, but overall, the quali- 
ty of the display subsystems that 
ship with all these systems is 
impressive — crisp and clear with 
great colors. 

Speed Thrills 

The first thing power users want 
to know about a group of comput- 
ers is which one is fastest. How- 
ever, to most people, a bench- 
mark point here or there is a moot 
point. As long as the machine 
has sufficient power and isn't sig- 
nificantly slow for its class, a num- 
ber of other issues are more 
important, such as expandability 
and what you get for your mon- 
ey. To evaluate these issues, I 



opened the machines and exam- 
ined the motherboards to find out 
how easily you can install drives 
and expansion cards. I found out 
which graphics card each manu- 
facturer uses and how much 
RAM is on it, whether you have to 
purchase more video memory to 
get the most from the display sys- 
tem, how big the hard drive is, 
and so forth. 

This is not to say that speed 
isn't important. And I checked it— 
thoroughly. I ran the industry-stan- 
dard SYSmark93 for Windows 
benchmark tests developed by 
Business Applications Perform- 
ance Corporation (BAPCo). The 
BAPCo SYSmarks are real- 
world tests based on stan- 
dard Windows applications 
that many people use, such 
as Word for Windows, Ex- 
cel, Lotus 1-2-3, and Page- 
Maker. BAPCo tests sys- 
tems in six different applica- 
tion categories: word proc- 
essing, spreadsheet, data- 
base, desktop graphics, 
desktop presentation, and 
desktop publishing. Results 
are charted in each catego- 
ry, and an average SYS- 
mark score is calculated. 
For the results of the 
BAPCo tests and further 
explanation of how they 
work, see the methodology 
sidebar, "Explaining the Num- 
bers," and the accompanying 
graphs. 

Configuration 

When you're buying a new sys- 
tem, it's important to check out 
the configuration. In other words, 
how big is the hard drive? Does 
it come with a CD-ROM drive? A 
sound card? You can save a lot 
of money by not paying retail for 
these options later. It's also impor- 
tant that the equipment installed 
fits your application. If you buy a 
system with a graphics card that 
does not support the number of 
colors and resolution you need, 
you'll have to buy another graph- 
ics card. 



Should your new Pentium be 
housed in a desktop case or a tow- 
er? The answer depends on 
where you'll put it and what your 
expansion needs are. Usually, a 
tower resides under the desk, 
and a desktop system sits on top 
of it. More important, towers pro- 
vide more expansion options. 
The Dell desktop system, for ex- 
ample, has only three accessible 
drive bays and two internal ones. 
Two of the accessible bays are 
already taken by the CD-ROM 
drive and the combo (two in one 
bay) floppy drives. You can install 
only one more accessible drive (re- 
movable hard, tape backup, and 




so forth). Of the two internal drive 
bays, one is already used by the 
hard drive. You can install only one 
more hard drive in the Dell system. 

Granted, most people need 
only one hard drive. But you nev- 
er know where your computing 
might take you. If you plan to use 
your new Pentium as a network 
server or as a graphics- or video- 
editing station, you can't get 
enough hard drive space. You 
need as many drive bays as you 
can get. You should look at one 
of the tower configurations, such 
as the Insight machine, which 
has five accessible and eight 
internal bays. 

Also important are the types of 
accessible drives installed in 



your system. Each of these com- 
puters comes with a double- 
speed CD-ROM drive (twice as 
fast as the original technology). 
As programs get larger, CD- 
ROMs will be used more and 
more to distribute software. And 
they are essential to multimedia 
applications. All but the Dell and 
MidWest Micro systems come 
with only one floppy drive, a 3 1 /2- 
inch 1.44MB. Apparently, there's 
an ongoing trend to phase out 
the slower, smaller (in storage 
capacity), and less dependable 
5V4-inch floppies. If you've been 
computing for a while, you prob- 
ably have data on the older Sc- 
inch 1.2MB disks. The ad- 
ditional drive would cost 
about $100. 

Hard drive access 
speed also affects how fast 
your computer runs. All 
these systems come 
equipped with built-in IDE 
hard drive controllers on the 
motherboards, and most of 
the systems in the roundup 
use them. However, two com- 
panies, Micron and Insight, 
included PCI controllers. Sim- 
ilar to processor caches, 
caching controllers hold da- 
ta in anticipation that the 
processor will soon call for 
it. Depending on the size of 
the cache, this cuts down 
considerably on hard drive ac- 
cess. Since the hard drive is the 
most frequent bottleneck in a com- 
puter, the less it's accessed, the bet- 
ter. As you'll see from the follow- 
ing reviews and test results, hard 
drive controllers can increase the 
speed of your computer, depend- 
ing primarily on what kinds of ap- 
plications you run. However, in 
most cases, the motherboard-con- 
trolled hard drives perform fine. 

If you plan to run games or mul- 
timedia applications (such as mul- 
timedia encyclopedias) on your 
system, you'll need a sound 
card. Two of the vendors, Dell 
and Gateway, included sound 
cards for the price listed in the fea- 
tures table, and Gateway even 



JUNE 1994 COMPUTE 



19 



TEST LAB 



sent along a couple of Labtec CS- 
180 speakers. With the ZEOS sys- 
tem, you might not need to buy a 
sound card. It comes equipped 
with on-board business audio, 
which allows you to record and 
play sound — as long as you 
have a microphone and speak- 
ers. The sound quality isn't as 
good as that of the industry-stan- 
dard 16-bit sound cards, but it's 
fine for most desktop and busi- 
ness applications. 

Built-in Options 

In addition to peripherals, you 
should also look at built-in expan- 
sion options, such as the number 
of drive bays, the number of 
expansion slots, the maximum 
memory size, and so on. Mostly, 
these systems are equally 
equipped: three 64-bit PCI slots 
and five ISA, or 16-bit, slots (the 
MidWest Micro has only four ISA 
slots). The main difference is how 
the machines use them. Each ma- 
chine reviewed here uses a PCI 
slot for the graphics adapter and 
one ISA slot for the CD-ROM 
drive controller. The Insight and 
Micron machines use an addition- 
al PCI slot for the hard drive con- 
troller, and the Gateway and Dell 
computers give up an ISA slot for 
a sound board. Additionally, all of 
these systems support RAM con- 
figurations up to 128MB. 

Other than drive bay options, on- 
ly the ZEOS system has notably dif- 
ferent built-in options. In addition 
to the on-board business audio dis- 
cussed above, the ZEOS also has 
an on-board SCSI option. SCSI is 
a peripheral interface that excels 
at high-speed data exchanges 
and works well for large hard 
drives (1GB and above) and high- 
capacity tape backup drives. With 
the SCSI option built in, you don't 
have to use an expansion slot, leav- 
ing the slot for other options. The 
ZEOS supports SCSI-2, the latest 
SCSI technology. 

Before You Buy 

All of the computers in this Test 
Lab roundup are fine machines. 



20 



COMPUTE JUNE 1994 



Austin Power System 60 

Direct price: $3,799 

Warranty: two years, parts and 
labor (first year with on-site 
service); extended warranties 
available; units sent in for repair 
returned to customer within 48 
hours of arrival at Austin's repair 
facility 

Pros: best speed, SCSI card, 
reasonable price, space- 
saving desktop design 

Cons: caddy required for 
CD-ROM drive, limited 
expansion options 

AUSTIN DIRECT 
10300 Metric Dlvd. 
Austin, TX 7S758 
(800)752-1577 



With that in mind, you might have 
a tendency to select the more 
glamorous, faster machines. In 
reality, unless your application tax- 
es a system to its limits (say, desk- 
top publishing or serving a net- 
work), you wouldn't notice any 
performance difference between 
the fastest and slowest of these 
Pentiums. Unless you really need 
the fastest computer, look in- 
stead at what you get for your mon- 
ey. How big is the hard drive? 
Will you have to purchase addi- 
tional memory for the video 
card? How big is the monitor? Do 
you need sound? How good is 
the warranty? 

Barring any unforeseen durabil- 
ity problems, you can't go wrong 
with any of these computers. The 
real issue is that you get every- 
thing you need for the right price. 

WILLIAM HARREL 

AUSTIN POWER 
SYSTEM 60 

Need a fast computer? Austin's Pow- 
er System 60 is the one to buy. 
This desktop dynamo performed 
best overall on the BAPCo tests, do- 
ing exceptionally well on the desk- 
top graphics benchmarks. In fact, 




this machine's speed, small foot- 
print, durable construction, andover- 
all performance leave little to be 
desired. It even comes with a SCSI 
card (the Toshiba CD-ROM drive 
is a SCSI device), which means it 
has the ability to chain as many as 
seven high-capacity drives, such 
as Bernoulli removable, tape back- 
up, and optical drives. However, its 
compact desktop design means 
that most of your drive expansions 
must be external. 

The graphics speed probably 
comes from the Diamond Stealth 
32 PCI adapter. The Power Sys- 
tem 60 is the only computer here 
with this adapter Austin loaded 
the graphics card with 2MB of 
DRAM, the maximum configura- 
tion. The graphics and text dis- 
play not only with crystal clarity 
but with blazing speed as well. 

While this is a great computer, 
it's not perfect. The case's small 
design squeezes the compo- 
nents together, making access to 
them difficult. For example, the 
hard drive bays are located un- 
der the power supply, which 
makes getting to them a chore. 
Granted, you don't change or in- 
stall hard drives often, but by the 
looks of this configuration, you 
might have to turn to a techni- 
cian. Another drawback is that 
the memory banks are beneath 
the accessible drive bays, mean- 
ing that installing memory isn't as 
easy as it should be, either. 

I wish that the Toshiba CD- 
ROM drive did not require a cad- 



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TEST LAB 





^SsSSSSi 



dy (case). While this provides a 
little added protection for the CDs 
themselves, it's a nuisance hav- 
ing to fool with the caddy each 
time you change a disc. And fi- 
nally, the Austin documentation is 
somewhat sparse. If you like to 
install options in your computer 
yourself rather than take it to a 
professional, you won't find much 
help in the manuals. But then 
again, this computer isn't really 
designed for easy expansion. 

These are, of course, small com- 
plaints. Most people don't 
change their system configura- 
tions often. Otherwise, the Power 
System 60 is an exceptional val- 
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parts warranty and a one-year on- 
site warranty. Technical support 
is free for as long as you have the 
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This is the computer of choice 
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Circle Reader Service Number 371 

DELL DIMENSION 
XPS P60 

Dell's offering is an attractive mid- 
size computer, even though it 
turned in relatively middling 
times on the BAPCo tests. A desk- 
top model, the Dimension XPS 
P60 is compact, light, and very 
easy to expand. In general, 
Dell's review system ran just slight- 



22 



COMPUTE JUNE 1994 



Dell Dimension XPS P60 
Direct price: $3,946 
Warranty: one year, parts and labor 
(with on-site service) 

Pros: reasonable speed, excellent 
engineering, sound card, 5%-incti 
floppy drive, space-saving design 

Cons: expense for this 
configuration, limited expansion 
options, relatively small hard 



DELL COMPUTER 
9505 Arboretum Blvd. 
Austin, TX 78759 
(800) 289-3355 



ly slower than the other systems 
(except for the MidWest Micro 
and ZEOS machines, which 
were slower). On the spread- 
sheet test, however, it held its 
own, performing a little better 
than most of the other systems. 

This computer comes with a Cre- 
ative Labs Sound Blaster multime- 
dia system. The sound card 
drives the CD-ROM drive, so you 
don't have to use two slots to get 
both options. The review system 
also came with Multimedia Prod- 
ucts' Sound Effects library, an 
extensive collection of sound 
clips you can use in your presen- 
tations or assign to Windows 
events (such as error message 
dialogs and application openings). 

Perhaps the best things about 
this computer are its ultralight con- 
struction (29 pounds) and easily 
accessible expansion options. 
You open the case by removing 
one thumbscrew on the back of 
the system. The case flips open 
to reveal a very well engineered 
motherboard and case layout. 
The Dimension's bays and mem- 
ory banks are easily accessible. 

It was considerate of Dell to 
install a combination 3V?-inch 
and 5 1 /4-inch floppy unit, which 
requires only one bay for both 
drives. By the way, the Dell sys- 
tem is one of the two computers 
reviewed here that come stan- 
dard with a 5 1 /4-inch drive. (The 



MidWest Micro system is the oth- 
er.) If you have lots of programs 
and data stored on SWinch flop- 
pies, this feature could be impor- 
tant to you. 

The video card in this system 
is a Number Nine GXE with 3MB 
of RAM — a MB more than any of 
the others. However, the extra 
MB didn't do much to improve per- 
formance. The Dimension's per- 
formance on the graphics tests 
was mediocre. The combination 
of the GXE and Dell's excellent 
15-inch monitor, however, made 
for crisp, clean graphics. 

A minor drawback is the sys- 
tem's 450MB hard drive (each of 
the other systems has a hard 
drive with at least 500MB). This 
computer's hard drive is ade- 
quate for most applications, but 
I wonder why Dell didn't go the 



A NOTE ON PRICES 

With computer technology chang- 
ing more rapidly than ever before 
and with options more plentiful 
than ever before, computer prices 
can be a tricky business. 

It pays to keep the following 
points in mind: 

Computers are available in a 
variety of configurations, each 
with a slightly different price. Also, 
because of the rapid changes in 
this market, a computer manufac- 
turer may change system compo- 
nents, software, or prices between 
the time a review is written and the 
time the magazine hits the stands. 
By the time you read this, for exam- 
ple, some computer manufacturers 
may offer a 66-MHz Pentium sys- 
tem for the same price we've listed 
for their 60-MHz systems. 

Remember, too, that you're buy- 
ing support in addition to the com- 
puter. Find the support policy that 
meets your particular needs. 

At COMPUTE, we make every 
effort to verify prices. This month, 
the price that appears with each 
review' is for the review configura- 
tion. It's a good idea, however, to 
call the manufacturer or vendor to 
make sure that the configuration 
you want matches the price you 
have in mind. 

—MIKE HUDNALL 



5 sure steps to a 
successful future' 



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TEST LAB 



extra mile like everybody else — 
especially since this machine 
costs a few hundred dollars 
more than most of the others. 
Granted, you get Dell's great rep- 
utation and a great little comput- 
er, but . . . 

The Dimension is backed by a 
responsive technical support 
staff. This is not the machine to 
buy if you need a graphics work- 
horse or a network server, but it's 
great for a workstation and home 
office use. My only real objection 
is that it costs too much. 

Circle Reader Service Number 372 

GATEWAY 2000 
P5-60 

Gateway's P5-60 scored right in 
the middle of the BAPCo tests, 
showing good, strong performance 
on all of them. Surprisingly, the sys- 
tem's performance was relatively 



Gateway 2000 P5-60 
Direct price: $4,127 
Warranty: one year, parts and labor 
(with on-site service) 

Pros: great 17-inch monitor; sound 
card and speakers; excellent 
expansion options; sturdy, 
excellent design 

Cons: none 

GATEWAY 2000 
610 Gateway Dr. 
N. Sioux City, SD 57049 
(800) 046-2000 



even across the board. It didn't 
excel on any of the tests. In other 
words, this computer is plenty fast 
enough, but not especially adept at 
any particular application. The real 
story behind the P5-60 is expansion 
options and value. 

Out of the box, this is a formidable- 
looking machine. The tower construe- 




*mmmm* 



tion is sleek and sturdy. Inside the 
case you'll find plenty of room for add- 
ing drives and other expansion op- 
tions. The memory bank area is so 
roomy that you can get to it with 
both hands, if need be. The P5-60 
holds as many as five accessible 
drives and three fixed disks. In the 
review system, two of the five ac- 



Are Pentiums fast? I'll say. The Busi- 
ness Applications Performance Cor- 
poration (BAPCo) SYSmark93 bench- 
marks were used to test these com- 
puters. The tests run a series of Win- 
dows applications in six categories. 
The categories and applications are 



EXPLAINING THE NUMBERS 

marks. These scores are com- 
pared to that of the calibration sys- 
tem, which is a 486DX-33 with 
8MB of RAM. The calibration sys- 
tem runs at 100 SYSmarks, or 
about 2V? times more slowly than 



as follows. 

Word processing: 
WordPerfect 5.2, Word for 
Windows 2.0, Ami Pro 3.0 


250 

Better 


Overall SYSmarks 






Spreadsheet: 
Lotus 1-2-3 4.0 for Windows, 
Excel 4.0 


200 






Database: 
Paradox 1 .0 


150 






Desktop graphics: 
CorelDRAW! 3.0 


100 






Desktop presentation: 
Freelance Graphics 2.0, 
PowerPoint 3.0 


50 






Desktop publishing: 
PageMaker 5.0 


Worse 







Systems are graded with SYS- 
marks. As you study the graphs, 
notice that the Pentiums turned in 
scores between 200 and 275 SYS- 





the average Pentium. To make the 
tests more meaningful, the 
BAPCo tests were run on a 486- 
66 with local bus; the results are 
included in the charts for compari- 
son. Notice that the Pentiums ran 
about 75 percent faster than the 
486-66 with a comparable display 
system. 

Notice also that some of the 
Pentiums are more adept at cer- 
tain types of applications than oth- 
ers. You should look for a system 
that suits your particular needs. If 
you need an overall business ma- 
chine, select one that performed 
strongly across the board. 

The BAPCo software is current- 
ly available for an introductory 
price of $99. Write to Business 
Applications Performance Corpora- 
tion, 2801 Northwestern Parkway, 
M/S NW1-20, Santa Clara, Califor- 
nia 95051. You can call the com- 
pany at (408) 988-7654. 
Circle Reader Service Number 378 




24 COMPUTE JUNE 1994 



cessible bays were occupied by a 
floppy drive and a CD-ROM drive. 

Of all the computers reviewed 
here, Gateway's P5-60 has the 
most impressive display system. 
The graphics subsystem is pow- 
ered by the ATI mach32 with 2MB 
of memory (the same adapter 
that's in the Insight machine but 
with a MB more memory). Gateway 
also sent its 17-inch, high-resolu- 
tion CrystalScan monitor. The larg- 
er monitor makes text easier to 
read at higher resolutions, and the 
CrystalScan displays graphics daz- 
zlingly. In fact, you can't get better 
graphics and colors without shell- 
ing out an additional $1,000 for a 
monitor with a Sony Trinitron tube. 

The review system came with an 
optional Gateway sound card and 
Labtec speakers, which add just 
over $100 to the cost. When you pur- 
chase a P5-60, you get your 
choice of one software application 
from a list of about ten titles, includ- 



ing Microsoft Word, Access, and Ex- 
cel. Gateway guarantees the ma- 
chine with a one-year on-site war- 
ranty. Several extended warranty op- 
tions are available, including a two- 
year parts warranty, rather than the 
one-year on-site warranty. Gate- 
way's technical support lines are ex- 
tremely busy. More than once, I wait- 
ed several minutes to speak to a 
technician. But once I got through, 
the support person knew his ma- 
chine well. My questions were an- 
swered clearly and considerately. 
However, the manual that comes 
with the P5-60 is quite thorough— 
you may not have to call tech sup- 
port at all. 

OK, so this is not the fastest com- 
puter in the bunch. It is, however, 
my pick for best value. If you plan 
to use this system for a graphics 
workstation, you should consider 
spending a few hundred dollars 
more for the 17-inch monitor. 

Circle Reader Service Number 373 



INSIGHT PCI P60 CD 

Like the Gateway machine, the 
Insight PCI P60 CD comes in a stur- 
dy tower case and is easily 
expandable. It's aiso the second- 
fastest computer in this review, pri- 
marily because of the Intel PCI 
disk controller that Insight supplied 
in the test system (included in the 
price quoted in the features table). 
It performed well in all of the 
BAPCo categories, coming in slight- 
ly behind the first-place Austin com- 
puter in all instances. The only oth- 
er machine that performed as well 
is the Micron, which also came 
with a PCI disk controller. The PCI 
P60 CD is a fast computer. 

I came close to choosing this sys- 
tem from Insight as the best value, 
but there are a few areas where it 
falls slightly short. For example, 
even though it has the same graph- 
ics card that the system from Gate- 
way has (an ATI mach32), the 



BAPCo Benchmarks 



Better 



Worse 




JUNE 1994 COMPUTE 



25 



TEST LAB 



card comes with only 1MB of mem- 
ory. To max the card out, you'd 
have to purchase another MB. 
Also, the standard monitor is capa- 
ble of a resolution of only 
1024 x 768, rather than the 
1280 x 1024 supported by the 
graphics card and the rest of the 
monitors in this review. While you 
probably wouldn't want to run Win- 
dows at 1280 x 1024 on a 15- 
inch monitor (the text would be too 
small), you'd find the extra dots help- 
ful when working with graphics. 

These small drawbacks aside, 
this computer is no slouch. It has 
more drive bays — five accessible 
and eight internal — than the others, 
making it ideal for a network serv- 
er. The system's speed also 
makes it a great desktop publish- 
ing system. 

One reason for this computer's 
tremendous speed is the Intel disk 
controller. While this is not a cach- 



Insight PCI P60 CD 
Direct price: $3,349 
Warranty: one year, parts and 
labor 

Pros: great price; excellent 
expansion options; strong, 
sturdy design; reasonable speed 

Cons: graphics card with only 
1MB RAM, monitor incapable ot 
1280x1024 

INSIGHT DIRECT 
1912 W. Fourth St. 
Tempe, AZ 85281 
(800) 927-7848 



ing controller (as is the one in the 
Micron machine), it does boost sys- 
tem performance significantly. The 
computer was tested with and with- 
out the controller, and there was 
about a 10-percent performance dif- 
ference, which is significant when 




working with large spreadsheet, 
database, and graphics files. 

Insight does not offer buyers a 
choice of software applications, 
but the company does include 
four CD-ROM titles. Which titles 
you receive depends on what's 
available when you order your com- 
puter. I got a multimedia encyclo- 
pedia, an almanac, Publish It!, and 



BAPCo Benchmarks 



Better 






Worse 




Desktop 
Graphics 



Desktop 
_ Presentation 



Desktop 
Publishing 



26 COMPUTE JUNE 1994 



^Software 

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TEST LAB 



an interactive animals book. Insight 
systems have a one-year warran- 
ty, but it's not an on-site warranty. 
You have to send the system in to 
get it fixed. 

With speed, expansion, Insight's 
reputation for dependability and a 
relatively low price tag, you really 
can't go wrong with this computer 
My minor objection— the skimping 
in the display system configuration — 
can be corrected for a few hundred 
dollars more. If you need speed 
and expandability, check out this 
Pentium. 

Circle Reader Service Number 374 


MICRON P60PCI 
P0WERSTATI0N CD 

Now here's another blazingly 
fast computer. The Micron 
P60PCI PowerStation CD came in 
fourth on the overall SYSmark 
tests but performed exceptional- 
ly well on the database, desktop 
graphics, and desktop publish- 
ing tests, In fact, it turned in the 
fastest times in both database 
and DTP processing. This desk- 
top machine is not only fast but 
easily expandable. 


Like the Dell desktop, the Pow- 
erStation offers easily accessible 
drive bays and memory banks. 
My only complaint is that the proc- 
essor chip socket is under the 
exhaust fan, making it difficult to 
get to. Most people never 
change their processor chips, 
but if you ever need to, it could 
be a chore in this system. 

The feature that makes this com- 
puter stand out is the Green 
Cache hard drive controller in- 
stalled in one of the PCI slots. 
This caching, mirroring controller 
came with 16MB of memory, Re- 




Austin Power De|| Djmension xps p0 O Gateway 2000 P5-60 
system oo 


Price 


$3799 $3,946 $4,127 


BIOS type and version 


AMI 1.00. 03.AFI AMI-Del!1993 


AMI 1.00.03.AFI 


Case style 


desktop desktop 


tower 


CD-ROM drive 


yes yes 


yes 


Graphics adapter 


Diamond Stealtn 32 #9GXE ATI mach32 


Graphics adapter RAM 


2MB 3MB 2MB 


Maximum resolution/colors 


1 280 x 1 024/256 1 1 52 x 870/256 1 280 x 1 024/256 


Maximum resolution/refresh rate 


1 280 x 1 024/60HZ 1 024 x 768/90Hz NA 


Floppy drives 


3,5 5.25 and 3.5' 3.5 


Hard drive controller location 


motherboard motherboard 


motherboard 


Hard drive controller 


proprietary proprietary 


proprietary 


Hard drive size 


525MB 450MB 


540MB 


Hard drive speed 


1 ms 12 ms 


11 ms 


Monitor size 


15 


15 


17 


PCI/VESA local bus 


PCI 


PC! 


PCI 


Sound card 


no 


yes 


yes 


Accessible drive bays 


3 


3 


3 


Internal drive bays 


2 


2 


2 


Available expansion slots 


2 PCI and 4 ISA 


2 PCI and 4 ISA 


2 PCI and 4 ISA 


Total expansion slots 


2 PCI. 4 ISA, and 1 PCI/ISA 


3 PCI and 5 ISA 


3 PCI and 5 ISA 


Installable RAM 


128MB 


128MB 


128MB 


Installed external cache 


256K 


256K 


256K 


On-board business audio 


no 


no 


no 


On-board SCSI 


no* 


no 


no 


Choice of software bundle 


one Lotus application 


none 


one application 


Windows version included 


Windows 3.1 


Windows 3.1 


WWG3.11 


Other software included 


CD-ROM bundle 


Sound Effects Library 


Gateway 2000 bundle 


Warranty 


2 years, parts 


1 year 


1 year 


On-site service warranty 


first year 


1 year 


1 year 


"SCSI card included **12B0 x 1024/256 with 2MB on card, monitor capable of 1024x768 


28 COMPUTE JUNE 1994 













member that a cache holds data 
in anticipation that it will soon be 
needed by the processor, increas- 
ing speed by cutting down on 
hard drive access. The BAPCo 
tests were run with and without 
the controller. The overall differ- 
ence in performance was a whop- 
ping 15 percent, taking the Pow- 
erStation from the slowest ranking 
to fourth place, and to the fastest 
for a few applications. The Green 
Cache controller supports up to 
four IDE drives, several different 
memory configurations, and a 
wealth of options for fine-tuning 



Micron P60PCI PowerStation CD 

Direct price: $4,388 

Warranty: one year, parts and labor, 

including on-site service and 

lifetime tech support 

Pros: caching controller, speed, 

space-saving design 
Cons: expense, lack of speed 

without caching controller 



MICRON COMPUTER 
915E. KarcherRd. 
Nampa, ID 83687 
(800) 388-6334 
(208) 465-3434 




Insight PCI P60 CD 



Micron P60PCI 
PowerStation CD 



MidWest Micro Elite 
P5-60 PCI 



$3,349 



$4,383 



$3,299 



ZEOS Pantera 



$3,395 



AMI 1.00,05 AFI 



Phoenix for Pentium 1 .03 



AMI 1.00.03.AFI 



desktop 



Phoenix 4.02 



yes 



yes 



ATI mach32 



Diamond Viper FCI 



Diamond Viper PCI 



2MB 



1MB 



1024x768/16*- 



12S0x 1024/256 



1024X768/72H2 



1280 x 1024/60HZ 



1280 x 1024/16 



1280x1024/60Hz 



yes 



Diamond Viper PCI 



2MB 



1280x1024/256 



1280 x 1024/74HZ 



3.5 



5 25' and 3.5 



PCI slot 



motherboard 



motherboard 



Intel PCI IDE 



Gr_en Cache DC-690B PCI 



540MB 



proprietary 



528MB 



proprietary 



1 PCI and 4 ISA 



1 PCI and 4 ISA 



2 PCI and 3 ISA 



2 PCI and 4 ISA 



3 PCI ana 5 ISA 



3PCIano5ISA 



3 PCI and 4 ISA 



3 PCI and 5 ISA 



128MB 



none 



Microsoft Office 



Windows 3.1 

4 CD-ROM titles 



Windows 3.1 



yes 



one Lotus application 



WWG3.11 



1 year 



3 years 



1 year 



1 year 



optional 



JUNE 1994 COMPUTE 



29 



TEST LAB 




II I Ml 



,11111 )Wi.Wl 



^ 'IllllflillilHI 



hard drive access. 

The PowerStation's graphics 
subsystem is powered by the Dia- 
mond Viper PCI. The ZEOS and 
MidWest Micro computers also 
use this adapter, and I noticed 
that both of them did relatively 
well on the graphics tests. The 
MidWest Micro system turned in 
a lower score, but it had only 1 MB 
of video RAM, which can some- 
what slow the display. 

The system I reviewed came 
with WordPerfect for Windows, 
but by the time you read this, Mi- 
cron will bundle Microsoft Office 
with its Pentiums. In addition, the 
systems will come with 66-MHz 
Pentium chips. You should note, 
however, that most tests to date 
have not revealed a significant per- 
formance difference between 60- 
MHz and 66-MHz chips. The 66- 
MHz chips are only slightly faster. 

The PowerStation comes with 
a one-year on-site warranty. The 
technical support staff is knowl- 
edgeable. I really like this comput- 
er, but it costs more than $1,000 
more than some of the others, pri- 
marily because of the caching con- 
troller, which is necessary for the 
PowerStation to maintain its pep- 
py performance. 

Circle Reader Service Number 375 

MIDWEST MICRO 
ELITE P5-60 PCI 

The Elite P5-60 PCI is the least 
expensive system reviewed here, 
and it's also the slowest. All of the 
other Pentium machines in this round- 



30 



COMPUTE JUNE 1994 



MidWest Micro Elite P5-60 PCI 
Direct price: $3,299 
Warranty: three years, parts and 

labor; 30-day money-back 

guarantee 

Pros: low price, 17-inch monitor, 
well-designed minitower, 5%-lnch 
(loppy drive, three-year warranty 

Cons: relative lack of speed 

MIDWEST MICRO 
6910 U.S. Rte. 36 E 

Fletcher, OH 45326 
(800) 972-8844 



up turned in better scores on the 
BAPCo tests. Be careful, however, 
not to purchase a computer based 
on speed tests alone. This minitow- 
er system still delivers Pentium per- 
formance and has many features to 
recommend it, including strong 
expansion options, a good graph- 
ics card, and a 17-inch monitor. 

The sturdy, compact tower 
case has four accessible and four 
internal drive bays, which is more 
space than most people will ever 
need. The motherboard is easy to 
get to; you'd have no trouble insert- 
ing cards, installing memory, or add- 
ing new drives. Unlike most of the 
others, the Elite comes with a 5 1 /j- 
inch floppy drive, which means you 
wouldn't have to add one. 

The Diamond Viper PCI graphics 
adapter in this machine is the same 
card that's in some of the systems 
that turned in impressive speeds in 
this review. However, this one 
comes with only 1MB of DRAM. 
You'd have to purchase another MB 
to get the most from the high-reso- 
lution, 17-inch monitor (with 0.26- 
mm dot pitch). While it's not as ele- 
gant as the Gateway 2000 Crystal- 
Scan, the MidWest Micro monitor 
will serve all but the most critical 
high-end color graphics applica- 
tions quite well. 

Also impressive is MidWest 
Micro's three-year REAL warranty, 
which includes all components, 
such as the hard drive, monitor, and 
so on. Computers don't break down 
often, but it's reassuring to know 



TEST LAB PICKS 

If you're choosing a Pentium system 
for a home-based office or small busi- 
ness, you really can't go wrong with 
any of these computers. Depending 
on your application, each of these 
workhorses has something to recom- 
mend it over the others. 

Hands down, the MidWest Micro 
system is the best bargain. It has the 
lowest price and comes with a 17- 
inch monitor, which would cost yau 
a few hundred dollars more with 
most other companies. However, 
the MidWest Micro is also the slow- 
est computer reviewed here, and 
the monitor is not really good 
enough for high-end graphics work. 
If you're looking for speed and a 
good graphics display, go with the 
Gateway 2000 machine. 

If you need a blazing performer, 
take a look at the Austin computer. It's 
the fastest of these seven, it's reason- 
ably priced, and it comes with a 
SCSI card for added expansion. 

The three tower systems reviewed 
here— from Gateway 2000, Insight, 
and ZEOS— are all ideal for network 
servers. They provide excellent drive 
and other expansion options. The In- 
sight and Gateway 2000 computers 
are slightly faster; however, only the 
most demanding network environ- 
ment would benefit noticeably from 
the performance difference. 

—WILLIAM HARREL 



that yours is covered well past the 
standard one year. In three years 
there will be a new processor stan- 
dard anyway. You might be looking 
at a new system by then. 

The Elite's documentation is a lit- 
tle sparse. If you like to add cards 
and other options yourself, you 
won't get much help from the man- 
uals. However, I called technical 
support a few times, and the reps 
knew their computers well. 

Again, I was disappointed with 
the Elite's performance on the 
BAPCo tests, but speed isn't eve- 
rything — surely not a reason to dis- 
qualify this computer as a good val- 
ue. Many people compute on a 
budget and are willing to sacrifice 
a benchmark point or two for a few 
hundred dollars. 

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Circle Reader Service Number 137 



TEST LAB 



ZEOS PANTERA 

Like the MidWest Micro system, the 
ZEOS Pantera did not turn in blaz- 
ing results on the BAPCo bench- 
marks. However, of all these 
machines, this one has the most 
expansion options and impressive 
features. If you need a strong net- 
work server or have an application 
requiring potentially enormous stor- 
age capacity check out this system. 

Out of the box, the Pantera moth- 
erboard supports up to four IDE 
hard drives. There is also a SCSI-2 
option, which allows you to run high- 
capacity SCSI drives and tape back- 
up drives. To activate the SCSI op- 
tion, all you do is plug in a chip, 
turn the SCSI option on in the ma- 
chine's BIOS setup, and take off. 

Also impressive is the Pantera's 
business audio feature. Unlike the 
system boards in the other comput- 
ers, this system board comes 



ZEOS Pantera 

Direct price: $3,395 (plus $49 for 

SCSI option) 
Warranty: one year, parts and labor 

Pros: built-in SCSI option and 
sound, most expansion options, 
well-designed case 

Cons: relative lack of speed 



ZEOS INTERNATIONAL 
1301 Industrial Blvd. 
Minneapolis, WIN 55413 
(800) 423-5891 
(612) 362-1234 




* ViW f I I i. 




ready to support sound. Just plug 
your speakers or headphones into 
the back. There is also a jack for 
a microphone. Granted, the sound 
isn't comparable to the high-fideli- 
ty stereo sound you get from some 
high-end sound cards, but it's 
adequate for most applications. 



PENTIUM VERSUS POWERPC: 
WHICH WILL WIN THE DESKTOP WARS? 



IBM and Apple are about to release 
a new computer chip that could revo- 
lutionize the desktop— the PowerPC. 
According to both companies, Pow- 
erPC computers, based on Motoro- 
la's PP601 RISC processor, will cost 
less and run much faster than the Pen- 
tium. And, to boot, they'll run not only 
Windows programs but also DOS pro- 
grams and all Macintosh programs 
that run under System 7. 

Theoretically, you'll get two comput- 
ers in one. Windows will run under an 
interpreter developed by Insignia So- 
lutions. Recent attempts at running Win- 
dows emulation software on Macin- 
toshes have resulted in much too 
sluggish performance. Windows emula- 
tion on the PowerPC is expected to be 
better but not optimal. Experts are pre- 
dicting that the PowerPC will run Win- 
dows programs with performance sim- 
ilar to that of a 25-MHz 486. If you've 
ever run graphics programs at this 
speed, you know they're a bit slow. 

Macintosh applications should run 
faster, but where the PowerPC will ex- 
cel is in applications written especial- 
ly for the platform. Several compa- 
nies, including IBM and Apple, are 
dedicated to developing PowerPC pro- 



grams, but there aren't many availa- 
ble yet, and it could be a while be- 
fore you see many. You'll probably 
never see as many PowerPC pro- 
grams as Windows programs. 

Will the PowerPC be less expen- 
sive? At first, possibly. However, In- 
tel is poised and ready. The compa- 
ny has stepped up production of the 
Pentium chip. As you can see, from 
the accompanying reviews, Pentium 
prices are already reasonable, es- 
pecially when compared to new re- 
leases of earlier technologies. Pen- 
tium prices currently run around 
$3,000. The first PowerPCs are ex- 
pected to weigh in at about $2,000. 
However, wait a few more months, 
and you very well may see some Pen- 
tium systems encroaching on the 
$2,000 mark. Systems based on 486 
technology will cost less than $1 ,000. 
The question is, How low can Apple 
and IBM go on the PowerPC? 

The bottom line: More than 50,000 
applications run on Intel machines. 
Don't bank on a new, yet-to-be-estab- 
lished platform. The PowerPC proba- 
bly will make a difference. But it will be 
years before anybody loosens Intel's 
stranglehold on desktop computers. 



32 



COMPUTE JUNE 1994 



Most people don't use sound with 
their computers often. Until now, 
though, you had to buy a Macin- 
tosh to get a system with sound 
built into the motherboard. 

Speaking of the motherboard, the 
Pantera's is so spacious and ac- 
cessible that you can drive a truck 
through it. Everything is easy to get 
to, including the memory banks, proc- 
essor socket, and four motherboard 
plugs for the hard drives. ZEOS's 
documentation is thorough and easy 
to follow. The company also has an 
instant fax-back system, where you 
can get documentation on any of 
the components, such as the hard 
drive or graphics card. 

I called the ZEOS 24-hour tech- 
nical support line several times. 
Most often, I got through after a five- 
minute (or so) wait. Once, I was 
forced to leave a message. The Pan- 
tera line was just being released dur- 
ing the review period. The techni- 
cians had not been trained on 
these systems yet, but they did 
have access to pertinent documen- 
tation and the company's engi- 
neers. Typically though, ZEOS pro- 
vides great technical support. 

If you're looking for the fastest 
computer around, look elsewhere. 
But if you need a sturdy system you 
can't outgrow, check out the Pan- 
tera. With up to four hard drives, 
built-in SCSI, and built-in business 
audio (which frees two ISA slots), 
this computer will serve you well 
now and into the future. 

Circle Reader Service Number 377 



Graduate as a Fully Trained 
Electronics Professional! 



If you want to learn about electronics, 
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CIE's reputation as the world 
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They'll tell you success didn't come 
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A School of Thousands. 
A Class of One. Since 1934. 



PROGRAMMING POWER 



Tom Campbel 



I chuckled to myself 
because the notion 

was clearly years, if 
not decades, away. 



.. 



MICROHELP'S 
HIGHEDIT 

A few years ago the notion of 
"software ICs" spread like wild- 
fire through the computing in- 
telligentsia. The thought was 
that you should be able to 
plug software components 
like text editors and spread- 
sheets together with the same 
sort of cleanly defined inter- 
face that engineers employ to 
create electronic products us- 
ing integrated circuits. I chuck- 
led to myself because the no- 
tion was clearly years, if not 
decades, away. Vendors 
could never get it together to 
create such a cooperative pro- 
gramming environment . . . 
or could they? 

Visual Basic was already 
one of Microsoft's top-selling 
products. Its custom controls 
had provided developers with 
a means of extending the Vis- 
ual Basic programming environ- 
ment without having the 
source code to Visual Basic it- 
self, and they were already sell- 
ing like suntan oil at a nudist 
colony. 

Visual Basic controls, cus- 
tom or not, work like this. A float- 
ing tool palette like the one 
you see in a paint or draw pro- 
gram contains a selection of 
control icons. You click on an 
icon and "paint" the control on- 
to the screen. Most controls, 
such as list boxes, edit fields, 
and command buttons, are vis- 
ible. A few, such as timers, are 
not. A control has methods, 
properties, and events. A meth- 
od is a subroutine unique to 
that control, such as Addltem 
in a list box. A property is a con- 
figuration variable that can be 
read or written to, such as 
BackColor and ForeColor. An 
event is a user-modifiable sub- 
routine such as Click and 
KeyPressed that fires when 
some part of the control is ac- 
tivated. The genius of Visual Ba- 
sic is that Microsoft opens up 



the custom control format and 
allows anyone to write custom 
controls that integrate Visual 
Basic applications quickly and 
easily. Just choose Add File 
from the File menu, choose 
the VBX file (internally, VBXs 
are DLLs) from \WIN- 
DOWSXSYSTEM, and vola- 
tile icon for the new control is 
added to your tool palette for 
this project. Microsoft and all 
the vendors I'll cover in com- 
ing months allow you to dis- 
tribute the VBXs to users free, 
so the custom controls can be- 
come part of any Visual Basic 
application you care to sell. 
You need only pay for the con- 
trol when you buy it for devel- 
opment. (An accompanying 
LIC file, which you most certain- 
ly may not distribute, identifies 
your system as a development 
environment and gives you 
programmatical access to the 
VBX control.) 

One of the most asked-for 
custom controls on Compu- 
Serve is a text box with a ca- 
pacity greater than the 50K or 
so built into Windows and that 
supports multiple fonts. Mi- 
croHelp (4359 Shallowford In- 
dustrial Parkway, Marietta, GA 
30066; 404-516-0898) has 
filled that need with the impres- 
sive HighEdit, a custom con- 
trol that handles multiple 
fonts, multiple windows, col- 
ored text, search and replace, 
left and right margins, left-jus- 
tified tabs, text-only support 
for the Windows Clipboard, 
superscripts, subscripts, 
word wrap, and importing and 
exporting of ASCII files. Files 
can be stored in industry-stan- 
dard Rich Text Format (RTF) 
or a proprietary HED format. 
There's also support for "input 
fields," which allow you to add 
mail merge to your edit con- 
trol. While the documentation 
on input fields is somewhat 
sparse, they can be used for 
many other things, such as 
macros that stop and ask the 
user for input, or an indexing 



scheme that uses invisible in- 
put fields to mark words to be 
indexed. 

HighEdit maintains a su- 
perb balance between feature 
richness and flexibility. For 
example, there's a built-in 
toolbar that can't be custom- 
ized, but you can easily disa- 
ble it and supply your own, us- 
ing standard Visual Basic tech- 
niques. Likewise, you can use 
HighEdit's handy built-in dia- 
logs for font and color selec- 
tion, file I/O, and search and 
replace, or you can use the 
Windows common dialogs. 

The documentation for High- 
Edit is complete but not gener- 
ous. There's no tutorial and lit- 
tle advice for structuring your 
program (for example, should 
you handle multiple windows 
within HighEdit or use MDI 
child windows?). Surprisingly, 
there was no mention of Mi- 
croHelp's other products, such 
as its SpellPro spelling check- 
er, its Communications Library, 
or its Gizmos custom control 
pack, all of which can work 
seamlessly with HighEdit. 

It seems to me that the com- 
parison baseline for a product 
like this should be Write, 
which comes free with Win- 
dows. Here HighEdit has over- 
looked a few obvious features, 
such as undo, insertion of im- 
ages via the Windows Clip- 
board, and decimal tabs. 
HighEdit is also quite slow com- 
pared to Write when loading 
files over about 100K. The rea- 
son for slow loads is usually 
that an editor is formatting the 
file internally as it loads, yet 
the HighEdit control still re- 
quires manual reformatting at 
times and doesn't paginate on 
the fly. I'd like to see those 
things changed. Tabs are al- 
so a bit awkward. Despite 
these shortcomings, HighEdit 
is a great way to get multiple 
fonts, big files, and mail 
merge into your next Visual Ba- 
sic app with amazingly little 
work. G 



34 COMPUTE JUNE 1994 







coming this summer 

for PC CD-ROM 1-800-238-4277 

For a free Harvester Demo video tape send a $3.95 check or money order for postage and 
handling to: Merit Software, 13707 Gamma Road, Dallas, TX 75S44 

©1994 Merit Software. ©1994 Future Visionary, Inc. Harvester is registered trademark of Future Visionary, Inc. AH Rights Reserved. 



TIPS & TOOLS 



Edited by Richard C. Leinecker 



Get access to 

Windows when your 

screen saver locks 

you out, and view the 

time from 

the command line. 



One-Line Time 

in reading your November 
1993 "Tips & Tools," I noted 
the ongoing quest for the sim- 
plest one-line time procedure. 
Here's my version. It's a 
batch file called FINDTIME- 
.BAT 

©ECHO OFF 
ECHO.ITIMEIFINDis" 

ECHO. I pipes an Enter key to 
the Time command. The prob- 
lem with the Time command 
is that it waits for you to press 
Enter. This way there's an En- 
ter key equivalent piped to it 
so it doesn't wait. 

The output of the Time com- 
mand is piped to Find, which 
filters out all but the line con- 
taining the string is. That's the 
line that reports the time. 

SCOTT CO I LEY 
THOMASTON, ME 

Advance and Be Recognized 

Have you ever forgotten your 
Windows screen-saver pass- 
word? It can be a real hassle 
if you do. I've found a way to 
retype a password without 
knowing the old password. 
First, load your CONTROL.INI 
file into Notepad. Scroll down 
until you find a headline that 
says "[SCREEN SAVER]". Af- 
ter that it says "Password^' fol- 
lowed by your password in 
code. Delete everything to 
the right of the equal sign. 

Save the file, exit Windows, 
and restart Windows. When 
you're back in Windows, 
open the Control Panel, se- 
lect Desktop, open Screen 
Saver Setup, and type in your 
new password. Your new pass- 
word will now work for the 
screen saver. 

JESSE COURCHAINE 
SUN PRAIRIE, Wl 

Multidisk BACK 

You might recall that last 
month I published a tip from Ki- 
rill Semenov that used PKZIP 



to back up files. His tip re- 
quired the registered version 
of PKZIP to back up files over 
multiple disks. I spent some 
time working with his BACK- 
.BAT program and came up 
with a small BASIC program 
that lets you use multiple 
disks even without the regis- 
tered version of PKZIP. We at 
COMPUTE feel strongly that 
you should register PKZIP 
and any other shareware that 
you're using, but this work- 
around will help you get by 
while you wait for your regis- 
tered version to arrive. 

The BASIC program is 
Copybig, and the batch file 
(which is just a variation of 
Mr. Semenov's) is called 
BACK1.BAT Replace the di- 
rectories listed in BACK1.BAT 
with the names of the directo- 
ries you want to back up. 
D:\WORK\TELIX and 

D:\WORK\CHESS are just ex- 
amples. Make sure the flop- 
pies you use are completely 
blank. And make sure you 
don't overlap backup files on 
the floppies. If a large file 
takes 2 1 /2 disks, don't try to 
save anything else on the last 
disk. Continue the backup 
with a fresh disk. 

To restore these files, you 
need the BASIC program Rest- 
big and the batch file REST1- 
.BAT 

Here is COPYBIG. BAS. Re- 
member that an indented line 
is a continuation of the preced- 
ing line. 

OPEN "ZIPFILE" FOR INPUT AS #1 

INPUT #1, DR$ 

INPUT #1, FILE$ 

CLOSE #1 

disknum% = 1 

PRINT "Insert disk number "; 

disknum%; " then press a 

key . . ." 
GOSUB WaitKey 
DN$ = STR$(disknum%) 
DRFILE$ = LEFT$(DR$, 2) + 

RIGHT$(DN$, 1) + F1LE$ 
OPEN DRFILE$ FOR BINARY AS #2 

LEN = 512 



OPEN FILE$ FOR BINARY AS #1 

LEN = 512 
destpointer = 1 
srcpointer = 1 
ON ERROR GOTO DiskFull 
TRANSFERS = SPACE$(512) 
CopyLoop: 

GET #1, srcpointer, TRANSFERS 
IF E0F(1) GOTO FileDone 
srcpointer = srcpointer + 512 
PUT #2, destpointer, TRANSFERS 
destpointer = destpointer + 512 
GOTO CopyLoop 
DiskFull: 
CLOSE #2 
DRFILE$ = LEFT$(DR$, 2) + 

"MOREFILZ" 
OPEN DRFILE$ FOR BINARY AS #2 
CLOSE #2 
BEEP 

disknum% = disknum% + 1 
PRINT "Insert disk number "; 

disknum%; " then press a 

key . . ." 
GOSUB WaitKey 
DN$ = STR$(disknum%) 
DRFILE$ = LEFT$(DR$, 2) + 

RIGHT$(DN$, 1) + FILE$ 
OPEN DRFILE$ FOR BINARY AS #2 
destpointer a 1 
RESUME 
WaitKey: 
a$ = INKEY$ 

IFa$ = "" GOTO WaitKey 
RETURN 
FileDone: 

PUT #2, destpointer, TRANSFER$ 
CLOSE #1 
CLOSE #2 
SYSTEM 

Here is BACK1.BAT 

©ECHO OFF 
ECHO. 

IF"%1'W" GOTO NOPARAMS 
IF "%1"=="a:" GOTO BACKUP 
IF"%1'W'A:" GOTO BACKUP 
IF"%r=="b:" GOTO BACKUP 
IF"%1"=="B:" GOTO BACKUP 
GOTO BADJRIVE 
:BACKUP 
CLS 

ECHO WARNING: Backup process 
ECHO may require multiple disks! 
ECHO. 

ECHO Insert first backup disk in 
drive %1 . 
PAUSE 



36 COMPUTE JUNE 1994 



ECHO. 

ECHO Performing disk diagnostics 

on backup media . . . 
CHKDSK/f%1 
CLS 
ECHO. 

ECHO Backing up: D:\WORK\ 
ECHO TELIX and subdirectories 
ECHO to TELIX.ZIP . . . 
ECHO. 

ECHO %1 > ZIPFILE 
ECHO TELIX.ZIP >> ZIPFILE 
PKZIP -rp TELIX D:\ 

WORKVTELIXW* 
QBASIC /RUN COPYBtG 
DEL TELIX.ZIP 
CLS 
ECHO. 

ECHO Backing up: D:\WORK\ 
ECHO CHESS and subdirectories 
ECHO to CHESS.ZIP . . . 
ECHO. 

ECHO %1 > ZIPFILE 
ECHO CHESS.ZIP >> ZIPFILE 
PKZIP -rp CHESS D:\WORK\ 

CHESSW* 

QBASIC /RUN COPYBIG 
DEL CHESS.ZIP 
:DONE 
CLS 
ECHO. 
ECHO Done! 
ECHO. 

ECHO Performing disk diagnostics 
ECHO on backup media . . . 
CHKDSK/f%1 
DIR %1 
GOTO END 
:BAD_DRIVE 

ECHO A hard disk is not 
ECHO supported as a destination. 
GOTO END 
:NOPARAMS 

ECHO Usage: BACK1 [DESTDRIVE] 
:END 

Here is RESTBIG. BAS. 

OPEN "ZIPFILE" FOR INPUT AS #1 

INPUT #1, DR$ 

INPUT #1, FILE$ 

CLOSE #1 

disknum% = 1 

GOSUB InsertNextDisk 

OPEN FILES FOR BINARY AS #1 

LEN = 512 
destpointer = 1 
TRANSFERS = SPACE$(512) 
CopyLoop: 



GET #2, srcpointer, TRANSFERS 
IF EOF(2) GOTO FileDone 
srcpointer = srcpointer + 512 
PUT #1, destpointer, TRANSFERS 
destpointer = destpointer + 512 
GOTO CopyLoop 
InsertNextDisk: 
ON ERROR GOTO 

InsertCorrectDisk 
BEEP 
PRINT "Insert disk number "; 

disknum%; " then press a 

key . . ." 
GOSUB WaitKey 
DN$ = STR$(disknum%) 
DRFILES = LEFT$(DR$, 2) + 

RIGHT$(DN$, 1) + FILES 
OPEN DRFILES FOR INPUT AS #2 
CLOSE #2 
OPEN DRFILES FOR BINARY AS #2 

LEN = 512 
srcpointer = 1 
RETURN 

InsertCorrectDisk: 
BEEP 
PRINT "Insert disk number "; 

disknum%; " then press a 

key . . ." 
GOSUB WaitKey 
RESUME 
FileDone: 
CLOSE #2 

ON ERROR GOTO DoneCopying 
DRFILES = LEFT$(DR$, 2) + 

"MOREFILZ" 
OPEN DRFILES FOR INPUT AS #2 
CLOSE #2 

disknum% = disknum% + 1 
GOSUB InsertNextDisk 
GOTO CopyLoop 
WaitKey: 
a$ = INKEYS 

IF a$ = "" GOTO WaitKey 
RETURN 
DoneCopying: 
CLOSE #1 
SYSTEM 

HereisREST1.BAT. 

@ECHO OFF 

ECHO. 

IF "%1"== "" GOTO NOPARAMS 

IF "%1"=="a:" GOTO BACKUP 

IF "%1"=="A: M GOTO BACKUP 

IF "%1"=="b:" GOTO BACKUP 

IF "%1"=="B:" GOTO BACKUP 

GOTO BADJ3RIVE 

:BACKUP 



CLS 

ECHO WARNING: Restore process 

ECHO may span multiple disks! 

ECHO. 

ECHO Insert first backup disk in 

ECHO drive %1. 

PAUSE 

ECHO. 

ECHO Restoring: D:\WORK\TELIX 

ECHO and subdirectories . . . 

ECHO. 

ECHO %1 > ZIPFILE 

ECHO TELIX.ZIP >> ZIPFILE 

QBASIC /RUN RESTBIG 

PKUNZIP -d -0 TELIX D:\WORK\ 

TEUX\ 

DEL TELIX.ZIP 
CLS 
ECHO. 

ECHO Restoring: D:\WORK\CHESS 
ECHO and subdirectories . . . 
ECHO. 

ECHO %1 > ZIPFILE 
ECHO CHESS.ZIP >> ZIPFILE 
QBASIC /RUN RESTBIG 
PKUNZIP -d -0 CHESS D:\WORK\ 

CHESSX 

DEL CHESS.ZIP 
:DONE 
CLS 
ECHO. 
ECHO Done! 
ECHO. 
GOTO END 
:BAD_DRIVE 
ECHO A hard disk is not 
ECHO supported as a destination. 
GOTO END 
:NOPARAMS 
ECHO Usage: REST1 

[SOURCEDRIVE] 
:END 

RICHARD C. LEINECKER 
REIDSVILLE, NC 



If you have an interesting tip 
that you think would help oth- 
er PC users, send it along 
with your name, address, and 
Social Security number to 
COMPUTE'S Tips & Tools, 
324 West Wendover Avenue, 
Suite 200, Greensboro, North 
Carolina 27408. For each tip 
we publish, we '11 pay you $25- 
$50. All tips submitted be- 
come the property of General 
Media International. D 



An update of last 
month's backup tip 
makes use 
of multiple disks. 



JUNE 1994 COMPUTE 



37 



ADVERTISEMENT 



TECHNOLOGY UPDATE 




1993 1998 2003 2008 2013 2018 2023 2028 2033 2038 2043 2048 2053 



Don't let your money run 
out before you do! 

Easy-to-use software tells you what to do novo in order to he 
secure in your retirement years. 



By Charles Anton 

Someone once said, "old age is not for 
sissies." In fact, retirement years c be 
fun. But not if you ignore your he^ • h- 
or your financial security! 

To help you plan for retirement, a team of 
leading financial planning experts and com- 
puter programmers at 
MacKenzie Systems got 
together over the last 
three years to create 
Destiny — a computer 
program that lets you 
take control of your 
own financial destiny. 

Top planners. The 

MacKenzie team, work- 
ing with a major retire- 
ment association, talked 
to hundreds of people 
from all walks of life. 
People as young as 
30, were beginning to 
worry about financial 
security for their retire- 
ment years. 

While Destiny's cal- 
culations are sophisti- 
cated, running the pro- 
gram for yourself is as 
easy as one, two, three. 
You are prompted to 
answer some key ques- 
tions and asked what 
expectations you have. 
Within a few seconds a 
spreadsheet and a series 
of graphs materialize 
with all the planning 
done for vou. 




Your own portfolio manager. 

With this program you can elect 
to have the personal Portfolio 
Manager take over. Whether you 
choose an aggressive approach, a stan- 
dard approach 
or even a more 
conservative 
approach, the 
manager auto- 
matically selects 
a relatively more conservative one as 
you get closer to retirement. 

Through Sector Management, the 
Portfolio Manager maintains a 

balance among high, moderate and 
low risk assets 
according to the 
allocation strat- 
egy that you 
choose. To main- 
tain the right 

balance of investments, the manager 

adjusts your portfolio as time goes by. 

No other program incorporates these 

sophisticated calculations. 




The Social Security myth. Most people 
know you can't rely on social security alone to 
meet retirement needs. Destiny can answer 
this problem and many others. It uses infor- 
mation such as age, the assets you already 
own, your investment strategy and expenses 
you might have along 
the way, such as tuition 
for your children. If 
you are already retired, 
Destiny can show you 
how much you can safe- 
ly spend each year. 
Can my money work 
harder? As recently re- 
ported on CNN, the most 
common mistake people 
make in managing their 
savings is being too 
conservative. Destiny 
allows you to see the 
impact of following a 
more aggressive savings 
strategy at a comfortable 
level of risk. 

By answering easy- 
prompts on your moni- 
tor, the program stores 
essential information 
such as your age, your 
income, your invest- 
ments and your assets. 
Then it tells you what 
you can expect to have in 
real dollars to take care 
of your security. If you'd 
like to change what the 
figures and graphs 
reveal for your future, 
you must go back to 




Before. Without a plan., 
you could run out of money. 



your original input and experiment with more 
'put aside' money so that future income will 
be adequate to your wishes. 

And inflation? Unfortunately, inflation is a 
fact of life. Inflation can be set at whatever 
level you estimate for the future in any plan 
you decide to follow. 

The results can change in seconds to color- 
ful graphs that tell exactly what to expect for 
each year of the future. Your retirement time, 
instead of being gray and uncertain, sudden- 
ly becomes cheerful, predictable and secure. 
Each projection could cost $1000. To 
have this personal information forecasted for 
any given situation by a financial advisor could 
cost up to S1000. 
However, because 
this program is 
a moveable feast, 
forecast-wise, you 
can have as many 
projections as you 
like at one low price. 

This offer is not 
available anywhere 
in the U.S. To intro- 
duce it to the public, 
Comtrad is offer- 
ing the MacKenzie 
Retirement System 
complete with pro- 
gram disk, owner's 
manual and work- 
book for the low 
introductory price 
of only $179, plus 
$12 shipping and 
handling. 

Risk-Free technology. The MacKenzie 
Retirement System is offered with a 30-day 'No 
Questions Asked" return policy by Comtrad 
Industries, one of America's largest mail order 
houses for the past 10 years. Don't miss this 
opportunity to predict your future. Most 
orders are processed within 72 hours. 

Free book makes you an expert. 

Order Destiny, and we'll send you the 
"Retirement Planning Workbook" abso- 
lutely free. It's not just another book about 
financial planning; its purpose is to 
increase your understanding of financial 
planning concepts. You'll also get an 
owner's manual and access to a technical 
question hotline. 

Required: PC/XT or higher; minimum 640 K mem- 
ory, a hard drive and MS-DOS 3.3 or higher. 

MacKenzie Retirement System S99 $6 S&H 

Please mention promotional VrWt j 302-CU1117 '. 
For fastest service, call toll free 24 hours a day. 

800-992-2966 




After. Careful planning 
lets you live comfortably, 
even in your later years. 



S 



To order by mail, send check or money order for the 
total amount or enclose your credit card number and 
expiration date (VA residents add 4.5% sales tax). 



INDUSTRIES 

2820 Waterford Lake Drive Suite 106 
Midlothian, Virginia 23223 



TECHNOLOGY UPDATE 




Could this be your dog? 

New product by Radio Fence creates a hidd en banier to ke ep your dog 
in your yard and out of trouble. Finally, you can protect your dog from 
traffic and other dangerous situations without locking him in a pen. 



By Cliarles Anton 



All dog owners have 
the same dilem- 
i ma. On one hand 
they want to give their dog 
the freedom to roam and 
exercise. On the other 
hand, they are worried 
about his safety. 

Up until now the only 
solution was to install a 
costly conventional fence. 
Not anymore! 
No leashes or cages. 
Now there's Radio Fence, 
the breakthrough alterna- 
tive for dog owners. Radio 
Fence is an underground 
electrical barrier which 
works with a receiver on 
your dog's collar. It beeps 
your dog when he nears 
the boundary and gives 
him a small electrical cor- 
rection if he tries to cross 
it. It keeps your dog safe 
and out of trouble without 
having to resort to expen- 
sive fences, runs ropes or 
chains that could injure 
your pet. 

A hidden barrier. Radio Fence acts as a hidden 
barrier that gives your dog access to the whole yard 
but inhibits his movements into unwanted areas. 
Your prize-winning rose garden or pool will be 
safe. Unlike standard fences, Radio Fence does not 
detract from the beauty of your home or lawn. 



A hidden barrier that only 
your dog knows is there- 
No more ugly, expensive fences 

■ No more restrictive enclosures 

■ No more ruined flower beds 
m No more knocked over trash cans 

■ No more complaining neighbors 

■ No more worrying about your 
dog's safety or protection 




Safety and freedom. 

Radio Fence will work 
with any size or breed 
of dog. The correction, 
which is similar to a 
static electricity charge, 
will not hurt your pet 
in any way. 

Plus Radio Fence 
meets all FCC require- 
ments, ensuring your 
dog's safety and giving 
you peace of mind. 
Custom boundary. 
With Radio Fence, you 
will receive 500 feet of 
wire that can be easily in- 
stalled in just two to three 
hours. The wire will ac- 
commodate up to a 
half-acre yard. The Radio 
Fence System also in- 
cludes a transmitter with 
a signal powerful enough 
to broadcast to approxi- 
mately two acres. If you 
want to expand your 
Radio Fence boundaries, 
simply order an addi- 
tional roll of wire. 

Easy training. By spending just fifteen min- 
utes a day working with your dog, he will be ful- 
ly trained in six to seven days. Radio Fence is more 
effective than other systems because it allows your 
pet to control the corrective treatment (which is 
definite but mild) and he soon learns to avoid it. 



Radio Fence creates a hidden barrier around 
your yard that safely contains your pet. 





.<4mm 





HOW DOES IT WORK? 



Mk crystal-tuned transmitter plugs into a standard outlet and emits 

^^^ a radio signal that travels along an underground wire. (The 

wire only needs to be buried an inch or two to prevent anyone from 

accidentally cutting or tripping over it.) The four-ounce receiver, 

worn on your pet's existing collar, picks up the radio signal and alerts 

him as he nears the hidden boundary that you have customized for 

your yard. If he crosses the boundary, he 
Keep your dog safe and out u ^ * 

of trouble with Radio Fence, will receive a small, electrical correction. 




chain link fence 
ladlo Fence 



You can train as many dogs as you want on the 
same system as long as they are each wearing 
a receiver collar. 

Affordable fence. The 

maintenance-free design, 
low initial investment, 
and ease of installation 
offer tremendous sav- 
ings. Other solutions 
could cost you thousands 
of dollars. Radio Fence is 
the economical and ef- 
fective alternative to 
unsightly fencing. 

Three easy payments of $66. To introduce 
this product, we are offering it directly to you for 
a limited time at a special price. If you order now, 
Radio Fence is yours for only $198. In fact, 
credit card customers can have the Radio Fence 
System in three easy monthly installments of $66 
(plus $16 S&H). To train more dogs on one Radio 
Fence System, order additional receivers for 
only $129 each, or you can make three payments 
of $43 (plus $8 S&H). 

Try it risk free. At Comtrad, we back all our 
products with a "No Questions Asked" money- 
back guarantee. If you're not completely satisfied 
for any reason, just return Radio Fence within 60 
days for a full refund. Radio Fence also comes 
with a one-year manufacturer's warranty and a 
one-year unconditional lightning warranty. 

Radio Fence. The Radio Fence System includes 
a transmitter, a lightweight receiver for your pet's 
collar, an antennae, the boundary cable and the 
complete installation and training manual. Plus, 
you'll receive a helpful video that will make 
installation and training extremely simple. 

Radio Fence System $198 $16S&h 

Additional Receiver... $129 $8 S&H 

Credit card customers 3 payment of $66 $16 S&H 

Please mention promotional code 032-CU1108. 
For fastest service call toll-free 24 hours a day 

800-992-2966 



To order by mail send check or money order for the 
total amount including S&H (VA residents add 4.5% 
sales tax). Or just charge it to your credit card, en- 
closing your account number and expiration date. 



INDUSTRIES 

2820 Waterford Lake Drive Suite 106 
Midlothian, Virginia 23113 



HARDWARE CLINIC 



Mark Minasi 



Multiply the speed of 
your computer 

by installing a clock- 
doubling chip. 



DOUBLE YOUR 
PLEASURE 

The eternal question among 
computer users who bought 
machines in the late 1980s is, 
What can you do with an old 
386 to jazz it up a bit? 

Get a new motherboard. If 
you've been reading this col- 
umn for the past few years, 
you know that I always recom- 
mend buying generic PCs so 
that motherboard upgrades 
are an option; if you buy from 
a maker of proprietary comput- 
ers, then your computer will 
have an oddly shaped case 
and motherboard, rendering it 
incapable of accommodating 
a replacement motherboard. 

But even if you can put a 
new motherboard in your com- 
puter, it'll cost about $300 to 
$800 for the board itself. And 
then you'll probably have to 
buy new RAM because the fast- 
er processor on the new moth- 
erboard will probably require 
it. Add the cost of eight 1MB 
SIMMs, and the upgrade 
price goes up about $250, mak- 
ing the total upgrade cost a 
minimum of $550 to $1,050. 
For turning your old 20-MHz 
386 into a 486DX2-66, $1,050 
isn't a bad price. It may not be 
within your budget, however. 

A less expensive answer is 
to replace your CPU with a 
clock-doubling chip. 

The notion of a clock dou- 
bler first appeared in 1991, 
when Intel announced the 
OverDrive and the 486DX2 
CPU chips. Computer buyers 
want greater and greater 
speed, and one of the most 
important determinants of com- 
puter speed is the CPU 
speed. Consequently, there is 
ongoing pressure on Intel and 
other chip companies to turn 
out faster and faster CPUs. 

While CPU speeds have in- 
creased tremendously, periph- 
eral speeds have not. Most 
PCs have a lopsided design 



that makes the wisdom of buy- 
ing ever-faster processors a 
bit suspect. For example, I 
have a 486DX-50 on my desk. 
Let's compare it to a 1984-mod- 
el XT. Speed benchmarks tell 
me that my CPU is 68 times 
faster than the XT's, and it can 
do floating-point calculations 
1214 times faster than the XT. 
Let's contrast that with anoth- 
er area of computer technolo- 
gy—printing. 

My laser printer prints 
about 270 characters per sec- 
ond (eight pages per minute, 
about 2000 bytes per page of 
text), in contrast to the 35-cps 
Spinwriter I used in 1984. As 
a result of the improvement in 
printer technology, my system 
is able to print about eight 
times faster than the XT. 

Now consider mass stor- 
age. The XT's hard disk had a 
seek time of about 90 ms and 
a data transfer rate of about 
150K per second. My more 
modern PC (which was, by the 
way, less expensive in 1993 
dollars than the XT was in the 
more valuable 1984 dollars) 
has an access time of 8.9 ms 
and a data transfer rate of 
1575K per second. Both print- 
ing and mass storage technol- 
ogy have gone through approx- 
imately a tenfold improvement 
over the past decade. 

In short, the newer PC has 
an engine that can put out 
about 70 times the horsepow- 
er, but its tires — the printer 
and hard disk— can only let it 
drive about 10 times faster. If 
we were looking to make a fast- 
er PC, we'd be better off if we 
got a disk drive with a 1.4-ms 
access time and a data trans- 
fer rate of about 10MB per sec- 
ond, and a printer that turns 
out 100 pages per minute. 

Before you point out that 
you have a disk drive that 
shows a 0.4-ms access time 
and a data transfer rate of 
6MB per second, look again. 
If your disk drive reports those 
statistics, then it probably has 



been equipped with some 
kind of cache. Caches render 
the results of disk benchmark 
programs nonsensical. 

If you want your computer 
to be faster, you should be 
spending your money on fast- 
er peripherals rather than fast- 
er CPUs. Having gotten that 
out of the way, however, let's 
see what your options are for 
getting faster CPUs into an ex- 
isting system. 

The best-known options are 
the Intel clock-doubling chips 
mentioned earlier They are on- 
ly usable in existing 486DX sys- 
tems. As Intel built faster and 
faster CPUs, it became a vic- 
tim of its own success. Why? 
A system's motherboard must 
run at the CPU's speed. The 
difficulty of building mother- 
boards increases exponential- 
ly as speeds rise, so moving 
from 12-MHz motherboards to 
25-MHz motherboards is 
much easier than moving 
from 25-MHz motherboards to 
50-MHz motherboards. Conse- 
quently, Intel's announced in- 
tention back in 1989 to offer a 
100-MHz 486DX "soon" 
caused engineers to worry. 
Could they build a 100-MHz 
system to wrap around the 
new chip? 

The answer to this conun- 
drum seemed to be a clock 
doubler — a chip that could 
run at high speeds but on 
slow motherboards. It accom- 
plished this by communicat- 
ing with the outside world (the 
motherboard) at one speed, 
then performing internal oper- 
ations at twice that speed. 

For example, the first of 
these chips released was the 
Intel 486DX2-50, which commu- 
nicates with a motherboard at 
25 MHz but operates internal- 
ly at 50 MHz. Specifically, an 
operation that does not re- 
quire outside data access, 
such as adding two numbers 
that are already contained in 
the processor's registers (regis- 
ters are very small areas of 



40 COMPUTE JUNE 1994 



Train at Home to Use a Personal 
Computer with CD-ROM 
and Multimedia! jM^ 



"M 




'■%, 



i 



Technology 



Video 



Word Processing! Spreadsheets! Database 
Management— and now CD-ROM and 
MULTIMEDIA...to get a better job that 
pays more money you need to learn 
computer skills with all these capabilities. 
Now you can get the training you need 
the feist, easy ICS way— at home. «J 

Be the PC Specialist in your office — the 
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The all-new ICS PC Specialist course 
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the world, all on your PC! 

• Plus you receive MS-DOS 6 
and Microsoft' Windows" 
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Learn how to use CD-ROM— the "hot" new 
technology that's sweeping the country! 

Thousands of CD-ROM disks are available 
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That's why we tea ch you how to get the mo st 
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But that's not all! This course includes a 
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Learn how to use video, audio, still 
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Multimedia is the wave of the future! 
Computer skills can help you make more 
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ICS can teach you the skills employers 
look for when they hire! 



Self Improvement^ Entertainment 

Knowledge 

Moving Images Sound & Musics 




Games 



CD-ROM and 

MULTIMEDIA turns your 

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You get this fast, powerful 
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HARDWARE CLINIC 



Clock doublets and 

clock triplers 

will speed up the 

processor, 

but your system 

may lag. 



memory in the CPU), executes 
at 50 MHz. An operation that 
requires outside access, 
such as writing or reading infor- 
mation to or from memory (in- 
cluding the program currently 
operating), happens at only 
25 MHz. 

You might think that since a 
normal CPU constantly access- 
es memory to read programs 
and data, most of the opera- 
tions would end up taking 
place at 25 MHz, and very few 
would run at 50 MHz. That 
would be true except for the ex- 
istence of a small area of mem- 
ory called a processor cache 
(which is generally 8K). Often- 
used code or data can be 
kept in the internal cache, al- 
lowing small programs to run 
entirely inside the CPU at 50 
MHz. (Communication to the 
external processor cache- 
tine 64K or 256K of cache re- 
ferred to in the computer ads — 
still operates, unfortunately, at 
25 MHz.) 

The beauty of the DX2 chip 
is that you can take an exist- 
ing 25-MHz 486DX, replace 
the CPU with a 486DX2, and 
instantly get a speed boost. It 
won't be a 100-percent speed 
boost, but the 60- to 80-per- 
cent improvement you'll see 
isn't bad. The processors are- 
n't inexpensive, however. A 50- 
MHz DX2 costs around $350 
(street price) and a 66-MHz 
DX2 costs around $500. 

Don't confuse a 486DX-50 
and a 486DX2-50; the DX-50 
is a 50-MHz chip that requires 
a 50-MHz motherboard, while 
the DX2-50 is a hybrid that 
runs at 50 MHz internally but 
only at 25 MHz on the mother- 
board. The DX2-66 will instant- 
ly upgrade any 33-MHz 
486DX machine. Unfortunate- 
ly, Intel doesn't offer an up- 
grade for the DX-50: there is 
no DX2-100. 

For those with 386DX sys- 
tems, there are clock doubler 
chips as well, but not from In- 
tel. These chips come from Cy- 



rix, makers of clones of Intel 
processors. The 386 clock dou- 
bler comes in two varieties, a 
386DX doubler and a 386SX 
doubler, respectively called 
the 486DRx2 and the 
486SRx2. These are not 486s, 
and they don't convert your 
386 to a 486, no matter what 
the writing on the outside of 
the box says. There's no math 
coprocessor and no 8K 
cache. There is a 1K cache 
built into these chips, which 
helps speed them up. That 
cache requires a driver to 
wake it up, so you have to 
install cache support software 
along with the chip. 

Installing the DRx2 is pretty 
easy. The 386-to-486 kit 
comes with a chip puller that 
makes extracting the old 386 
remarkably easy. (I say remark- 
ably easy because previously 
I've removed CPUs with a 
small screwdriver and a lot of 
patience. You see, you pry up 
one corner a trifle, then you 
move on to the next corner 
and pry it up a trifle, and so 
on. It works, but the chip pull- 
er is better.) 

What about installing an up- 
grade for a 386SX, though? 
Most 386SXs are surface- 
mount soldered right onto the 
motherboard, so no chip pull- 
er will be of help here. Cyrix 
has packaged its 386SX up- 
grade with a nifty piggyback 
package: You needn't remove 
the old CPU; you need only 
clip the CPU upgrade right on 
top of the existing chip. It's pret- 
ty easy. The result for a 386SX 
or 386DX is an improvement 
of about 50 to 80 percent, de- 
pending on which bench- 
marks you run. You can find 
the Cyrix upgrade kits from 
mail-order houses for about 
$250-$300, depending on 
what speed chip you need. At 
this writing, there are only 
clock doublers for 16-MHz 
and 25-MHz 386 systems (you 
can use the 25-MHz upgrade 
for 20-MHz systems); if you've 



got a 33-MHz system, then 
you'll have to wait until the 33- 
MHz clock doubler ships, and 
if you've got a 40-MHz 386, 
then you're out of luck, at 
least for the moment (but 
keep your eyes open). By the 
way, in most cases your cur- 
rent math coprocessor will con- 
tinue to work fine, if you've got 
one, but some really old 
387DX chips may not work 
with the doublers. If you've got 
an old 16-MHz 386 system, 
call Cyrix to find out if you'll 
have compatibility problems. 

Intel is not letting grass 
grow under its feet. It will soon 
ship a clock tripler, accelerat- 
ing 25-MHz 486 systems to 75 
MHz and 33-MHz systems to 
99 MHz (the ads will say 100 
MHz). Despite the fact that it's 
a clock tripler, the name of the 
chip is the 486DX4. I can't 
wait to pop one in my 33-MHz 
486DX server and watch it fly. 

There's more to the DX4 
than just clock tripling. For one 
thing, Intel went back to the 
drawing board and rede- 
signed much of the chip from 
scratch, yielding a chip that 
runs cooler than the DX2. 
That's particularly important 
for laptop users: I know of 
some DX2 laptops that have ac- 
tually had keys on the key- 
board melt because of the 
heat of the processor. Further, 
the DX4 doesn't have 8K but 
rather 16K of internal cache. 

Should you buy a doubler 
or a tripler? It depends on 
what you're doing, and what 
your system looks like current- 
ly. If you're doing graphical 
things, then spending $300 to 
upgrade to a very fast video 
card may be a better buy. If 
you're running Windows on a 
4MB machine, then upgrad- 
ing to 8MB will probably pro- 
duce better speed improve- 
ments. But for a kick in raw 
processing power, it's proba- 
bly worth getting the doublers. 
They're reasonably priced 
and very compatible. O 



42 COMPUTE JUNE 1994 



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I 




Choosing a f\[ 



v~.ui/iraiiig ci ■ ■ wanted a new computer with a bility, you can rest easy: any x86 chip 

■ . V^r blazingly hot central processing you buy today will be able to run your 

Chip Can SeeiTI unit (CPU), you just bought one with software. 

■ Inters newest record breaker, and all A much harder question to answer 

r'fitTinl IPPltPfi was right - Those c!a y s are 9° ne - Now, is how fast these chips are when com- 

V.VJI ll|JII V.CIHTU, y0(J have tQ face an a |ph a bet soup of pared to one another. This becomes 

- it i chip makers: Advanced Micro especially perplexing given the names 

Lit clll VOU HclVe Devices (AMD), Cyrix, Texas that chips go by these days. For 

1 % Instruments, and even IBM. Making example, a Cyrix Cx486SLC has 486 

tO fJO IS 3Sk matters even more confusing, Intel is in its name, but it acts like a 32-bit 486 

i\J \avj 13 C13IY proc | UC j n g a bewildering array of only when the data is actually inside 

\fr\uvm\f lA/U-if chips. And ; as if that weren't bad the chip. For data input and output, it 

yOUrSeiT WlTcH enough, there are all these exotic relies on a 16-bit bus. So why bother 

chips like the PowerPC and the Alpha, with it? The Cx486SLC is priced and 
VOU riGGO which just might represent the future marketed to compete not against 
7 v.k.**. ofcomputJn g i486s. but i386SXs. Cyrix makes no 
What's a buyer to do? Well, fasten bones about this: The SLC is meant to 
your seat belt, because we're off on a be today's low-end chip, not a middle- 
full-speed-ahead journey into the land of-the-road 486 competitor. The newer 



Know what 



ieed out of your chip, all 



The Basics 



>x4bbbLuz cnips nave speeas l 
>0 MHz and a 32-bit external bus. 

Another concern many users s 
3 that their chip vendors might g 
i smoke one day because of laws 



ers give their chips names that make chip makers are becoming more com- 

them sound compatible with Intel mon r it's unlikely that any of the major 

chips. But how do you know that the vendors will be driven out of business. 

x86 chips from all these vendors will Most of the judicial battles have been 

really be compatible with your DOS won by the smaller companies, and 

and Windows programs? I was unable there's little to show that the trend 

to find solid claims of any major pro- might reverse. 

gram or operating system failing on Cyrix will continue to make Intel- 

anv of the non-Intel chins. In mv test- compatible CPUs. Intel, in the face of 



By Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols 










ss&r* 



PFW . 



agreed in February to a settlement. 
While Intel may yet appeal some of the 
decisions that have gone against it, it 
now seems clear that Cyrix will be in 
the x86 chip business for the long haul. 

Good Chips, Good Decisions 

If you're like most PC buyers, you're 
probably asking yourself, "How can I 
pick the right CPU?" There is no right 
or wrong CPU. The only question is 
whether the chip you select will deliv- 
er the performance you require. But 
before we talk about chips, you have 
to realize that the CPU is oniy part of 
the story. Overall system performance 
should concern you more than CPU 
performance. 

Before you go out and buy a sys- 
tem, get all the information you can on 
its overall track record. Remember 
that a computer can perform only as 
fast as its slowest component. The 
components that can make a comput- 
er look like either a snail or a lightning 
bolt are the video card and the hard 
disk; their speeds vary the most. 

A standard benchmark for video 
card performance is the WinMark. It's 
possible to cheat on the WinMark 
(some video card manufacturers are 
alleged to have built in circuitry that 
checks to see whether WinMark is 



running and, if it is, generates impres- 
sive results), so the numbers generat- 
ed by the test aren't foolproof. Also, 
there are different versions of 
WinMark available, which might gen- 
erate different ratings. But generally, a 
rating above 12 million would indicate 
a fast video card, and a rating below 
8 million would indicate a card with 
dismal performance. More and more, 
manufacturers are installing slow 
v.ideo to keep system prices low. 
Watch out for that practice. 

You don't want to buy a hard disk 
with an access time of 40 millisec- 
onds or above. When you buy a sys- 
tem, get the fastest hard disk avail- 
able and install caches to speed it up 
even more. Generally, disk compres- 
sion doesn't appreciably change a 
hard disk's performance. 

You will want to buy a system with 
an EISA expansion bus and probably 
a VL-bus (VESA local bus) or PCI bus 
(Intel local bus) unless your work 
doesn't depend on a high-speed bus. 

You'll want to buy a system with 
the fastest RAM available that you can 
afford. Even very fast RAM might have 
trouble keeping up with the hottest 
CPUs available, and for that reason, 
you should also look for systems with 
secondary caches of very fast memo- 



ry — a cache of 256K is a minimum. 

A good system is like a good team: 
It must be made up of good individual 
performers. A hot CPU will chill out if it's 
part of a low-performing team. But once 
you've made sure your system has 
what it takes, it's time to choose a CPU, 
and that's what this feature is about. 
The broad range of chips can generally 
be broken down into low-end, middle- 
of-the-road, and hot performers. We'll 
cover each of these in turn. 

The Low End 

A 486 may be nice, but when your 
bank account is more important than 
your megaflops (a measure of CPU 
speed expressed in millions of floating- 
point operations per second), a 386 
computer can still fill the bill. Here, your 
choices come down to Intel, AMD, and 
a pair of low-end Cyrix chips. 

Intel still offers its 386DX and 386SX 
chips, but the real winner here is AMD. 
AMD's 40-MHz Am386DX-40 and 
Am386DXL-40 are the fastest 386 
chips on the market. You'll find the 
Am386DX-40 in desktop machines, 
while the DXL, which uses only 3.3 volts 
of electricity, is usually found in laptops. 

You might also want to consider 
systems with a Cyrix Cx486SLC. It 
comes in speeds of up to 33 MHz. In 




some ways, this chip is an odd duck. 
It's a perfect fit for an i386SX socket, 
but internally, it works like an i486SX. 
Unfortunately, although manufacturers 
find building a system around the 
Cx486SLC simple because of its 
386SX compatibility, these systems 
are stuck with the 386SX's slow 16-bit 
external data bus. 

Inside the Cx486SLC (and its low- 
powered laptop brother, the 
Cx486SLCe), there's a 32-bit data 
path and a 1K internal cache. It's a 
tiny cache, but it does improve the 
Cx486SLC's performance. The chip 
includes the entire i486SX instruction 
set. Nor is the Cx486SLC a mere 
i486SX copy internally. It goes 
beyond the i486SX by including its 
own caching and power management 
instructions. 

While the Cx486SLC doesn't com- 
pare well against the 486SX in terms 
of performance, it's another story 
when comparing it to the 386. Here, 
the top-of-the-line 33-MHz Cx486SLC 
fares well against the fastest Intel and 
AMD 386 chips. 

The next Cyrix chip family, the 
Cx486DLC, zips past the 386 chips. 
Although it's pin compatible with a 
386DX socket, the Cx486DLC comes 
with an i486SX instruction set with 32- 



bit internal and external data paths 
and a 1K cache. Like the i486SX, the 
Cx486DLC doesn't have a math 
coprocessor. While the Cx486DLC 
blows the doors off 386DX chips, it's 
more of a dead heat between the 
Cx486DLC and the 486SX family. 

The bottom line on these low-end 
chips is that the DLC demands your 
attention for fast 386-level perfor- 
mance. If cost is a serious issue, the 
AMD 386 or the Cx486SLC should be 
your first choice. 

The Middle of the Road 

Did you ever think you'd see the day 
when an Intel 33-MHz 486DX would be 
thought of as an average chip? That 
day is here. Still, even power users 
shouldn't overlook the i486 family. With 
the exception of such advanced oper- 
ating systems as NextStep and 
Windows NT, aimost no software seri- 
ously pushes the limits of a fast 486. 

Any discussion of 486s must start 
with the Intel family. These chips, with 
their internal and external 32-bit data 
buses and 8K caches, still define 
today's computing. The i486DX CPUs 
range from 25 MHz to 50 MHz. The 
33-MHz i486DX is by far the most 
popular member of the family. This is 
because of the perception that the 25- 



MHz i486DX is too slow for the jobs 
requiring a 486. The 50-MHz model 
suffers from overheating to this day. In 
addition, Intel is swinging its empha- 
sis for high-end computing from the 
50-MHz chips to the Pentium. 

Edging in on Intel's territory, AMD 
and Cyrix are now serious contenders 
in the 486 wars as well. 

AMD led the assault on the i486. 
For years, Intel and AMD have 
slugged it out in court. One legal chal- 
lenge has to do with whether AMD 
can use Intel microcode; the other 
challenge is whether AMD can pro- 
duce 486s using clean-room tech- 
niques. In clean-room engineering, 
engineers produce a chip that's simi- 
lar to the original but not based on the 
original design. Rather than cloning 
the chip, the clean-room engineers try 
to create a chip that reproduces the 
original chip's actions and reactions. 
Intel's contention is that AMD doesn't 
have the right to do either. 

Despite Intel's opinion, AMD will 
soon have not one, but two, full lines 
of 486 chips: one using Intel micro- 
code and the other using code creat- 
ed using clean-room techniques. If 
Intel wins its suit claiming that AMD 
has no right to use its microcode in its 
486DX chips, AMD will be prepared to 



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switch its 486DX to code developed 
using clean-room techniques. 

Today, there is an AMD alternative 
to virtually all i486 chips. For the 
J486DX-33, there's the Am486DX-33; 
for the i486SX-33, there's the 
Am486SX-33; and so on. The only 
Intel CPU for which AMD has yet to 
develop a direct competitor is the 
J486DX-50 chip. 

In addition to the Intel twins, AMD 
also makes several chips that don't 
have Intel counterparts: the 40-MHz 
Am486 CPU family. In this group, 
you'll find both SX and DX versions. 
AMD also makes low-voltage chips 
that use an SMM compatible with 
Microsoft APM-aware applications 
(APM and SMM are explained in the 
sidebar titled "Chiptionary"). Some of 
these chips, like the 33-MHz 
Am486DXLV (pin compatible with the 
i486DX-33) can be powered down to 
a complete stop without losing data. 
Clearly, these chips will soon be pop- 
ping up in laptops and green (envi- 
ronmentally friendly) PCs. 

AMD is taking the offensive in the 
486 wars. Compaq, the second- 
largest manufacturer of IBM-compati- 
ble PCs, is expected to be making 
systems built around AMD chips by 
the time you read this. 

The Cyrix Cx486S series is pin 
compatible with the i486SX, and in 
most ways the Cx486S chips work just 
like their Intel equivalents. The most 
important difference, however, is that 
the Cx486S has only a 2K internal 
cache (the i486SX has an 8K internal 
cache). On the plus side, Cyrix's 
chips can slow down to a dead stop 
without losing information. This 
makes the Cx486S a natural for 
laptop vendors. Cyrix, like AMD 
also has a 40-MHz i486SX-style 
chip for which Intel has no 
equivalent. 

Cyrix also makes 
486DX chips. The Cyrix 
Cx486DX50, 
Cx486DX40, and 
Cx486DX33 have 
32-bit data paths 
and 8K caches 
just like their 
Intel coun- 
terparts. 



Double Time 

The newest trend in 486s is the clock 
doubler. This is a chip that transmits 
and receives data at one speed and 
processes data internally at another 
speed that's twice the input/output 
speed. For example, a 25/50-MHz 
i486DX2 takes in and sends out data 
at 25 MHz. Inside the same chip, the 
data is processed at 50 MHz. 

Once more, Intel leads the way in 
chip progress. The company's 
i486DX2 comes in models that run at 
25/50 MHz and 33/66 MHz. Like their 
DX brothers, these chips come with 8K 
caches, built-in FPUs (see the sidebar 
titled "Chiptionary"), and 32-bit data 
paths. If you want Intel reliability and a 
strong processor, the 33/66-MHz 
i486DX2 demands your attention. 

By the time you read this, AMD 
and Cyrix will each have a DX2 
chip. This time, though, they're 
not the only major players 
Texas Instruments (Tl) and 
IBM are also in this round. 

AMD offers both 25/50 
and 33/66-MHz proces- 
sors. AMD is also 
developing a 486SX- 
style clock dou 
b I e r — t h e 
Am486SX2-50. 
With the ex- 
ception of 
this last 
chip 
t h e 



AMD models look and act like the 
equivalent Intel chips. 

Cyrix also has its clock dou 
biers in 25/50 and 33/66 
brands. The Cx486DX2s 
differ from Intel's and 
AMD's in two ways 
First, the Cyrix chips 
use 8K write-back 
caches. In write- 
back caches 
the tiny cache 
holds data 
until the 
system 
is re" 




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atively idle before committing the 
data to main memory or disk. 
This results in a small but per- 
ceptible performance boost. 
The other difference is that 
Cyrix claims its built-in 
FPU is faster than 
those used in equiva- 
lent 486s. 

Texas In- 
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own clock-doubling 486s: the 
486SXLC2s. These chips, like the 
Cx486SLC, fit into 386SX sockets and 
use the 486SX instruction set. The 
important difference here is that the 
SXLC2 has an 8K cache. This chip 
comes in 20/40-MHz and 25/50-MHz 
flavors. 

The SXLC is not the end of the Tl 
486 story. Tls Rio Grande project will 
produce chips that combine the 
25/50-MHz TI486SXLC2's core with a 
memory controller and a Peripheral 
Component Interconnect (PCI) local- 
bus controller. Throw in low power 
consumption and size, and Tl should 
establish the standard high-end chip 
for notebook and laptop computing 
for the rest of the year. 

IBM has the fastest 486-style CPU 
of all. The company's Blue Lightning 
chip is a clock-tripling microproces- 
sor. To communicate with the rest 
of the computer, the Blue 
Lightning runs at 33 MHz, but 
internally, it blasts along at 
99 MHz. In addition, the 
Blue Lightning has a 
16K cache — twice as 
large as those of its 
competitors. 

The Blue 
Lightning has 
only one dis- 
advantage: 
It doesn't 
come 
with a 



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built-in math coprocessor. Still, if your 
applications don't need FPU power, a 
Blue Lightning-equipped PC is the cur- 
rent 486 power champ. Its reign may 
not last long, though. AMD will soon 
enter the lists with its own clock-tripling 
CPU, and Intel plans to release a clock 
tripler called (confusingly enough) the 
DX4. The DX4 will be available in 75-, 
83-, and 100-MHz speeds. 

The Replaceable; 

Not everyone can afford to buy a new 
computer every time the industry has 
a new champion. If you're in that situ- 
ation, you're in luck. Cyrix offers sev- 
eral upgrade chips, and there's 
always the shimmering promise of 
Pentium upgradability. 

The CxDRx 2 gives users a single- 
chip solution for upgrading 386DX 
computers. This clock-doubled 486 
CPU fits into the 386 socket and 
brings with it 32-bit addressing and a 
1K cache. The closest relative to this 
chipistheCx486DLC, 

These chips can give 16-, 20-, and 
25-MHz 386DXs new life. The Cyrix 
CPUs run internally at twice the speed 
of the chips they're replacing. 
Unfortunately, while Cyrix will be bring- 
ing out 386DX replacement chips, 
there are no current plans for 33- or 
40-MHz 386SX replacement CPUs. 

The replacement chips that most 
people know about are Intel's 
OverDrive chips. An OverDrive chip 
boosts a standard 486SX or 486DX to 
486DX2 performance and speeds. Also 
promised is a next-generation 
OverDrive chip based on Pentium tech- 
nology that will boost 486DX and 
486DX2 systems to new performance 
levels. 

Also coming from Intel is a 
Pentium upgrade chip for 486 
machines with special Pen- 
tium upgrade sockets. The 
chip is currently called 
the P24T, and it is 
expected to run at 
speeds up to 100 
MHz. System 
buyer beware: 
Many systems 
with Pentium 
upgrade 
sockets 
will not 



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be able to use the new chip because 
of system design. Intel has started an 
Intel Compatibility Lab to certify sys- 
tems as P24T-ready. The chip is 
expected to be a fully functioning 
Pentium except that it will have a 32- 
bit data bus instead of the Pentium's 
standard 64-bit data bus. Is the 
rumored 486 OverDrive chip the same 
thing as the chip now known as the 
P24T? Only time will telL 

The High End 

At the high end, the Intel Pentium 
stands alone, at least for now. The 
Pentium, with its 60- to 66-MHz clock 
speed, runs much faster than any 
other chip in the x86 family. Pentiums 
with speeds of 90 and 100 MHz 
should be appearing as you read this. 
But pure MHz numbers tell only 
part of the story. The Pentium's 
advanced design, with its superscalar 



architecture, dual 8K caches, and two 
integer execution units, breaks all for- 
mer x86 architecture speed records. 
How good is it? With plain, old soft- 
ware, a 66-MHz Pentium is almost 
twice as fast as an i486DX2-66. Give 
the Pentium some software that's 
been optimized for it, and it will leave 
the other xB6 chips in the dust. 

Recent releases from Intel 
describe the 90- and 100-MHz 
Pentiums as the most powerful chips 
on the market. The 66-MHz Pentium is 
expected to be the midrange CPU in 
a year, and the clock-tripled DX4 will 
be the standard for mobile computing. 
These same releases speak tantaliz- 
ingly of a P6, a new high-end chip to 
replace the Pentium. 

Roaring up to challenge the 
Pentium is AMD's clock-tripled 486 
and Cyrix's M1 chip (at the time this is 
being prepared, M1 is the code name 



Microscope on CPUs 



What are the features to bear in 
mind when selecting a PC based on 
its CPU or when selecting a CPU for 
an upgrade? AMD spokesperson 
David Frink and Cyrix spokesperson 
Katherin Dockerill list the following. 

• Price 

• Speed 

• Internal bus width 

• External bus width 

• Size of internal cache 

• Clock doubling 

• Microcode 

• Compatibility 

AMD and Cyrix have based their 
success on undercutting Intel prices 
and matching the speed of Intel 
chips, internal and external bus 
widths are determined by the 
requirements of your system. 
Remember, though, that 386SX 
chips have 32-bit internal buses and 
16-bit external buses. The 386DX 
and all 486 chips have 32-bit inter- 
nal and external buses. "An 8K inter- 
nal cache is considered an industry 
standard [for 486s]," Frink says. 
Although some 386 replacement 
chips have 1K internal caches, you 
should always make sure a 486 chip 
has an 8K (or larger) internal cache. 

By the time you read this, AMD 
will have released a clock-doubled 
Am486SX-50 chip that is expected 
to drive the cost of 486SX systems to 
the current level of 386 systems 
while giving them processor speeds 
that can compete with 486DX chips, 
Intel is expected to introduce a simi- 
lar chip iate in the spring. But don't 
count the 386 out yet. AMD sold 1 .5 



million 386 chips in the last quarter 
of 1 993 and expected to sell another 
1 .5 million in the first quarter of 1994. 

Another interesting development 
is the clock-doubled version of 
AMD's 40-MHz chips, providing 80- 
MHz performance. 

Microcode refers to the hard- 
wired instructions within the CPU— 
the software that tells the chip what 
to do with the information it receives. 

Compatibility comes last be- 
cause chip makers ensure that their 
chips are completely compatible 
with those of industry leader Intel 
before they leave the design stage. 
"People don't buy a system based 
on the internal workings of the CPU 
but based on whether it runs soft- 
ware," Frink says. 

The AMD K5 chip (the Pentium 
competitor) will operate on 3.3 volts 
and feature a static clock, which 
means that the chip can literally shut 
itself down without data loss in be- 
tween keystrokes, or any other time 
it's idle. This should significantly 
reduce power consumption and 
heat, the twin bugbears of superfast 
CPUs. The K5 will be based entirely 
on AMD-developed architecture and 
microcode. 

The Pentium will run x86 code at 
standard 486 speed; the code must 
be recompiled with a compiler opti- 
mized for the Pentium to achieve 
speeds faster than that. But Cyrix's 
M1 processor will run existing x86 
code at higher speeds without 
recompiling. 

—ROBERT BIXBY 



for the Cyrix Pentium challenger; the 
chip's name could change by the time 
it's released on the market). AMD is 
also working on a direct challenger to 
the Pentium known (at least for now) as 
the K5. Details on these chips are 
sketchy at press time, but you can 
safely assume that the new CPUs will 
perform at speeds close to the 60-MHz 
Pentiums, though the manufacturers 
like to say, "Pentium performance or 
better." One stated that a 100-MHz 
Pentium challenger would appear. 

Raising the Roof 

The x86 family is no longer the only 
game in town. RISC chips are rushing 
out from the workstation world to 
assault the PC's CISC land (RISC and 
CISC are both explained in the side- 
bar titled "Chiptionary"). Why, after 
attempts to enter the PC market that 
were so feeble that almost no one 
noticed, are RISC chips now becom- 
ing a factor in the PC market? The 
answer is Windows NT. Windows NT 
is a PC user-friendly operating system 
that doesn't run just on PCs. 

Leading the way is the Alpha chip 
from Digital Equipment Company 
(DEC). The Alpha 21064 can run as 
fast as 200 MHz (DEC has promised 
even higher speeds to come). In addi- 
tion to speed, it offers 64-bit internal 
and external buses and a 16K internal 
cache. The Alpha is simply the fastest 
PC chip in the land. It won't run stan- 
dard DOS, but a special form of 
Windows NT has been written for the 
Alpha, and you can run DOS software 
under Windows NT, so an Alpha 
machine could be considered as an 
alternative to a standard PC (though a 
very expensive one). 

A company named MIPS is also 
demanding attention with its R4000 
series. The 64-bit R4000 chips can 
run as fast as 150 MHz and have up 
to a 32K internal cache. You may 
never have heard of MIPS, but its 
chips have what it takes to make an 
impact on at least the network server 
side of the PC world. Nintendo plans 
to use MIPS chips in its high-end 
game machines starting in 1995, so 
you may encounter them there, if 
nowhere else. 

As fast and powerful as the Alpha 
and the R4000 are, the chip that really 
has the Intel-bound contingent of PC 
users talking is the PowerPC. This 
chip family has the backing of three of 
the PC's superpowers: Apple, IBM, 
and Motorola. 

The PowerPC 601, the first of the 
series, will soon be appearing in 
shops everywhere as the heart of the 
new PowerPC Macintoshes. This chip 
boasts a 32K cache, 64-bit internal 



50 COMPUTE JUNE 1994 



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APM. Advanced Power Manage- 
ment. APM is an Intel/Microsoft 
application program interface (API) 
that enables programs to slow down 
a computer's components when 
they aren't needed. 

CISC. Complex Instruction Set 
Computer. This kind of chip, like all 
the Intel processors and Motorola's 
680x0 chips, has a large number of 
instructions embedded into the 
microcode. This makes the chips 
easier to program for, but their com- 
plex designs are harder to upgrade. 

clock doubler. Some chips, 
known as clock doubters, take data 
in and out at one speed but process 
the data inside the chip at double 
that speed. The advantage is that 
CPU-intensive programs, like graph- 
ics, run much faster. The newer clock 
triplers go even faster by running 
internally at triple their I/O speeds. 

external cache. The external 
cache is also known as the L2 
cache. You probably know that 
caches, like SMARTDrive, hold data 
in memory so that your CPU can get 
to it faster than by going to your 
hard drive or floppy drive. You may 
not know that main memory itself is 
not fast enough to keep up with your 
CPU's never-ending hunger for 
data. To feed your CPU the data it 
needs, many computer manufactur- 
ers put in small amounts of very 
fast — and expensive — RAM that 



Chiptionary 

stores data for quicker access by 
the CPU. Typically, external caches 
are 128K to256K in size. 

FPU. See math coprocessor. 

Internal cache. The internal 
cache is also known as the L1 
cache. Some chips have a tiny 
amount of very fast RAM on the 
chips themselves. This internal 
cache RAM, typically from 1K to 
16K, holds data and instructions 
from main memory. By storing this 
data in ultrafast memory within the 
CPU, the chip is able to work more 
efficiently. 

math coprocessor. Math co- 
processors, also known as floating- 
point units (FPUs), quickly perform 
math calculations that normal CPUs 
don't do well. To make these float- 
ing-point calculations zoom, you 
need either a chip with a. math 
coprocessor built in (like the 
i486DX) or a math coprocessor chip 
(such as the i387) to work in tandem 
with your main CPU. One note of 
caution: Math coprocessors do not. 
normally help spreadsheet or finan- 
cial software; graphics and 
CAD/CAM programs (like AutoCAD) 
benefit from a math coprocessor. 

microcode. A chip's basic 
operating instructions. 

pin compatible. A chip is said 
to be pin compatible when its pins 
will exactly match up with the socket 
openings for another chip. For 



instance, a Cyrix Cx486S is pin 
compatible with sockets designed 
for an i486SX CPU. 

RISC. Reduced Instruction Set 
Computer. This kind of chip has a 
simple design with few microcode 
instructions, thereby making for more 
efficient computers. While more diffi- 
cult to program for than CISC chips, 
RISC chips can be quickly upgrad- 
ed. In short, in the race between 
CISC and RISC for CPU dominance, 
many designers believe that RISC 
must eventually win out. 

SMM. System Management Mode. 
Chips with SMM, like the IBM 386SL, 
can respond to APM instructions, 

superscalar. A computing 
method in which several instructions 
are run at once on a chip's parallel 
processors. This is a common tech- 
nique in RISC designs to speed up 
calculations. 

x-bit architecture. When sales- 
people talk about a system with 16- 
bit, 32-bit, or 64-bit architecture, 
they're referring to the maximum data 
block size that can be processed by 
the CPU. With most chips the num- 
bers are the same. For example, a 
286 has a 16-bit data throughput and 
works internally with 16-bit chunks of 
data. The 386SX and most Pentium 
systems don't do this. The 386SX can 
take in and push out data only in 16- 
bit pieces, even though the data is 
processed internally as 32-bit chunks. 



and external data buses, and 66-MHz 
speed. Although comparing CPUs of 
different types isn't easy (comparing 
clock speeds alone isn't enough 
because some chips accomplish 
more tasks per cycle than others), the 
601 seems to improve on the 66-MHz 
Pentium's performance. 

Things will only continue to get 
faster from there. The big three are 
already planning faster 601s. The 
PowerPC 603, with its low power con- 
sumption, will bring Pentium-level 
power to laptops. Past that, the 604 
will bring even more power to desktop 
machines by early 1995. About the 
same time, the 620 will also appear in 
servers and multiprocessor systems. 

Buying Choices 

What does it all mean for you? It 
depends on your needs. There are 
some things that you can't have. For 
instance, you can't buy a computer 
that won't be out-of-date in three years 
(maybe less). Computers are advanc- 
ing too fast for anyone to stay on tech- 

52 COMPUTE JUNE 1994 



nology's ever-sharper leading edge. 

If your aim is to get the least 
expensive computer you can find that 
will run Windows, machines packing 
the AMD 40-MHz Am386DX and the 
Cyrix Cx486SLC and Cx486DLC are 
worthy contenders for your dollars. 
Are your favorite applications pro- 
grams like WordPerfect 5.1, dBASE IV 
2.0, and Lotus 1-2-3 2.2? If so, con- 
sider any of the Intel and AMD 
386DXs. A machine with a 386SX at 
its heart is now at the end of its useful 
lifespan, and it's not a good buy. 

If you have a few thousand dollars 
earmarked for your next computer, con- 
sider a machine with a 33-MHz Intel 
486DX, a 40-MHz 486DX, or any of the 
clock-doubled AMD, Intel, or Cyrix 
chips. You may want to avoid chips that 
don't include FPUs. Most of the time, 
you're not likely to use an FPU, but they 
sure are handy when you do need 
them. Some high-end design programs 
make extensive use of the FPU and 
may slow to a crawl without it. 

At the high end, the Pentium almost 



has to be your choice today. The 66- 
MHz Pentium is more valuable than the 
60-MHz, and its price should be drop- 
ping by the time you read this. Even the 
100- and 90-MHz Pentiums will proba- 
bly come down in price in a year or so. 

That's the safe solution. If you want 
to live more dangerously, go with a 
brand-new 100-MHz Pentium, a Cyrix 
M1, or an AMD K5. You can be the 
first in your town to boldly go where 
no computer user has gone before. 

For the truly adventurous, the RISC 
chips beckon. If looking for a server is 
the name of your game, both the 
MIPS and the DEC chips are real pos- 
sibilities. The PowerPCs, with their 
ability to run almost any microcomput- 
er operating system in existence 
today, also look like winners, Mac- 
intosh users will have little choice 
about switching over to RISC, since 
all future Macs will be PowerPC 
based. That may not be a bad deal 
though, and PC users should consid- 
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COMPUTE'S GETTING STARTED WITH 



PC SOUND 



WHY BUY A SOUND 
CARD? 

If your computer isn't 
equipped with sound, you're 
not getting everything you 
could out of your computing 
experience. If you play com- 
puter games or your kids 
use educational programs, 
using your PC's internal 
speaker is like always eating 
unbuttered toast— you can 
do it, but you don't get as 
much out of the experience 
as you could. 

There is, of course, more 
to PC sound than games. 
Music adds to almost any 
experience; a PC equipped 
to play music takes on new 
dimensions. If you have any 
interest in music composi- 
tion or learning the mechan- 
ics of music, you can get 
software (sometimes bun- 
dled with the sound card) 
that records music in stan- 
dard notation as you play it. 
If you have a CD-ROM 
drive, you can play stan- 
dard audio CDs through the 
computer as you use it to 
do other work (just as I'm 
doing as I write this). 

Musicians and recording 
hobbyists can inexpensively 
create entire professional 
sound-mixing studios with 
their PCs. 

And finally, voice pro- 
cessing is in the wings, 
waiting to become a major 
part of many PC users' 
lives. You can buy sound 
cards today that also serve 
as small telephone-answer- 
ing and voice-mail systems. 
In business, voice annota- 
tion of documents is possi- 
ble now with dedicated 
equipment; it might become 
an important factor in future 
PC use. 

Voice recognition also 
seems a likely candidate for 
popularity. A current edition 
of Interplay's game Star 
Trek: 25th Anniversary, for 
instance, responds to voice 
commands (if you have the 




CONTENTS 

WHY BUY A SOUND CARD? 55 

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT SOUND 
CARDS 55 

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT DSP CHIPS 
.....58 

HOW TO MAKE THE BEST SOUND RECORDINGS 
60 

HOW TO SET UP A MIDI MUSIC STUDIO 61 

PC SOUND GLOSSARY 63 

COMPUTE'S Getting Started with PC Sound was 
written by Richard 0. Mann and David English. 



right sound card). When 
you say, "Beam me up, 
Scotty," or "Warp 3, Mr. 
Sulu," the game obeys your 
command. 

Software developers are 
also saying that voice-to- 
text dictation isn't that far 
off — you'll dictate letters 
and memos, watching the 
words appear onscreen as 
you speak them. 

Making a Sound Choice 

Unfortunately, buying a 
sound card isn't easy. While 
there are no real standards 
in PC sound, a few de facto 
standards keep total chaos 
at bay. The technology 



seems' to change monthly, 
as newer cards with more 
and better features appear 
at ever-falling prices. If your 
sound card is at least a year 
old, you may want to 
upgrade to one of the new 
flashy, feature-laden boards. 
Because there's so 
much to know about sound 
cards, we've attempted to 
sort through the technical 
details, explain the impor- 
tant matters to you, and 
then tell you about a 
selection of the market- 
leading cards, along with 
the more interesting tech- 
nical innovations. 

— Richard O. Mann 



WHAT YOU NEED TO 
KNOW ABOUT SOUND 
CARDS 

Before we get into actual 
sound card listings, we 
need to cover a few techni- 
cal details. When you move 
beyond simple gaming 
functions, certain factors 
gain importance. 

In the matter of 8-bit ver- 
sus 16-bit hardware, the 
battle is long since over. 
You can still buy 8-bit 
cards, but not for long. This 
bit count refers to the num- 
ber of digital bits used to 
record a single sound sam- 
ple. In an 8-bit card, you 
can create 256 sounds from 
a single sample. With 16-bit 
sound, the number of possi- 
ble sounds expands to over 
65,000 per sample. (A sam- 
ple is an instantaneous 
snapshot of the sound, 
much like a frame in a 
movie, only played back 
thousands of times faster.) 
In other words, buy a 16-bit 
board. 

The number of voices or 
channels is also important. 
A 12-voice card plays 12 
sound elements at once to 
create its sound; if it were 
an orchestra, you'd have 12 
instruments. The more voic- 
es, the more rich and full 
the sound will be. 

Families of Sound 
Cards 

The Sound Blaster fam- 
ily- (Creative Labs, 800- 
998-5227) The Creative 
Labs lineup includes six 
sound boards and a daugh- 
terboard, starting with the 
original Sound Blaster 
Deluxe ($115.95), an 8-bit 
monaural card with 1 1 voic- 
es. It sold so well that now 
everything has to be Sound 
Blaster compatible. The 
Sound Blaster Pro Deluxe 
($179.95) adds stereo and 
moves up to 20 voices, but 

JUNE 1994 COMPUTE 55 



COMPUTE'S GETTING STARTED WITH 



PC SOUND 



is still an 8-bit card without a 
CD-ROM interface. The 
Sound Blaster 16 Basic 
($199.95) moves to 16-bit, 
20-voice FM-synthesized 
stereo sound, with a propri- 
etary Creative Labs CD- 
ROM interface. 

The Sound Blaster 16 
MultiCD ($249.95) adds a CD- 
ROM interface for Sony, 
Panasonic, and Mitsumi drives. 
The Sound Blaster 16 SCSI-2 
($279.95) adds the more stan- 
dard SCSI-2 interface for CD- 
ROM drives. 

And the new top-of-the- 
line Sound Blaster AWE32 
($399.95) includes improved 
General MIDI, 512K of RAM 
for MIDI sampling, and 
advanced text-to-speech 
synthesis. 

You can upgrade any of 
the 16-bit boards to wave- 
table sound and General 
MIDI by adding a Wave 
Blaster daughterboard 
($249.95), which provides 
128 instruments, 18 drums, 
and 50 sound effects in 
4MB of on-board ROM, 
playing back in 32 voices. 
Also, many of the 16-bit 
boards have a socket for 
the Advanced Signal 
Processor DSP chip 
($69.95), which supplies 
hardware sound compres- 
sion and QSound, a 3-D 
surround-sound system. 

Sound Blaster boards 
come with an unusually rich 
set of bundled software. 
The three high-end boards 
include VoiceAssist, a 
Windows voice recognition 
program that lets you give 
voice commands to any 
Windows application. 

The Pro Audio family. 

(Media Vision, 800-845-5870) 
Industry sources indicate that 
Media Vision's 16-bit boards 
outsell the other sound 
boards by a wide margin. 
They're the only licensed, 
Sound Blaster-compatible 

56 COMPUTE JUNE 1994 




SoundMan 



If you like to play games on your PC, be sure to check the sound 
card's box for Sound Blaster compatibility. 



boards on the market. 

The standard board is the 
Pro AudioSpectrum 16 
($299), based on a 20-voice 
FM synthesizer. It includes an 
industry-standard SCSI CD- 
ROM interface. 

The low-end Pro Audio 16 
Basic ($199) leaves out the 
SCSI interface and some 
software to provide good, 
basic FM-synthesized sound. 

On the high end, the Pro 
AudioStudio 16 ($349) adds 
impressive voice recognition 
software, a professional wave- 
form editor, and MIDI software 
to the Pro AudioSpectrum's 
bundle, making it capable of 
serious sound mixing and 
editing. Sound cards featuring 
wave-table sound and DSPs 
have been announced, but 
aren't yet available from 
MediaVision. 



The Aztech Sound 
Galaxy family. (Aztech 
Labs, 510-623-8988) The 
Aztech Sound Galaxy Pro 
16 Extra ($279) is a 16-bit, 
20-voice card that comes 
with FM synthesis and a 
CD-ROM interface for 
Sony, Panasonic, and 
Mitsumi drives. Upgrades 
are available to add a SCSI 
interface and/or wave-table 
sound through a plug-in 
daughterboard. 

The Sound Galaxy Pro 
offers voice recognition and 
the Monologue for Windows 
text-to-speech program in 
its unusually comprehen- 
sive suite of software pro- 
grams. The package also 
includes a microphone and 
headphones. 

Aztech offers a full line of 
8-bit and 16-bit cards; the 



lower-end cards are also 
compatible with Disney 
Sound Source and COVOX 
Speech Thing. 

Standard 

Wave-Table Boards 
SoundMan Wave. (Logi- 
tech, 510-795-8500, $349) 
Logitech's wave- table 
board uses Yamaha's OPL4 
chip set to provide excellent 
General MIDI. This 16-bit 
sound board features hard- 
ware-based audio com- 
pression, a SCSI-based 
CD-ROM interface, an 
optional DSP chip upgrade 
(for various audio effects, 
such as surround sound, 
reverb, and chorus), a 
jumperless installation, and 
a built-in six-watt amplifier 
with both speaker and line- 
out connectors. 

The board also comes 
with a generous selection of 
bundled software that 
includes Animotion's MCS 
MusicRack (which features a 
digital recorder for recording 
and editing WAV files, an 
audio-CD player for CD- 
ROM drives, a MIDI file play- 
er, and an audio mixing con- 
sole), Midisoft's Recording 
Session (which combines 
MIDI sequencing and nota- 
tion), and Berkeley Speech 
Technologies' BeSTspeech 
ReadOut (which converts 
ordinary text to spoken 
words). 

You also get Moon 
Valley's Icon Hear-lt (which 
lets you add sound effects 
to your Windows icons) and 
Voyetra's SoundMan Anno- 
tator (which lets you anno- 
tate messages in any 
Windows OLE application). 

And if all that isn't 
enough to convince you, 
Logitech offers a 60-day 
money-back guarantee on 
its SoundMan Wave. If you 
don't like the card, return it 
to the place where you 
bought it for a full refund. 



COMPUTE'S GETTING STARTED WITH 



PC SOUND 



Advanced Gravis 

UltraSound. (Advanced 
Gravis Computer Technolo- 
gy, 800-663-8558, $199) The 
UltraSound board has gen- 
erated a lot of excitement by 
offering surprisingly good 
32-voice wave-table sound 
at an extremely low price. 
The manufacturers decided 
to reach for a new standard 
instead of competing with 
the expensive wave-table 
MIDI boards from compa- 
nies such as Roland and 
Turtle Beach. Although the 
UltraSound is a 16-bit board, 
Advanced Gravis made it 
16-bit for playback and 8-bit 
for recording, with 16-bit 
recording available as an 
option. Most users record 
voice, for which 8-bit record- 
ing is more than adequate. 
Advanced Gravis is aggres- 
sively pushing software 
developers to write for this 
card and take full advantage 
of its high-quality wave-table 
features. 

One interesting feature 
of the UltraSound is that its 
sound patch files are 
loaded onto your hard disk, 
then downloaded into 
DRAM on the board when 
you boot the computer. This 
way, they're changeable. 
This may not sound impor- 
tant to you, but it allows 
software developers to pro- 
vide their own sounds for 
special situations. Psyg- 
nosis's new game Hired 
Guns replaces 60 of the 
UltraSound sound patches 
with futuristic high-tech 
weapon sounds. And as 
future improvements to the 
patch files become avail- 
able, upgrading your sys- 
tem will be easy. (Creative 
Lab's new SoundBlaster 
AWE32 has a similiar ability 
to load sound patch files 
from your hard drive.) 

The UltraSound board 
comes with the interface for 
Sony, Panasonic, and 




Event*: 



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Directory: c:\sndsysVsounds 



File Information 
Picture: Label: 



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Microsoft Windows Sound System 2.0 includes a utility that tets 
you associate sounds with Windows events. 



Mitsumi drives, but the more 
expensive SCSI interface is 
available as an option. 

Orchid Soundwave 32. 

(Orchid Technology, 800-7- 
ORCHID, $299) Based on 
the Analog Devices DSP 
chip, the SoundWave 32 
provides 16-bit, 24-voice 
wave-table sound and a 
Sony CD-ROM interface. 
The SoundWave has the 
standard compatibilities 
and also offers both MIDI 
and Roland MT-32. It can 
use three of its modes 
simultaneously, so gamers 
can have Sound Blaster 
sound effects and the MIDI 
or Roland music the game 
provides. It comes with a 
microphone and speakers 
as well as several multime- 
dia-authoring software 
tools. 

ViVa Maestro 16 and 
16VR- (Computer Peri- 
pherals, 800-854-7600, 
$169 and $219, respective- 
ly) The Maestro 16 board 
use the Aria chip set to 
deliver 32-voice, 16-bit 



wave-table sound and 
includes its own SCSI CD- 
ROM interface — all for a 
very good price. The 
Maestro 16VR includes the 
Aria Listener chip, which 
provides hardware voice 
recognition. 

Reveal SoundFX WAVE 

32. (Reveal Computer 
Products, 800-669-3559, 
$299) Using the Ensoniq 
SoundScape chip set, the 
SoundFX WAVE 32 delivers 
32-voice, 16-bit wave-table 
sound from an unusually 
rich 317-instrument wave 
table. It comes with a Sony 
CD-ROM interface, a how-to 
video to ease installation 
fears, and a bundle of soft- 
ware that includes the 
entertaining SuperJAM! Jr. 
MIDI-based music-compo- 
sition program. 

MediaMagic DSP-1 6 
Plus. (MediaMagic, 800- 
624-8654, $259) Media- 
Magic, a division of Austin 
Computers, offers a full line 
of sound boards and multi- 
media upgrade kits. The 



DSP-16 Plus is a 16-bit 
wave-table board that offers 
MPEG compression — the 
only board with MPEG that 
we found in our research for 
this article. (MPEG com- 
pression is usually video 
related, requiring a special 
board. This sound board 
won't do video compres- 
sion, but it provides 
extremely effective audio 
file compression.) 

High-End 

Wave-Table Boards 
RAP-10. (Roland, 213- 
685-5141, $599) Roland 
has always been the Rolls- 
Royce of computer music. 
Its RAP-10 board converts 
your PC into a professional 
recording studio, providing 
both 16-bit, 26-voice wave- 
table sound and a sophisti- 
cated set of software tools 
in the Roland Audio 
Toolworks. It's fully compati- 
ble with all MIDI software 
and works with any games 
that provide full MIDI 
soundtracks. There's no 
Sound Blaster compatibility, 
however — this is a serious 
music tool, not a gamer's 
board. (But in concert with 
your old Sound Blaster, it's 
a dream come true.) It pro- 
vides both reverb and cho- 
rus processing to add a fin- 
ished studio quality to your 
music. This is state-of-the- 
art MIDI sound. 

Turtle Beach Maui. 

(Turtle Beach Systems, 800- 
645-5640, $199) Turtle 
Beach, supplier of the seri- 
ous MultiSound ($599) 
sound card for Windows, 
has created the inexpensive 
Maui board for us ordinary 
folks. It adds 24-voice, 16- 
bit wave-table sound to 
your existing Sound 
Blaster-compatible card. 
Use your old card for the 
voice and sound effects, 
but run the music through 

JUNE 1994 COMPUTE 57 



COMPUTE'S GETTING STARTED WITH 



PC SOUND 



the Maui board for the best 
of both worlds — for less 
money than Sound Blaster's 
wave-table upgrade. Of 
course, you'll need an extra 
slot to hold the board. The 
Maui board provides both 
General MIDI and the MPU- 
401 interface that most 
wave-table-enabled soft- 
ware supports. It also pro- 
vides a way to replace 
patches in its wave table 
with sounds you record on 
your existing sound board. 

Windows-Specific 

Board 

Microsoft Windows 

Sound System 2.0. 

(Microsoft, 206-882-8080, 
$219) The original Windows 
Sound System provided 
business audio only; it was 
strictly a Windows device. 
The new version 2.0 adds 
Sound Blaster compatibility 
for gaming die-hards, but 
also adds a robust set of 
software tools for voice 
recognition. A special direc- 
tional microphone helps 
focus the software on your 
voice commands. The 
Voice Pilot and voice anno- 
tation software are also 
available for $79 without the 
sound board. Text-to- 
speech software allows 
proofreading your docu- 
ments, as the computer 
reads the text to you from 
the screen. The Windows 
Sound System is still not the 
board for serious entertain- 
ment buffs, but its business 
audio tools are unmatched. 

Multifunction Board 
ACE Advanced Com- 
munications Enhance- 
ment Board. (Best Data 
Products, 818-773-9600, 
$259) Using IBM's Mwave 
DSP chip set, Best Data 
Products has created a 
sound board that's a lot 
more than other sound 
boards. Not only does it 

58 COMPUTE JUNE 1994 




Many of the SoundBlaster 16 sound cards use Creative Labs ' 
proprietary ASP chip to offer DSP functionality. 



provide 16-bit wave-table 
sound, but it also includes a 
14,400-bps modem, a 
14,400-bps fax with fax- 
back and fax-forward fea- 
tures, a telephone answer- 
ing machine and voice-mail 
system with ten mailboxes, 
and an interface for Sony, 
Panasonic, and Mitsumi 
CD-ROM drives. 

It does 3:1 data com- 
pression and soon will 
have fax-to-speech capa- 
bility to read your incoming 
faxes to you. It has on- 
board call discrimination to 
separate voice calls from 
modem or fax calls, routing 
them to the proper chan- 
nels. It can do any two of 
these functions at once, 
with the additional capabili- 
ty of being able to handle 
incoming phone calls even 
when you're already using 



two other functions. 

This is an exciting prod- 
uct; it shows what full use of 
DSP chips can do. Look for 
more multifunction boards 
in the near future. 

Conclusion 

PC sound is a vibrant, lively 
arena with new products 
and ideas being heralded 
almost daily. The develop- 
ments of the last year, 
bringing wave-table sound 
into the price range of ordi- 
nary mortals, were wel- 
come, as the next year's 
surprises will be. 

If you aren't participating 
in PC sound yet, now's the 
time to make your move. 
Study the current slate of 
available cards, buy one, 
and start enjoying a new 
dimension of computing. 

—Richard O. Mann 



WHAT YOU NEED TO 
KNOW ABOUT DSP 
CHIPS 

The coming of DSP (Digital 
Signal Processor) chips is 
revolutionizing sound 
boards, modems, and 
voice-processing hardware, 
DSPs are powerful comput- 
er chips specially designed 
to deal with electronic rep- 
resentations of sound at 
unheard-of speeds. They 
multitask, they operate at 
lightning speeds, and they 
understand sound. 

And they're priced so 
low that all but low-end 
sound boards are adopting 
them. Not only do DSPs 
provide high performance, 
but they can be repro- 
grammed through software- 
only upgrades. As new 
capabilities are developed, 
you add them to your sound 
card by running a program 
from a disk— no opening 
the computer case and pry- 
ing off old chips to replace 
them, or replacing whole 
sound boards. It's a dream 
come true. 

One board vendor spoke 
of having his basic sound 
board on the computer store 
shelf along with smaller 
boxes containing upgrades 
for advanced features such 
as QSound, reverb, sound 
alteration (which he called 
"psychoacoustic effects"), 
voice recognition, voice-to- 
text, video integration, tele- 
phony, and things we have 
yet to imagine. 

DSP cards are also easy 
to install. There are no 
jumpers to change; you 
change the settings through 
software. 

The Manufacturers 

The primary DSPs being 
used in consumer-level 
sound boards are from 
Sierra Semiconductors 
(called the Aria chip set), 



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COMPUTE'S GETTING STARTED WITH 



PC SOUND 



Analog Devices, IBM (the 
Mwave chip), and Creative 
Labs (the ASP chip). Boards 
equipped with these DSPs 
(and others) offer enough 
interfaces and emulations to 
satisfy most standard 
needs. 

When you get into more 
advanced functions, howev- 
er, developers have to write 
their software directly for the 
particular chip set involved, 
interplay's Star Trek game 
with voice recognition, for 
example, only works with 
the boards using the Aria 
Listener chip. Advanced 
audio functions have no 
standard interfaces yet, so 
be aware that at least for a 
while, the fancier DSP func- 
tions require software writ- 
ten specifically for your 
card. 

DSPs as Add-Ons 

Several sound board mak- 
ers sell basic sound cards 
without DSPs but offer DSP 
upgrades on daughter- 
boards or in other ways as 
add-ons. This can be an 
effective way to cycle into 
the DSP era. 

Simultaneous 
Operations 

While DSPs multitask, there 
are limitations as to what 
can happen simultaneously. 
Most boards are capable of 
two concurrent functions 
(such as wave-table music 
and FM-synthesis emulation 
for sound effects), but you'll 
need to make sure that any 
board you seriously consid- 
er can perform all the func- 
tions you want at the same 
time. 

The Future of the DSP 

DSPs offer a bright future 
for audio functions. There's 
a lot of talk in the industry 
about moving the DSPs 
onto the motherboard to 
allow tighter integration with 

60 COMPUTE JUNE 1994 




Wave for Windows 2.0 from Turtle Beach Systems turns your 
sound card-equipped PC into a digital audio recording studio. 



CPU functions. The future 
should hold additional 
audio wonders, including — 
we hope — more effective 
compression techniques to 
keep file sizes down. 

The next sound card I 
buy will be DSP based, 
without question. Perhaps 
yours should be, too. 

— Richard 0. Mann 

HOW TO MAKE THE 
BEST SOUND 
RECORDINGS 

With today's high-quality 
sound cards and sophisti- 
cated sound-editing pro- 
grams, you can record with 
near audio-CD quality. I use 
the phrase near audio-CD 
quality because, even 
though many of the sound 
cards' technical specifica- 
tions match those of home 
audio-CD players, there's 
often a small amount of 
interference from your other 
PC cards that can cause a 
barely audible amount of 
distortion. That said, most of 
us won't be mastering our 
own CDs for major record 
labels, so near CD quality is 
still close to a sonic miracle. 
To make the best sound 
recordings from your PC, 



you'll need 

• A high-quality 16-bit 
sound card 

• A hard drive with lots of 
free space 

• A relatively fast PC 
You may also need 

• A high-quality micro- 
phone 

• A full-featured sound- 
editing program 

• A decent defragmenta- 
tion program 

Top of the Charts 

Unfortunately, you can't 
always judge the recording 
quality of a sound card from 
its 'specification sheet. In 
theory, any sound card with 
16-bit sampling will have 
the same frequency re- 
sponse as a typical audio- 
CD player. In fact, the quali- 
ty of the sound can vary 
greatly. 

Your best bet is to try 
the cards for yourself and 
decide which card sounds 
best to your ears. Among 
the generally available 
sound cards, Turtle Beach 
Systems' MultiSound and 
Roland's RAP-10 offer 
perhaps the best-quality 
recording, though any 16- 
bit sound card should 
give you better recordings 



than any 8-bit card. 

When auditioning a 
sound card, you should lis- 
ten closely to the quality of 
its sound. Is the sound crys- 
tal-clear and is there 
absolute silence between 
musical phrases? Is the 
sound harsh or too skewed 
toward the high frequen- 
cies? Does the sound skip 
slightly when playing? 

For the best results, 
you'll need to record with 
16-bit sampling at 44.1 
kHz— which will give you 
theoretical CD quality. (A 
few sound cards will let you 
record at 48 kHz, the sam- 
ple rate used by profession- 
al DAT recorders, but that 
rate is even more demand- 
ing of your hardware.) 
When recording in stereo at 
44.1 kHz, each minute will 
take up roughly 10.5MB on 
your hard drive. Plan on set- 
ting aside a large portion of 
your hard drive for audio 
recording, or consider 
adding a separate hard 
drive that would be dedicat- 
ed to audio recordings. 

For most sound cards, 
you'll also need a 33-MHz 
486 or faster processor 
(boards that use a DSP chip 
to take some of the load off 
your main processor may 
require only a fast 386). Of 
course, you can record at a 
lower sampling rate, drop to 
8-bit sampling, or switch to 
mono recording, and you 
won't need as much hard 
drive space or as fast a 
processor — but you won't 
get the same-quality 
recordings. 

Unless you're recording 
strictly electronically, you'll 
need a good microphone. 
The ones that come with 
most sound cards are too 
cheap for high-quality 
recording. If you have 
Microsoft Windows Sound 
System 2.0, you'll need to 
buy a separate microphone 



COMPUTE'S GETTING STARTED WITH 1 



PC SOUND 



for recording— the one 
that's bundled with the 
package is optimized for 
speech recognition. 

While most sound cards 
include some kind of editing 
program for WAV-format 
sound files, you're better off 
stretching for a dedicated 
program such as The Turtle 
Tools for Multimedia (Turtle 
Beach Systems, 717-843- 
6916, $89), Wave for 
Windows 2.0 (Turtle Beach 
Systems, $149), or Sound 
Forge 2.0 (Sonic Foundry, 
608-256-3133, $179). With 
these programs, you'll be 
able to add professional- 
quality digital effects, such 
as echo, reverb, flange, 
reverse, volume, and pan. 

With MCS SoundTrak 
(Animotion Development, 
205-591-5715, $79.95), you 
can add a new dimension 
to your sound through the 
magic of QSound. It's a rev- 
olutionary technology that 
adds a three-dimensional 
quality to sounds; you can 
even place individual 
sounds in precise positions 
across a full 180 degrees. 

Because you'll be con- 
stantly writing large files to 
your hard drive, you'll also 
need a defragmentation 
program. When your com- 
puter is trying to smoothly 
store sound to your hard 
drive at 10.5MB a minute, 
you can get gaps in your 
sound recording if your 
hard drive is forced to write 
data to noncontiguous 
tracks. To defragment your 
hard drive, you can use 
DOS 6.2's Defrag program 
or one of the optimizer pro- 
grams that ships with such 
utility packages as The 
Norton Utilities and PC 
Tools. 

If you use Stacker or 
DOS's DoubleSpace com- 
pression, you may also slow 
down your hard drive, mak- 
ing it difficult to achieve a 



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SuperJAM! from The Blue Ribbon SoundWorks lets you choose a 
musical style and create professional-sounding MIDI songs. 



perfect recording. If you 
have problems due to com- 
pression, you might set 
aside a large portion of your 
drive to remain uncom- 
pressed or consider using a 
separate hard drive that 
isn't compressed. 

Going for the Gold 

If you're really serious about 
using your PC as an audio 
workstation, you should con- 
sider SAW (Innovative Quality 
Software, 702-733-7854, 
$599) or Yamaha's CBX-D5 
Digital Recording Processor 
(714-522-9011, $2,995). 

SAW (Software Audio 
Workshop) lets you play 
back four simultaneous CD- 
quality stereo tracks— that's 
a total of eight tracks. It 
also features automated 
nondestructive mixing with 
down-to-the-sample accu- 
racy (1/48,000 of a second 
when sampling at the 48- 
kHz sampling rate). SAW 
requires only a 386 with 
eight megabytes of memory 
and one of the seven sup- 
ported sound cards: a 
Creative Labs Sound 
Blaster 16 or 16ASP, Media 
Vision Pro AudioSpectrum 
16 or Pro AudioStudio 16, 



Turtle Beach Systems 
MultiSound, or Digital Audio 
Labs CardD or CardD+. For 
simultaneous recording and 
playback, you'll need to use 
either the MultiSound or 
CardD+, otherwise you'll 
have to record separately 
and edit in your recording. 
The company also sells 
SAW jr. ($249), which 
leaves out the multitrack 
features and MIDI/SMPTE 
synchronization. 

All in all, SAW is a remark- 
able program that truly push- 
es the envelope for profes- 
sional audio from a standard 
out-of-the-box PC. 

If your goal is the 
absolute best recording, 
you can use your PC as a 
front end to a dedicated 
recording system. That's 
the position that Yamaha 
takes with its CBX-D5, a 
separate four-track record- 
ing system that offers two- 
track simultaneous record- 
ing and four-track CD-quali- 
ty playback. (The CBX-D5 
has true four-track output, 
while SAW currently has 
only two-track output.) The 
CBX-D5 also provides on- 
board digital signal pro- 
cessing and equalization, 



with 82 different reverb and 
modulation effects. 

On the PC side, the unit 
ships with Steinberg 
Jones's Cubase Audio as 
its software. Because the 
unit has its own coproces- 
sor, it will work with virtually 
any Windows 3.1-compati- 
ble computer. For storage, 
it uses any standard SCSI 
hard drive with an access 
time of 30 milliseconds or 
less. The price may seem 
steep, but you can produce 
original recordings with the 
CBX-D5 that really do 
sound just as good as an 
audio CD. 

End of Reel 

Even though it seems com- 
plicated, making high-quali- 
ty recordings with your PC is 
actually pretty easy. Just 
give it a try and experiment 
with the different settings— 
with computer-based sound 
capture and editing, you 
can always back up and 
start all over again. 

— David English 

HOW TO SET UP A 
MIDI MUSIC STUDIO 

Surprise! You may already 
have everything or nearly 
everything you need to set 
up a MIDI music studio. 
Many of today's sound 
cards have a General MIDI 
module built in. Others let 
you add a General MIDI 
daughterboard or — at the 
very least— let you add an 
external General MIDI mod- 
ule to the built-in MIDI inter- 
face. 

Depending on how you 
add General MIDI, you may 
have to pay only $100-$500 
for what would have cost 
$1,500-$2,000 in a MIDI 
synthesizer just 10-15 years 
ago. 

If you're looking to pur- 
chase a sound card with 
General MIDI built in, there 

JUNE 1994 COMPUTE 61 



COMPUTE'S GETTING STARTED WITH 



PC SOUND 



are a variety of options. 
Some sound cards, such as 
Computer Peripherals' ViVa 
Maestro 16, use the Aria 
chip set to provide General 
MIDI. Synthesizer manufac- 
turer Ensoniq offers a chip 
set that's used in Reveal's 
SoundFX WAVE 32, 
Aztec h's Wave Power 
Sound Module, and Best 
Data Products' Soniq 16. 
Roland's RAP-10 uses the 
same chip set found in 
Roland's popular Sound 
Canvas. Logitech's Sound- 
M an Wave uses Yamaha's 
OPL4 chip set, as does 
Genoa's AudioBlitz Stereo 
16+ daughterboard. Media 
Vision will soon offer the 
Korg chip set in many of its 
sound cards. 

Alternately, you can 
upgrade many versions of 
the Sound Blaster 16 sound 
card by adding Creative 
Labs' General MIDI daugh- 
terboard, called the Wave 
Blaster. And for external 
General MIDI modules, you 
might choose from Roland's 
Sound Canvas line (includ- 
ing the new SC50 and 
SC88), as well as Yamaha's 
Hello! Music, TG100, and 
new TG300. 

With today's General MIDI 
chips, you can transform 
your PC's sound card into a 
variety of pianos, guitars, 
drums, violins, and other 
great-sounding acoustic and 
electronic musical instru- 
ments. Almost all the General 
MIDI chip sets use wave- 
table synthesis to re-create 
the musical instruments. The 
instruments are recorded — 
or sampled — and are stored 
in ROM, where they can be 
called up when needed. 

Unlike traditional synthe- 
sis, where the musical instru- 
ments are re-created from a 
set of numbers, wave-table- 
based General MIDI instru- 
ments sound very close to 
the real thing. And as a 

62 COMPUTE JUNE 1994 



/fjffHiiiiiinitmmm 

JRI ■■■■■■■■■■■■■ ^B 



Yamaha's new PSR 510 keyboard is General MIDI compatible, has 
61 full-size touch-sensitve keys, and costs just $689.95. 



bonus, many of today's top 
computer games include 
support for General MIDI, 
improving the music within 
these games by several 
orders of magnitude. 

Techno Hip-Hop 

So you've bought a General 
MIDI sound card or external 
General MIDI module— how 
about a musical keyboard? 
If you just want to play back 
MIDI music files or input 
notes using the mouse, you 
don't really need a key- 
board. However, if you want 
to use a keyboard to play 
music, any MIDI keyboard 
should work, including 
portable MIDI synthesizers 
from Yamaha and Casio. 

Yamaha (714-522-9011) 
recently introduced two inex- 
pensive, yet feature-packed, 
MIDI synthesizers: the PSR 
510 ($689.95) and the PSR 
410 ($579.95). Both are 
General MIDI compatible and 
include 61 full-size touch- 
sensitive keys, 128 AWM 
(Advanced Wave Memory) 
sounds, 28-note polyphony, 
and a new stereo bass-boost 
speaker system. 

The 510 has 102 rhythms 
and styles (the 410 has 80), a 
"sound sharper" dial (which 
the 410 doesn't have), and 
both realtime and step 
recording (the 410 has only 
realtime recording). Because 
both have a built-in speaker 
system, you can use either 
model as a stand-alone key- 
board or an add-on keyboard 



for your computer-based 
MIDI system. With both mod- 
ules, you get a lot for your 
money, and — best of all — 
they sound terrific. 

Because you can tap 
into General MIDI from your 
sound card or external 
General MIDI module, you 
can also use one of the 
inexpensive MIDI keyboard 
controllers that don't have a 
built-in synthesizer. These 
are available from Roland, 
Yamaha, and many other 
synthesizer companies. 
Roland's PC-200 ($250) 
and PC-200mkll ($345) key- 
board controllers are veloci- 
ty-sensitive 49-note key- 
boards that should work 
with any General MIDI 
sound card or module with 
a MIDI input connector. 

As for MIDI software, 
there are two main cate- 
gories of MIDI programs: 
sequencers and notation 
programs. Strictly speaking, 
sequencers offer powerful 
record, edit, and playback 
features and show the 
music onscreen as abstract 
patterns, while notation pro- 
grams have fewer sequenc- 
ing features but show the 
music in traditional music 
notation. 

In the real world, many 
sequencer programs in- 
clude a simple notation 
module (which is especially 
handy if you read music), 
and many notation pro- 
grams have powerful se- 
quencing features built in. 



Many sound cards include a 
simple sequencer program; 
some even include quite 
powerful ones. 

If your sound card doesn't 
include a sequencer or nota- 
tion program, you might take 
a look at Cakewalk Home 
Studio ($169.00) and 
Cakewalk Professional for 
Windows ($349.00) from 
Twelve Tone Systems (617- 
926-2480); Midisoft Sound 
Explorer CD-ROM ($19.95), 
MIDI Kit with Recording 
Session ($1 19.95), and 
Music Mentor with Recording 
Session ($149.95) from 
Midisoft (206-881-7176); and 
Trax ($149.00), MusicTime 
($149.00), MasterTracks Pro 
for Windows ($295.00), and 
Encore ($595.00) from 
Passport (415-726-0280). 

Three other MIDI pro- 
grams worth noting are 
EasyKeys ($39.95) from The 
Blue Ribbon SoundWorks 
(800-226-0212), which lets 
you simulate a musical key- 
board on your computer 
screen; MIDISCAN ($379.00) 
from Musitek (800-676- 
8055), which lets you use a 
300-dpi scanner to convert 
standard sheet music into 
computer-based MIDI files; 
and Musicware Piano 
($99.00) from Musicware 
(800-997-4266), a Windows- 
based program that includes 
an entire first-year piano 
course. 

And for a complete MIDI 
music package, take a look 
at The Gravis Personal 
Piano System from Ad- 
vanced Gravis (604-431- 
5020; $495). It includes an 
UltraSound sound card with 
General MIDI wave-table 
synthesis, a MIDI keyboard, 
the Musicware Piano soft- 
ware, a set of powered 
speakers, a MIDI adapter, 
and several Windows- 
based music composition 
applications. □ 

—David English 



COMPUTE'S GETTING STARTED WITH 1 



PC SOUND 



PC SOUND GLOSSARY 



ADC. Short for Analog to 
Digital Converter. A circuit 
that converts an analog 
audio signal into a digital 
audio signal. See also ana- 
log, digital, and DAC. 

analog. An audio signal 
whose fluctuating voltage 
pattern reflects the struc- 
ture of the original sound. 
See also digital. 

CD-DA. Short for Compact 
Disc-Digital Audio. Also 
known as Red Book audio. 
The CD-quality audio that 
comes directly from a con- 
ventional audio CD or CD- 
ROM. See also track. 

DAC. Short for Digital to 
Analog Converter. A circuit 
that converts a digital audio 
signal into an analog audio 
signal. See also ADC, 
analog, and digital. 

dB. Short for decibel. The 
standard unit of measure- 
ment used to describe a 
sound's amplitude or loud- 
ness. An amplitude increase 
of 1 dB results in a sound 
that's ten times louder. 

digital. An audio signal 
that has been converted 
into numbers that no longer 
directly reflect the structure 
of the original sound. See 
also analog. 

DSP. Short for Digital 
Signal Processor. An inte- 
grated circuit designed for 
high-speed data manipula- 
tion. Many sound cards use 
a DSP to provide reverb, 3- 
D, voice recognition, and 
other special audio effects. 

dynamic range. The dif- 
ference between the loudest 
and softest sounds for a par- 



ticular product or situation. 

General MIDI. An exten- 
sion of MIDI that establish- 
es a set of 128 instrument 
sounds that are grouped in 
a standard order. See also 
MIDI. 

Hz. Short for Hertz, Also 
known as cycles per sec- 
ond. A unit used to mea- 
sure the frequency of a 
vibrating object, such as a 
violin string or the cone in a 
speaker. The human ear 
can hear from approxi- 
mately 20 Hz to 20 kHz (20 
to 20,000 Hz). 

kHz, Short for kilohertz. 
Unit of frequency measure- 
ment that denotes 1000 
waves, or cycles, per sec- 
ond. See also Hz. 

MIDI. Short for Musical 
Instrument Digital Interface. 
Pronounced "middy." A dig- 
ital communications proto- 
col that allows electronic 
musical instruments and 
computers to communicate 
with each other. Because 
MIDI sends performance 
information (such as note 
on, note off, pitch change, 
and volume) rather than 
actual musical sounds, it's a 
highly efficient way to store 
and transmit musical data. 

MIDI connector. A five- 
pin DIN plug used to con- 
nect MIDI devices. 

MIDI file. A file format for 
storing MIDI songs. MIDI 
files generally have the 
extension MID on the PC. 

MIDI interface. A serial 
hardware device that 
allows a computer to send 
and receive MIDI data. 



MIDI Mapper. A Windows 
Control Panel applet that 
lets you specify which MIDI 
device will be associated 
with each of MIDI'S 16 
channels, which sound will 
be associated with each of 
Windows' 128 MIDI instru- 
ments, and which MIDI note 
will be associated with each 
MIDI drum sound. 

MIDI software. A com- 
puter program that can 
record, play, or manipulate 
MIDI data. 

MPC. Short for Multimedia 
PC Any computer, upgrade 
product, or software title that 
conforms to the standards 
set by the Multimedia PC 
Marketing Council. 

multitrack. A device or 
software program that 
offers more than two tracks 
for information storage. 
See also track. 

Red Book audio. See 
CD-DA. 

sample. To record digital- 
ly using an ADC. See also 
ADC. 

sampling rate. The fre- 
quency with which an ADC 
scans an incoming electri- 
cal signal. Higher sampling 
rates provide higher-quality 
recordings but require 
more storage capacity. 
Professional DAT (Digital 
Audio Tape) recorders use 
a sampling rate of 48 kHz, 
audio CDs use a sampling 
rate of 44.1 kHz, consumer 
DAT recorders use a sam- 
pling rate of 32 kHz, and 
many broadcasters and 
multimedia developers use 
a sampling rate of 22.05 
kHz. See also ADC, kHz, 



and sample. 

sound card. Also known 
as sound board. An expan- 
sion board you place 
inside a PC that improves 
the quality of the PC's 
sound output. A program 
must support the sound 
board before it can benefit 
from the board's improved 
sound quality. 

synthesizer An electronic 
musical instrument that can 
generate simple or complex 
sounds. Most synthesizers 
include a MIDI interface and 
a keyboard, though synthe- 
sizers without a built-in key- 
board (called sound mod- 
ules or expanders) are 
becoming increasingly more 
common. 

tempo. The speed that a 
MIDI file plays in MIDI soft- 
ware. Tempo is generally 
measured in beats per 
minute (BPM). 

track. A song or 
sequence of sound on a 
CD-DA disc. When refer- 
ring to a MIDI file, a track 
can be an individual MIDI 
channel or a separate part 
of a MIDI song. See also 
multitrack. 

WAVE file. The standard 
Windows file format for 
storing waveform audio. 
WAVE files generally have 
a WAV extension. 

waveform audio. A 

technique for re-creating 
voice and sound effects 
using digital audio sam- 
ples. Under Windows, 
waveform audio is general- 
ly stored with the WAV file- 
name extension. 

— David English 



JUNE 1994 COMPUTE 63 




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MULTIMEDIA GOES 

FAST FORWARD 

HOLLYWOOD 



BY DAVID ENGLISH 



If I had a crystal ball, I could see what software 
would look like in five or ten years. Since I couldn't 
use a crystal ball, I did the next best thing — I 
attended the first annual Digital Hollywood confer- 
ence in Beverly Hills, California. 

After four days of tutorials, panel discussions, and 
exhibits, I came away with the clear impression that 
computer software is about to go Hollywood in a big 
way. I also learned that the information highway has the 
potential to completely change software as we know it. 

The Hollywood invasion has already started. The first 
session of the conference was sponsored by the 
Writer's Guild, which announced it would 
accept members who write exclusively for 
interactive media. Another session 
featured Hollywood agents, who 
pitched their Hollywood talent 
(writers, directors, actors, pro- 
ducers, and executives) and 
argued that they should also 
represent the current play 
ers in the growing interac- 
tive industry. Companies 
such as Softimage, Alias, 
and Caiigari claimed that 
software developers 
could save money by 
employing the same 
computer-animation tech- 
nologies used in Jurassic 
Park, Terminator 2, and 
many recent television 
commercials. 

This warm reception from 
the Hollywood crowd reflects 
the new maturity of CD-ROM as a 
creative medium. Actors such as 
Margot Kidder, Donald Sutherland 
and Howie Mandel are appearing in multi- 
media titles (Under a Killing Moon, Conspiracy 
and Tuneland, respectively). Software developers are 
hiring Hollywood screenwriters and routinely spending 
$1-$2 million on their major titles. One panelist at the con- 
ference revealed that an upcoming project is being pro- 
duced as both a film and a CD-ROM, with the usual four- 
month shooting schedule extended to five months to allow 
extra material for the interactive version. 

The recording industry is also moving to CD-ROM. 
David Bowie's Jump lets you create a rock video using 
five different edit channels. Freak Show, from The 
Residents, is an eerie journey through a darkly lit carnival 
produced with state-of-the-art rendered graphics. And 
Peter Gabriel's Xplora 1 includes a wealth of background 




material about his album, Us, and features one of the 
best-looking interfaces around. 

With conference participants evenly divided between 
Silicon Valley and Hollywood, a number of questions came 
up related to how each side will influence the other. How will 
ever-increasing budgets change the nature of multimedia 
titles? What kind of material is best suited for linear media 
(such as books, movies, and television), and what kind of 
material is best suited for interactive media (such as CD- 
ROM)? After working all day in the office at the computer, 
do we really want to be interactive with our TV, or would we 
rather just zone out with a good movie? Do people even 
have the extra time and money to give broad sup- 
port to interactive media? 

Finally, there was a lot of discussion 
about the 500-channel information high- 
way. It appears we're moving beyond 
a multichannel system to a single 
channel that you program your- 
self. Already, several video-on- 
demand systems are being 
test-marketed throughout 
the country; these will pro- 
vide movies, information, 
and games whenever a 
viewer requests them. 
Oracle has announced an 
alliance with 20 companies, 
including Apple Computer 
and Sega, that will use 
Oracle's Media Server soft- 
ware to act as a video jukebox 
on a phone or cable system. If 
these systems are successful, 
televisions and computers could 
become indistinguishable. 
This new video-on-demand tech- 
nology has the potential to radically 
change the computer industry, letting a 
user call up a software program from the net- 
work whenever the program is needed. You might 
pay for the software in message units or as a pay-per- 
view. You might even own the rights to use a program 
wherever you are — a sort of virtual ownership — so when 
you travel, you would always have access to the program. 
While it was clear from the conference that high-qual- 
ity software can be delivered over a fiber-optic network, 
no one knows whether people will actually want to 
receive their software this way. On the other hand, if 
each home is willing to spend just $20 a month for this 
new form of interactive media, we could see a new $20 
billion industry. With that kind of money, it's easy to get 
Hollywood's attention. □ 




MULTIMEDIA PC 



By Scott A. May 



Some things were just 
meant to be — like the 
newfound alliance of sci- 
ence-fiction games with 
CD-ROM. By all accounts, 
it's a match made in heaven. 
For perhaps the first time in 
the history of computer 
entertainment, the untapped 
potential of the medium — in 
terms of computing power, 
storage capacity, and digital 
technology — now chal- 
lenges the imagination of 
science-fiction authors. 
What will life be like 100 



200, or even 1000 years into 
the future? If you believe sci- 
ence-fiction game designers, 
our descendants will face 
some rather bleak times. 
Almost without exception, 
the science-fiction titles 
explored here are set in dark 
and threatening visions of 
the future. Typical story lines 
are driven by galactic war, 
universal oppression, tech- 
nology gone awry, and vari- 
ous other cata- 
c I y s m i c 
events. 
Likewise, 
your usual 
course of 
action 




involves the prevention of 
such terrible events, through 
time travel, space combat, or 
matching wits with an evil 
computer. While it's true that 
without conflict, there 
wouldn't be much story or 
action, such horrific scenarios 
tend to stereotype science 
fiction as a pessimistic genre. 
On the other hand, what's 
past is prologue, meaning 
that whatever has already 
occurred could easily hap- 
pen again. In the accelerat- 
ed world of the future, yes- 
terday's Hitler becomes 
tomorrow's deranged super- 
computer. Atomic bombs 
that once destroyed cities 
might be antimatter devices 
capable of wiping out entire 
solar systems. Instead of 
countries defending their tiny 
shores against hostile ene- 
mies, planets could be 
forced to repel strange 
from another 
. So it appears 
that the 
game — an 
age-old 
struggle 
for peace 
and survival — 
remains the same; 
only the players and 
rules are more fantastic. 

Come Out Blasting 

Perhaps it's just the nature of 
the beast, but many science- 
fiction CD-ROM titles seem 
to assume that a complex 
story line and steep learning 
curve automatically denote a 
serious, intellectual game. 



Others just want to have fun, 
forgoing heavy ambiance for 
rip-roaring futuristic action. 
Call them shallow or science 
fiction lite, but these titles 
offer instant gratification for 
players who'd rather skip the 
hyperbole and get right to 
the high-tech toys. 

One of the first CD- 
ROM-only titles to explore 
the arcade side of the sci- 
ence-fiction genre is Rebel 
Assault (LucasArts, 800- 
969-GAME, $79.95), a multi- 
scenario shoot-' em-up 
based on George Lucas's 
famed Star Wars trilogy. 
Using actual Star Wars 
footage, a cast of full-voiced 
characters, and John 
Williams's original film score, 
the game creates one of the 
first truly successful interac- 
tive movies. You assume the 
role of Rookie One, a hot- 
shot pilot fashioned after the 
film's hero, Luke Skywalker. 
Prove your mettle through 15 
levels of increasing chal- 
lenge, including hair-raising 
training flights through 
Beggar's Canyon, first-per- 
son space combat against 
TIE fighters, asteroid fields, 
bombing runs, Walkers, Star 
Destroyers, and the final 
Death Star trench run. Other 
sequences feature face-to- 
face laser duels with 
Emperial Stormtroopers. The 
product's greatest weakness 
is an unfortunate lack of 
depth. Both the story line 
and the action sequences 
are preprogrammed, with lit- 
tle or no variation in the 



SCIENCE-FICl 



order or outcome. Regard- 
less, Star Wars fans — as well 
as students of cutting-edge 
programming techniques — 
will find the simulated 
arcade action well worth the 
price of admission. 



and Space Ace, the movie 
pauses for you to take spe- 
cific actions at precise 
moments. Failure to do so 
ends one life and simply 
rewinds the film for you to try 
again. The story flow is strict- 




Travel through time with The Journeyman Project. 



Another promising exam- 
ple of a next-generation 
interactive movie is Critical 
Path (Media Vision, 800-684- 
6699, $64.95). This CD-ROM 
combines full-motion video 
with realtime action and 
superb sound effects. The 
setting is a postapocalyptic 
world where a young heli- 
copter pilot named Kat 
(Eileen Weisinger) crash- 
lands on the island fortress 
of a mad general. Kat takes 
refuge in an abandoned fac- 
tory, where you must lead 
her through 15 dangerous 
levels to freedom. Along the 
way she faces hordes of 
mutants, armed guards, and 
deadly booby traps. Like the 
previous title, this one looks 
and plays great, but it suf- 
fers from a threadbare story 
line. Like a live-action ver- 
sion of early interactive car- 
toons, such as Dragon's Lair 



ly linear, with few alternate 
branches to follow; thus, the 
game has limited replay 
value. The designers offset 
this slightly with some entic- 
ing variations on your inter- 
action with Kat, who displays 
realistic character reac- 
tions — relief, frustration, and 
anger — based on the quality 
of your play. Technically bril- 
liant but structurally flawed, 
Critical Path showcases both 
the strong points and the 
rough edges of this promis- 
ing new genre. 

Released initially on disk 
to widespread critical 
acclaim, Strike Commander 
CD Edition (Origin, 800-245- 
4525, $69.95) makes a great 
game even better. In this 
game set in the near future, 
you command a squadron of 
elite mercenary pilots, flying 
the F-16 Fighting Falcon and 
F-22 Lightning against a vari- 





ety of foes. Based on 
RealSpace technology pio- 
neered in Chris Roberts's 
Wing Commander series, the 
game incorporates the 
dynamics of a top-end flight 
simulation with breathtaking 
graphics, a branching story 
line, and intriguing dialogue. 
In addition to the game's 41 
original missions, the 
enhanced CD-ROM version 
contains 24 more missions 
from the Tactical Operations 
supplement, as well as talk- 
ing characters and digitized 
sound effects from the 
Speech Pack accessory. 
Other amendments include 
tweaked artificial intelligence 
for more challenging air- 
borne enemies, nearly dou- 
bled animation frame rates, 
built-in data caching, new 
rudder pedal and dual joy- 
stick controls, and an option- 
al realistic flight model for 
simulation purists. If you've 
got the system specs (a 50- 
MHz 486, 8MB RAM, and a 
double-speed CD-ROM 
drive are all recommended), 
this groundbreaking game is 
a feast for the senses. 

One of the finest science- 
fiction action games created 
specifically for CD-ROM is 
Iron Helix (Spectrum 
HoloByte, 800-695-4263, 



$99.95). The story concerns 
an intergalactic starship on 
cold war maneuvers and a 
malfunctioning computer 
that changes its primary tar- 
get to a heavily populated 
earthlike planet. Using only 
your wits and an unarmed 
remote-control biological 
research probe, you must 
search six levels of this 
ghostly dreadnought for 
clues to its destruction. 
Time's running out, and to 
make matters worse, the 
ship's deadly security robot 
is hot on your trail. The 
game's many outstanding 
features include more than 
an hour of atmospheric full- 
motion video clips, three 
uniquely different play lev- 
els, a wonderfully intuitive 
interface, and some of the 
smoothest step- based 
movement you'll find in a 
CD-ROM product. Marred 
only by its painfully deriva- 
tive story line, Iron Helix is 
an otherwise excellent sci- 
ence-fiction adventure 
bound for classic status. 

Sometimes, good inten- 
tions are undermined by less 
than perfect execution, as in 
the case of CyberRace 
(Cyberdreams, 818-348- 
3711, $69.95). The setting is 
a far-off future, where inter- 




Explore a futuristic city with Noctropolis. 




MULTIMEDIA PC 



planetary war has been 
replaced by high-speed hov- 
ercraft racing across treach- 
erous terra firma. You play 
Clay Shaw, a disgruntled 
pilot blackmailed into com- 
petition by your corrupt gov- 
ernment, which holds your 
girlfriend as collateral for 
your allegiance. The concept 
is enticing but a little over- 
worked, marred by wooden 
full-voiced characters and 
repetitive gameplay. This 
DOS-based CD-ROM makes 
unreasonable system 
demands and is prone to 
crashing, if it loads at all. The 
game's high points — realistic 
Voxel-based landscapes 
and ray-traced vehicle 
graphics — are lost in the 
mire of technical difficulties. 



For science-fiction action 
with a touch of Old World 
mysticism, enter the surreal 
world of Inca (Sierra, 800- 
326-6654, $49.95), a 
delightfully original title from 
French developer Coktel 
Vision. This full-voiced, 
DOS-based CD-ROM game 
blends elements of arcade 
action, puzzle solving, and 
adventure gaming, aug- 
mented with digitized video 
and more than 40 minutes 
of audio-CD music. With no 
variation in the game's 
direction or puzzles, howev- 
er, there's little or no replay 
value once the game is 
solved. Otherwise, Inca's 
diversity of design and pol- 
ished presentation make it 
a must-see. 



Life in the Future Tense 

A hallmark of good science 
fiction is the ability to make 
the inconceivable totally 
believable. Doing so 
requires much more back- 
ground detail and slowly 
developing plot lines than 
most action-oriented games 
can afford. One of the top 
new titles in the science-fic- 
tion adventure genre is The 
C.H.A.O.S. Continuum 
(Creative Multimedia, 503- 
241-4351, $79.95). Set in 
the year 2577, the story 
unfolds in the domed city of 
New Eden, capital of 
Saturn's Titan Colony. When 
an orbiting neural net- 
based supercomputer goes 
ballistic, it sends the entire 
population into a mass 



catatonic state. It's feared 
that C.H.A.O.S. will soon 
spread to alternate dimen- 
sions, and you've been 
summoned to stop this 
threat of universal domina- 
tion. This Windows-based 
CD-ROM features an excel- 
lent interface and extrava- 
gant artwork rendered by 
the same software used to 
model visual effects in the 
films Aliens, Terminator 2, 
and Jurassic Park. A double- 
speed drive is highly recom- 
mended to enliven the 
game's otherwise slow step- 
based movement. 

Another adventure cast 
from a similar mold is The 
Journeyman Project (Quadra 
Interactive, 619-431-9530, 
$79.95). Here, you play a 



Science CD-ROMs: 
Beyond Fiction 

Whether you call it science 
fiction, speculative fiction, 
or future fantasy, this imagi- 
native genre grows from 
the seeds of science fact. 
The advent of multimedia 
CD-ROM has opened new 
doors for interactive sci- 
ence, as both educational 
tool and reference guide. 

Leading the pack is 
Warner New Media (818- 
955-9999) with two out- 
standing titles: The View 
from Earth ($79.98) and 
Murmurs of Earth ($59.99). 
The first product, available 
for Windows, takes you on a 
four-part tour of the earth, 
moon, sun, and ecliptic 
cycles. Presented in docu- 
mentary style and featuring 
more than 600 photos and 
illustrations, this fully narrat- 
ed slide show offers multiple 
levels of in-depth analysis 
covering dozens of related 
topics. Created in associa- 



tion with Time-Life Books, 
this astonishing CD-ROM is 
best suited for intermediate 
and advanced viewers. 
Science buffs and NASA 
collectors will find serious 
fun in Murmurs of Earth, a 
two-disc collection of all 118 
images and 90 minutes of 
CD audio included in the 
Voyager Interstellar Record. 
For those too young to 
remember, the twin Voyager 
probes were launched into 
the great unknown in 1977. 
On board were identical 
gold-plated records carrying 
pictures, symbols, music, 
and greetings from the 
inhabitants of earth. A fasci- 
nating multimedia curio, this 
DOS-based program is best 
when combined with Carl 
Sagan's 1978 book of the 
same name. 

Take a self-guided histori- 
cal tour of the U.S. aero- 
space industry with Ameri- 
cans in Space (Multicom 
Publishing, 800-245-4525, 



$59.95). Navigation is a 
breeze with the intuitive mis- 
sion control interface. Select 
from a menu of seven main 




The View from Earth 

NASA projects: Mercury, 
Gemini, Apollo, Skylab, 
Apollo-Soyuz, Space Shuttle, 
and Space Station. Dozens 
of subtopics in each catego- 
ry feature more than 500 dra- 
matic pictures and over an 
hour of full-motion video. For 
a more hands-on experi- 
ence, climb aboard Space 
Shuttle (Software Toolworks, 
800-234-3088, $49.95) and 
take an active role in NASA's 
shuttle program, from train- 
ing to spacewalking. This 



exceptional product, avail- 
able for both DOS and 
Windows, simulates 53 
authentic missions and 
includes a multimedia history 
of the shuttle program. 

If scientific curiosity 
draws you to the mysterious 
and unusual, set your sights 
on UFO (Software Marketing, 
602-893-3377, $59.95), a 
serious guide to extraterres- 
trial phenomena. This 
Windows-based CD-ROM is 
actually a comprehensive 
database of more than 1 200 
sightings, boasting the 
world's largest collection of 
UFO photographs. There are 
even digitized film clips of 
UFO sightings, although the 
grainy texture of multimedia 
video makes their worth 
questionable at best. Set the 
database search parameters 
to pinpoint sightings by a 
range of years, or use more 
eclectic criteria, such as cat- 
tle mutilation, abduction, and 
multiple witnesses. 



68 COMPUTE JUNE 1994 



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weary agent of the Temporal 
Protectorate, whose job is to 
monitor the space-time con- 
tinuum against terrorist sabo- 
tage. If a rift occurs, you 
must travel back in time to 
mend the damage and its 
effects on the future. The 
game's best feature is its 
heightened sense of future 
ambiance, thanks to imagi- 
native graphics and sensa- 
tional sound effects. 
Unfortunately, it's also frus- 
tratingly slow, even on an 
optimized system, testing the 
patience of the most dedi- 
cated science-fiction gamer. 

Fear of global ecological 
ruin drives the plot of many 
science-fiction adventures, 
including Quantum Gate 
(Media Vision, $64.95), a 
unique two-hour excursion 
into what designer Greg 
Roach calls virtual cinema. 
You play Drew Griffith, space 
med student stationed on a 
distant mining planet, where 
the harvest of a rare mineral 
holds the key to earth's sur- 
vival. Discover true friends 
and deadly foes at the base 
camp, while battling giant 
insects on the planet's sur- 
face. Far more abstract than 
most CD-ROM titles, this one 
works better as a limited 
example of interactive art 
than a viable source of pro- 
longed entertainment. The 
game's best features are the 
haunting CD-quality sound- 
track and an abundance of 
full-motion video. Decidedly 
unusual, but not for all tastes. 

Far more accessible is 
Star Trek 25th Anniversary 
Enhanced CD-ROM (Inter- 
play, 714-553-6655, street 
price of approximately 
$79.95). Boldly go where no 
computer game has gone 
before with this fully talking 
version, featuring the unmis- 
takable voices of the original 

70 COMPUTE JUNE 1994 



Star Trek crew, led by 
William Shatner (Kirk), 
Leonard Nimoy (Spock), and 
DeForest Kelley (McCoy). 
Nearly two dozen other 
actors join the fun, bringing 
the world's most popular sci- 
ence-fiction characters to 
life. Multiple scenarios, each 
with many possible resolu- 
tions, deliver a long-lasting 
challenge. This DOS-based 
CD-ROM's only drawbacks 
are the often-garish low-res- 
olution graphics, as well as 
the inevitable battle for suffi- 



direction in the development 
of computer entertainment. 

Leading the pack is Under 
a Killing Moon (Access 
Software, 800-800-4880, 
price not available), the 
sequel to Martian Memoran- 
dum, which places you inside 
a live-action, Super VGA vir- 
tual world. Features of this 
three-disc set include totally 
unrestricted movement, pho- 
torealistic backdrops, and full 
interaction with characters 
played by actors such as 
Margot Kidder, Brian Keith, 




Colonize distant worlds with Outpost. 



cient conventional memory. 
Another voice-enhanced 
CD-ROM version of an exist- 
ing title is Space Quest IV 
(Sierra, $39.95), a wacky sci- 
ence-fiction parody starring 
the galaxy's most unlikely 
sanitation hero, Roger Wilco. 
Playable from either DOS or 
Windows, the game features 
175MB of point-and-click 
lunacy, where consistency of 
plot is far less important than 
the number of belly laughs. 

Riding the Next Wave 

What lies ahead for science- 
fiction CD-ROM games? 
Break out your shades, 
because the future's looking 
incredibly bright! The next 
wave of science-fiction titles 
represents not just a bold 
new step for original CD- 
ROM games but a whole new 



and Russell Means. Another 
Hollywood connection in the 
works is The Dig (LucasArts, 
price not available), an inter- 
active space adventure 
codesigned by director 
Steven Spielberg. The game 
was originally slated for 
release on floppy disk, but 
the sheer size and scope of 
the project inevitably pushed 
it to CD-ROM. Look for this 
intriguing title next Christmas. 
Coming soon from Electronic 
Arts is Noctropolis (800-245- 
4525, price not available), a 
science-fiction adventure with 
a surreal fantasy flair. You 
play the manager of a comic 
book shop, swept into a bat- 
tle between good and evil 
that threatens to spill out into 
the real world. The game fea- 
tures fully digitized speech, 
hand-painted fantasy artwork, 



and more than an hour of full- 
motion character interaction. 

Paramount Interactive 
(415-812-8200), a relative 
newcomer to computer 
games, is looking to make a 
big splash with four exciting 
science-fiction CD-ROM 
titles. Jump Raven ($69.95) 
takes you to a future urban 
nightmare in a race to pre- 
vent worldwide "ecocide." 
Lunicus ($69.95) enlists your 
arcade skills for more earth- 
saving heroics in multiple 3- 
D environments. And Star 
Trek fans, start your drooling: 
Coming soon from Para- 
mount are two titles guaran- 
teed to send you into orbit. 
The Star Trek Interactive 
Technical Manual ($59.95) 
lets you wander freely 
aboard the Enterprise D, 
home to "The Next Gener- 
ation" crew. Fully interactive 
displays and props, cap- 
tured in stunning photoreal- 
ism, await your inspection. 
Sensors are also tracking 
Star Trek, Deep Space Nine: 
The Hunt ($69.95), sched- 
uled for release this fall. The 
adventure promises unparal- 
leled character interaction, 
an open-ended story struc- 
ture, and numerous cinemat- 
ic special effects. 

Already labeled "SimCity 
in space," Outpost (Sierra, 
$69.95) is another upcoming 
CD-ROM title that blends 
elements of traditional 
resource management with 
space exploration. Dressed 
in lavish 3-D ray-traced 
graphics, the game simu- 
lates interstellar colonization, 
a formidable project trig- 
gered by the earth's 
impending destruction by a 
giant meteor. Designer 
Bruce Balfour's experience 
as systems manager for 
NASA lends the game its 
awesome authenticity. □ 



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Wiggins' Ubfory is full of 
si uprises. 



Your child begins towiite a 
sum) by dwosing q setting, 
diameters, and props. 



It's as magical as any fairytale. A 
world where children can create their 
own animated storybooks, complete with 
illustrations, music, props and a cast of colorful 
characters: from dinosaurs to space aliens, 
princesses to cowboys. 

The secret's in the apple tree, where Wiggins, 
the friendly bookworm, has a room full of tools 
for storybook-making. Children can let their 

imaginations run wild as they invent 

&^SJ CrX ^ characters, weave intricate plots, 






Choose from dghtfim story 
tiiemes. 



Hecord your voice u> narrate 
your story. 



create magic effects— and choose 
from over 40 different songs to 
orchestrate their talcs. And they can experience 
the thrill of creating actual storybooks that can be 
printed out and colored in later. 

who knows? Maybe one night soon, your child 
will be reading you a story. 

For your copy of Media Vision's 
CD-ROM Wiggins in Storyland, 
Simply visit your local software MediaVision 

dealer Or Call US at: 1-800-845-5870. Now, that's multimedia 




riK/O tor inlormaiion or a dealer near you. Media Vision, the Media Vision logo and Wiggins in Storyland are trademarks of Media Vision Technology. Inc. Music Pen and the 
Musio Pen logo are irader narks of Music Pen. All oiher iracier narks arc ihose of their rcsixx.'live companies.^ ifKW Music l Vn. Inc. All Rights Reserved. 

Circle Reader Service Number 200 




NEW MULTIMEDIA PRODUCTS 



EDITED BY POLLY CILLPAM 



It's a Wonder 

Now you can combine full- 
motion video and high-per- 
formance graphics in a sin- 
gle card. 

The VIDEO WONDER 
captures and compresses 
full-motion video in realtime 
in a single step. It also dis- 



The card is available in ver- 
sions for the ISA bus, PCI 
local bus, and VESA local 
bus. 

ATI Technologies 

(416)882-2600 

$999 

Circle Reader Service Number 530 




The VIDEO WONDER combines video and graphics. 



plays live video in a window 
in full motion (30 frames per 
second) at any graphics res- 
olution. 

The VIDEO WONDER is 
easy to install and use. 
There are no cables to con- 
nect, since the graphics are 
built in. This saves a PC slot 
and ensures maximum per- 
formance, compatibility, and 
ease of use, since all the 
components are designed to 
work together and have a 
common user interface. The 
product offers high-quality 
video playback, allowing 
video images to be played 
back in full motion without 
being limited to the original 
captured image size. It also 
has comprehensive software 
utilities supporting video 
capture, compression, edit- 
ing, video-quality adjust- 
ment, and special effects. 

72 COMPUTE JUNE 1994 



Information Hat Trick 

Are you job-hunting? Do you 
want more information about 
your PC? Do you have an 
interest in photos or graph- 
ics? Allegro New Media has 
three new reference titles 
that should appeal to a 
broad range of users. 

Business 500 provides 
comprehensive and up-to- 
date information on over 500 
major U.S. companies— both 
public and private. Easily 
search through the database 
and extract the information 
you need- 
Access stock and finan- 
cial information, as well as 
executive names, address- 
es, and phone numbers, 
and learn about the prod- 
ucts and services of these 
companies with over 30 min- 
utes of interactive multime- 
dia videos. You'll find 



detailed company descrip- 
tions and histories, ten 
years' worth of employment 
data, and lists of brands and 
competitors. 

InPrint Art Library Volume 
2 is a two-disc set that's 
subtitled Graphic Photos 
and Scenic Photos. It's a 
stock photo library and per- 
sonal graphics tutor featur- 
ing over 200 high-resolution 
graphics that work with pop- 
ular programs. The photos 
are royalty-free. 

PC Library is an interac- 
tive computer encyclope- 
dia. It includes the full 
text— as well as thousands 
of pictures, tables, and 
charts— from over 30 best- 
selling computer reference 
books, tutorials, and manu- 
als. It also contains over 70 
interactive multimedia 
videos, ranging from config- 
uring a desktop to building 
a complete PC. The manu- 
als cover hardware, data- 
bases, help, word process- 
ing, spreadsheets, operat- 
ing systems, and productiv- 
ity. The reference books 
include networks, as well as 
home computing. 



The Multimedia Reference 
To America's Top Companies 




^\ MULTIMEDIA 

Business 

soo 



Business 500 

Allegro New Media 

(800)424-1991 

Business 500— $49.95 

InPrint Art Library Volume 

2— $59.95 

PC Library— $99.95 

Circle Reader Service Number 531 

Barnyard Language 

Teach your children a second 
language through a series of 
home learning products by 
Sanctuary Woods. The I- 
Learn Library for children 
ages 7-10 teaches reading, 
vocabulary, and creative 
writing skills in English, 
French, and Spanish. 




@ 



i ' pi :l ! .: up the telep i 
i called my friend the fi jt home- 



Learn French and Spanish with Sitting on the Farm. 



BRINGS YOUR 
VIDEOS TO LIFE 



STUDIO MAGIC - THE PERSONAL 
VIDEO STUDIO FOR WINDOWS® 




STUDIO MAGIC 

is literally a videotape 
production studio in a 
box. It lets you connect 
two video sources as 
input, then mix com- 
puter graphics, sound 
and animation for final 
output to your video 
tape or to a television 
set. 



FOR THE 
HOME 

STUDIO MAGIC is a complete "do-every- 

thing" computer production studio. In minutes 

you'll be creating exciting videos from your 

vacation, wedding and sports videos. Even 

adding television broadcast footage and com- ^^^^ 

puter graphics, as well as CD-ROMs, com- jM fe^ 

SUGGESTED RETAIL PRICE 

$499.35 



The Studio Magic main window lets you control video and audio inputs, and 
computer special effects to produce your final video output to tape or television, 



mercial videos and your 
own live camcorder. 
STUDIO 



MAGIC lets 
you edit, insert 
titles, create 
graphics and special 



Studio Mag;: i$al it ol Sludio Magic Corp. Windows is a registered trademark 

of Microsoft Corp. AH other trademarks are property ot their respective holders 




effects as well as add 
music, sound effects, 
and voice narrations. A 
free STUDIO MAGIC 

instructional video 
guides you from instal- 
lation to final cut. 

FOR THE PRO 

STUDIO MAGIC 

has the power of video 
production tools costing 
many times more but is 
as user friendly as your 
personal computer. Whether it's creating pow- 
erful sales videos, high-impact multimedia 
presentations, or slick music videos, STUDIO 
MAGIC" can save you time and money by giv- 
ing you total creative and production control. 
The STUDIO MAGIC" hardware and software 
will work with most VCRs and video cameras. 



To order Studio Magic call or write: 



STUDIO 




1690 Dell Avenue, Campbell, CA 95008 

Phone: (408) 378-3838 

Fax: (408) 378-3577 

Circle Reader Service Number 189 



THF PFRSflNAI vmFfi STiimn 




NEW MULTIMEDIA PRODUCTS 



The series covers a wide 
range of subject areas and 
incorporates multisensory 
features such as animation, 
sound, and music to provide 
an enlivening, integrated 
learning experience for a 
child. The primary objective 
of the series is to teach lan- 
guage skills, but it also cov- 
ers music appreciation, 
geography, social studies, 
and so on. 

Sitting on the Farm is the 
first title in the series. It's 
both a story and a song 
about a farm girl whose 
peaceful picnic is invaded 
by hungry animals. There 
are four levels, playable in 
all three languages, where 
children can learn and 
explore. You can also 
adjust the levels of learning. 
A parent or teacher can 
turn off certain features that 
might distract or frustrate 
younger kids. 

The Listen-along feature 
allows children to hear a 
story being read while the 
pages automatically turn. 
Read-along uses animations 
and pictures to expand 
vocabulary as the children 
read. They can click on indi- 
vidual words to hear the 
words pronounced, select a 
word to get a pictorial or ani- 
mated definition, or play any 
of the 27 reading compre- 
hension games. Using a 
microphone, a child can 
record and hear his or her 
own voice to practice pro- 
nunciation. 

Sing-along is a musical 
exploration feature that 
helps children learn con- 
cepts such as notation and 
rhythm, as they record them- 
selves singing the story's 
song along with accompa- 
nying music. The CD-ROM 
can also be used as an 
audio CD to play the more 



than 50 Red 
Book audio files. 
W r i t e - a I o n g 
encourages 
creativity as 
children com- 
pose their own 
stories to go 
with original pic- 
tures from the 
story or fill in 
blanks to write 
new stories in different set- 
tings. They can also learn 
about six geographic 
regions and the animals 
found there. Built-in sophisti- 
cated print capabilities allow 
children to print and publish 
their own stories and color- 
ing books. 

Sanctuary Woods 

(415)578-6349 

$39.95 

Circle Reader Service Number 532 




The Sound Blaster Discovery CD 16 multimedia upgrade kit 




Interplay's Classic Collection 

What a Decade! 

Feeling nostalgic? How about 
ten of the best DOS games 
from the past ten years on 
one CD-ROM? It's called the 
Classic Collection, and it's 
available through Interplay in 
honor of its tenth anniversary. 
"The Classic Collection is like 
a time capsule illustrating the 
evolution of computer games 
from the old text-based adven- 



tures to today's highly sophisti- 
cated games," says Brian 
Fargo, president of Interplay. 
The Classic Collection contains 
the following critically acclaimed 
games: Mindshadow, Tass 
Times in Tone Town, Bard's 
Tale, Wasteland, Dragon Wars, 
Battle Chess, Lord of the Rings, 
Castles, Star Trek; 25th 
Anniversary, and Out of This 
World. 

Interplay Productions 
(714)553-6655 
Price TBA 

Circle Reader Service Number 533 

Seeing Double 

Creative Labs has new ver- 
sions of its Sound Blaster 
Discovery CD 16 and Sound 
Blaster Edutainment CD 16 
kits. Both kits meet the MPC 
Level 2 specifications for 
16-bit audio and include a 
multisession double-speed 
CD-ROM drive. 

The Sound Blaster 
Discovery CD 16 kit also 
contains Aldus PhotoStyler 
SE Photo CD software, 
which allows you to access 
and manipulate Photo CD 
images quickly. In addition, 
the kit comes with a Sound 
Blaster 16 and a great col- 
lection of educational soft- 
ware, including The 
Software Toolworks Multi- 
media Encyclopedia, The 
Animals!, Where in the 
World is Carmen Sandiego? 
Deluxe Edition, and Just 



Grandma and Me. 

The Sound Blaster 
Edutainment CD 16 kit is 
aimed at the high-technolo- 
gy-entertainment enthusiast. 
It has a Sound Blaster 16; 
The Software Toolworks 
Multimedia Encyclopedia; 
Aldus PhotoSyler SE Photo 
CD software; Secret 
Weapons of the Luftwaffe; 
The Secret of Monkey 
Island; Loom; Lemmings; 
Indianapolis 500: The 
Simulation; and Sherlock 
Holmes, The Simulation. 

In other news, Creative 
Labs has announced the 
Sound Blaster 16 Value 
Edition, an entry-level prod- 
uct for the price-conscious 
consumer. It's a fully up- 
gradable Sound Blaster 
sound board featuring CD- 
quality audio, a built-in CD- 
ROM interface, and real- 
time compression and 
decompression. It features 
8- and 16-bit CD-quality 
stereo sampling and play- 
back up to 44.1 kHz. It's 
also compatible with all 
software titles written for the 
Sound Blaster platform. 

Creative Labs 

(408) 428-6600 

Sound Blaster Discovery 

CD 16— $449.95 

Sound Blaster Edutainment 

CD 16— $599.95 

Sound Blaster 16 Value 

Edition— $149.95 

Circle Reader Service Number 534. 



r^r^n *n>\ rrc 



e/J- Magical W©vld ©f 
L> earning ©n CB-t% tfe 




Written in conjunction 
with a team of educators 
from both the Montessori 
and public school systems 



AGES 3-8 



1-800-557 2633 X-600 



"i 



PiitaMitf£ 



Allie's Playhouse, 
the first and still 
preferred edutainment 
CD-ROM software 
title for pre-readers 
and above. 



Also available: 
The Musical World of 
Professor Piccolo and 
Composer Quest 



.*.PC 



Circle Reader Service Number 114 



ies Playhouse boasts an interactive environment that encourages children to 
learn about the world they live in. Allie, our little green alien friend, will act as 
tour guide through 16 different educational activities — including music, the 
alphabet, animals, the solar system and much more! Allie's Playhouse captivates 
and motivates through high quality graphics and superior 16-bit CD quality 
sound utilizing the voices of actual children and characters. 

"The Fun VVa<f to l^eam" 




Opcode Interactive" 
3950 Fabian Way 
Palo Alto, CA 94303 



Opcode Interactive • A division of Opcode Systems Inc. ;■ ' Copyright ]9M Opcode Interactive. All rights reserved. • Allie's Playhouse and The Musical World of Professor Piccolo are trademarks of OpccJe Interactive. 




MULTIMEDIA SPOTLIGHT 



By Scott A, May 



ROCK RAP 'N ROLL 

One of the most interesting 
aspects of new technology 
is its elimination of the learn- 
ing curve. Why toil through 
the basics of any subject or 
skill when the computer can 
simulate it for you? Armed 
with today's powerful cre- 
ativity software, almost any- 
one can become an instant 
artist, architect, publisher, or 
video director. 

A prime example of 
instantaneous creativity is 
Rock Rap 'N Roll, Paramount 
Interactive's award-winning 
multimedia music studio, now 
available for Windows. You 
don't have to know a chorus 
from a coda to arrange and 
record your own original 
tunes with this delightful, 
instantly accessible program. 
The only requirements are 
an ear for music and the 
desire to explore your sonic 
sensibilities. 

This is essentially the 
multimedia equivalent of a 
custom-designed, digital 
sampling synthesizer. A key 
difference is that all the sam- 
ples—hundreds of them, 
from guitar licks and drum- 
rolls to vocal bursts and 
rhythm tracks— are prere- 
corded and at your disposal. 
If you can click the mouse 
button and press a key, 
you'll soon be jamming up a 
storm, regardless of your 
musical background. It's the 
ultimate instrument for those 
who love music but can't 
play a note. 

The program is divided 
into ten musical styles, or 
studios: Africa, Big Band, 
Blues, Latin, Rap, Reggae, 
Rock, Soul, Street Jazz, and 
Techno Pop. Each studio 
contains its own library of 
unique instruments, vocals, 
and sound effects. Africa, for 
example, features a host of 

76 COMPUTE JUNE 1994 



native percussion instru- 
ments such as steel drums, 
the shofar horn, and the 
unmistakable Winky Wanger. 
In the Big Band studio, 
choose from a wide selection 
of scat vocals, baritone and 
alto saxophones, and vari- 
ous muted horns. Some 
sampled sounds are of 
questionable merit, like the 
barrage of nonsensical 
blurbs in Techno Pop and 
the use of automatic gunfire 
and police radios as rap 
instruments. Overall, howev- 



sounds in realtime, unham- 
pered by drive access. 

The basic structure and 
graphical interface are iden- 
tical for all the studios. Each 
contains a bank of ten 
unique song loops — prere- 
corded background tracks 
of various length and instru- 
mental depth. Use these to 
form the basis for your musi- 
cal excursions. Simply drag 
and drop the tokens repre- 
senting each song loop into 
the sequencer, called the 
Song-A-Lizer. As many as 



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Create your own music with Paramount Interactive's Rock Rap 'N Roll. 



er, the designers address 
the diverse musical needs of 
each style very well. 

Sound snippets are 
stored in Windows WAV for- 
mat and recorded as monau- 
ral 8-bit, but they're sampled 
at a higher rate of 22050 Hz 
for maximum clarity. When 
you select a musical style, 
the computer loads that stu- 
dio's entire sound library into 
memory. Because of this, 
you'll need at least 4MB of 
RAM, with 6MB or 8MB high- 
ly recommended. The 
advantage of this technique 
is that it gives you the ability 
to play, mix, and record 



ten loops can be used at 
one time, in any order, and 
repeated as often as you 
like. Click on the Start but- 
ton, and custom back- 
ground tracks play as a sin- 
gle loop, with seamless tran- 
sitions between sections. 

When you're ready to get 
into the groove, choose from 
one of five methods of musi- 
cal interaction. At the center 
of the screen are two of the 
program's most dynamic 
components, called Mouse 
Kickers: the Vibe-A-Tron and 
Bop-O-Rama. Sounds are 
manipulated by holding the 
mouse button and scratching 



the surface at various 
speeds, as with the finger 
pads on some MIDI key- 
boards. Pull-down menus let 
you assign virtually any 
sound to each pad. Next to 
the Mouse Kickers is the Voc- 
A-Lizer, a push-button bank 
of eight sampled vocals guar- 
anteed to enliven any song. 

The program's main 
library of sampled instru- 
ments, sound effects, and 
vocals is accessed through 
the keyboard. The top two 
rows— the numbers row and 
QWERTY row— each contain 
only 1 sound, arranged in 12 
variations of pitch. Depend- 
ing on the sound selected 
from a pop-up menu, you 
can achieve some fascinat- 
ing sound distortions. The 
bottom two rows of the key- 
board contain the remaining 
21 preset sounds. Simply 
press a key to instantly hear 
its assigned sound. A pop- 
up keymap helps you see 
what you're playing. 

Most people will find that 
not all of the included musi- 
cal styles are equally suited 
to random, impromptu jam- 
ming. The best are undoubt- 
edly Africa, Soul, Big Band, 
and Street Jazz. The Rock, 
Latin, and Techno Pop 
styles tend to produce odd 
combinations of tempos and 
ill-fitting instrumental solos. 
You may aspire for Kenny G 
and sound like Eric Dolphy, 
but don't worry about it. 
That's the challenge and 
reward of Rock Rap 'N Roll's 
remarkable musical world, 
where there are no wrong 
notes or twisted chords- 
only your imagination run- 
ning wild. 

Paramount Interactive 

(415)812-8200 

$69.95 

Circle Reader Service Number 550 



The Interactive, 
To Get Your Head 



Introducing ESPN Golf, Baseball 
and Football, all by IntelliPlay; 

Interactive, championship coaching that 
builds real skills for real players. With 
exciting sound, graphics and super-real 
sports action for your Multimedia PC or 
3D0 system, 



Multimedia Way 
In The Game 

Top athletes show you exactly how it's done. 

Tom Kite shows yau haw to lower yaur score with 
championship shot-making, driving and putting 
techinques. And major- 
college football and 
baseball players demon- 




You get personalized coach 
ing from big-name winners 

Like Tom Kite, 1992 U.S. Open Champion 

and golf's all-time money winner. Coach 

Ron Froser, two-time national baseball 

champ at the University of 

Miami, and U.S. Baseball 

Coach in the 1992 Olympic 

Games. And Coach Bill Lewis, 

UPl's 1991 college football 

Coach Of The Year and his 

Georgia Tech staff. 



II 



Total Sports Instruction 



learn at your own 
pace. Only ESPN and 
IntelliPlay give you a 
personal multimedia 
coach who's always 
ready to help you 
build winning 
s. So calll -800-357-5237 
now for names of ESPN and IntelliPlay 
dealers. And get your head in the game. 



IntelliPlay' 



FuL ; _"-.2d by Inr ..... b Spls. I;.;., Two Piedm^t Center, 5-j it 300, Albnio, Gec:g'o 30305. Phone (404) 262-0000. Fox (404) 261-2282. 
IntelliPlay is o registered tmdemcik of Inteflimedic Sports, Inc. ESPN is o registeted trademark of ESPN, Inc. The MulTt:'] PC loco is o ceiifrm'.on mark of the Multimedia PC ttcrkeling Ccjncil, Ire. 3D0 cid the 3D0 lego ore trdirncrks of The 3D0 Company. 

Circle Reader Service Number 121 



PRODUCTIVITY CHOICE 



This 600-dpi printer has the Windows 
Printing System built in, produces superb 
output, and is a snap to use. 

Clifton Karnes 



LEXMARK 
WINWRITER 600 
PRINTER 

In the dot-matrix-only days, 
printers were boring. Most peo- 
ple had to have at least one 
printer, but these contraptions 
were disturbingly loud, and 
their output was only service- 
able at best. The laser printer 
changed all that. When the la- 
ser printer was invented 
about ten years ago, people 
could produce output that re- 
ally looked great. Laser print- 
ers cranked out pages with a 
resolution of 300 x 300 dpi 
(dots per inch), and the type 
and graphics looked black, in- 
stead of a worn-out gray. Al- 
though 300 dpi looked terrific 
at first, it began to get a little 
boring, too. After a few years, 
some people noticed that 300- 
dpi graphics didn't really look 
that great, and text— especial- 
ly at small point sizes — was a 
trifle rough. 

In the last two years, how- 
ever, many printer companies 
have upped the resolution an- 
te with printers that print at 
600 x 600 dpi— which is not 
double but four times the res- 
olution of 300-dpi printers. 
The thrill is back — printers are 
exciting again! 

This is where our story 
about the Lexmark WinWriter 
600 begins. It's the newest of- 
fering in the 600-dpi class, 
and it comes with something 
extra; It is the first device 
with Microsoft at Work built in. 

The WinWriter 600 has 
three goals: to make using a 
printer easy, to produce great- 
looking output, and to be cost- 
effective. The easy-to-use 
part starts right when you 
open the box. All you need to 
do to get this printer's hard- 




wa 
and 
is 

tab from the toner 
cartridge, which is al- 
ready installed in the ma- 
chine, and attach the paper 
trays. Next, you install the Mi- 
crosoft at Work software — 
and you're ready to go! This 
is the easiest printer to set up 
I've ever used. 

On the outside, the WinWrit- 
er 600 is a dark beige box 
with a very small footprint. 
The printer comes with an in- 
ternal 200-sheet paper feeder 
and a single-sheet manual pa- 
per feeder at the rear for doc- 
uments and envelopes. Jut- 
ting out from the front of the 
printer is a paper exit tray. 
The manual paper feeder, sin- 
gle-sheet tray, and exit tray 
are all dark brown. 

Most printers have a front 
panel that looks like a weap- 
ons-control array from "Star 
Trek: The Next Generation." 
The WinWriter's front control 
panel, on the other hand, is 
simplicity itself. As you'll see 
in a minute, the printer 
doesn't need a traditional con- 
trol panel because you can 
control almost every aspect of 
the printer from your comput- 
er. The panel sports an on-off 
switch (thank you, Lexmark, 
for putting this on the front 



ot the printer), a 
pause-resume toggle, 
and a cancel button. And 
you'll notice something unusu- 
al in the upper left area above 
the on-off switch: the Win- 
dows logo. This little mark in- 
dicates the presence of the 
Windows Printing System. 

In terms of options, the 
WinWriter comes with 2MB of 
RAM (upgradable to 8MB), 
the Microsoft TrueType Font 
Pak (which includes about 40 
fonts), and a print cartridge rat- 
ed at 4000 pages (with 5-per- 
cent coverage). 

As previously mentioned, 
built into the WinWriter is the 
Windows Printing System (the 
printer component of Micro- 
soft at Work). The Windows 
Printing System, which was in- 
itially released by Microsoft 
last year as an upgrade for 
the Hewlett-Packard line of 
printers, is a software- 
and-hardware package that al- 
lows you to configure your 
printer from your computer 
and monitor its progress 
while it's printing. Let's begin 
our discussion by talking 
about some of the options 
that the Windows Printing Sys- 
tem offers. 

The main printer setup win- 



78 



COMPUTE JUNE 1994 



dow for the Windows Printing 
System is deceptively simple. 
Here, you can set the number 
of copies you want to print, 
the paper source, and the 
size and orientation (portrait 
or landscape) of pages. Noth- 
ing too exciting yet. Push the 
Options button, however, and 
the fun begins. 

In the Options dialog box, 
you'll find a selection for dou- 
ble-sided printing. If you 
choose this option, the soft- 
ware walks you through the 
process of printing on both 
sides of a page. Here's how it 
works. First the WinWriter 
prints the odd-numbered pag- 
es; then it tells you how to re- 
insert these pages into the 
printer so it can print the even- 
numbered pages on the 
back of the odd-numbered 
ones. This is pretty cool, to 
say the least. 

You'll also see an option in 
this same dialog box for turn- 
ing Power Saver on or off. 
The Power Saver feature puts 
the printer in a low-power 
state if it isn't used for a peri- 
od of time. This saves electric- 
ity without your having to turn 
the printer on and off be- 
tween printing sessions. The 
last option in this dialog box 
is for scaling, which is a use- 
ful option if you're printing 
graphics. 

A graphics setup dialog 
box lets you adjust several 
key features. You can control 
the dots per inch (300 or 
600), turn on or off PQET (Print- 
er Quality Enhancement Tech- 
nology, which offers edge- 
smoothing like Hewlett-Pack- 
ard's Resolution Enhance- 
ment Technology), and adjust 
the darkness of the printed 
graphics. A large area of this 
dialog box has options for us- 
ing gray scale, which you can 
adjust to either solid black- 



and-white, patterned grays, 
or diffuse grays. 

In addition, you can control 
the brightness and the con- 
trast of images. As if these op- 
tions weren't enough, there's 
a sample window that shows 
you how your choices will af- 
fect the printed page. 

A final section of the 
WinWriter's setup lets you con- 
figure just how the WinWriter 
software displays itself. It can 
show you the status while 
you're printing, tell you audi- 
bly about the status, and 
show you a progress bar, an 
animated diagram, or both. At 
first, you'll want all of these op- 
tions selected so that you can 
really see what WinWriter and 
the Windows Printing System 
can do. 

Now, to do some printing. 
When you choose Print from 
the File menu of a Windows 
application, the Windows Print- 
ing System printer status win- 
dow appears. This window 
has a toolbar with buttons 
that let you stop, resume, and 
delete the print job. 

Below the toolbar, you'll 
see the name of the docu- 
ment that's currently printing, 
the estimated amount of print- 
ing time left, and the estimat- 
ed time that the print job will 
finish. Below this, in the main 
window, is a cutaway view of 
the WinWriter that shows 
each sheet of paper as it trav- 
els through the printer. Below 
this there's a progress bar. If 
you have the WinWriter's 
sound option turned on, you'll 
be treated to announcements 
when the printing begins and 
ends. 

If your WinWriter should 
jam, the Windows Printing Sys- 
tem will tell you where the jam 
is and provide instructions 
about how to get the paper 
out of the machine. 



After a couple of print 
jobs, you'll notice that this print- 
er is fast. It's rated at eight 
pages per minute at 600 dpi 
and ten pages per minute at 
300 dpi. What's more impres- 
sive than these numbers, how- 
ever, is how fast the first 
page comes out of this ma- 
chine: After choosing Print, 
you'll have to wait only a cou- 
ple of seconds to see your 
page, even at 600 dpi. 



IBM PC or 
compatible (80386 
compatible), 4MB 
RAM, DOS 5 or 
higher, Windows 
3.1 or Windows for 
Workgroups 3.11— 
$1,399 



Graphics 



Print Qualify 


Qots Per Inch (dpi): 

Print Quality Enhancement (PQET): |On 


Print Darkness: (Normal 



Help 



Grayscale - Halftoning ft 

Speed: 
O Solid Black and While Q 

(§>Eatterned Grays £ lx-*M 

O Diffuse Grays ^ 58S 

Brightness: 




Features are great, but 
with printers, the bottom line 
is print quality. How does the 
WinWriter 600 rate? Its output 
is hard to beat. Pages printed 
at 600 dpi are simply beauti- 
ful—they rival those printed 
by 1000-dpi machines. The 
text is crisp, even at tiny 
point sizes, and large type 
doesn't show any jaggies— 
even on tough letters like S 
and W. The Windows Printing 
System not only extends the 
power and speed of this print- 
er, but also makes it very 
easy to use. As a bonus, the 
WinWriter costs hundreds 
less than a Hewlett-Packard 
4. This printer gets an unqual- 
ified recommendation. O 

Circle Reader Service Number 391 



Lexmark 

International 

740 New Circle fid. NW 

Lexington, KY 

40511-1876 

(800) 358-5835 



JUNE 1994 COMPUTE 79 



ONLINE 



Robert Bixby 



Searching for 

the future 

of the global 

telecommunications 

revolution 




NEW NEWS 

The many worlds of telecom- 
munications are becoming 
one world. Over time, we are 
seeing fewer differences 
among the various methods of 
communication — less division, 
more synergy. 

You can send faxes using 
your personal communicator 
and your cellular telephone, 
for example. The person receiv- 
ing the fax might also be us- 
ing a cellular telephone, a mo- 
dem, a laptop, and OCR soft- 
ware to turn the fax into a com- 
puter text file, if I want to talk 
to my son in California, I need 
only send a message on his 
beeper, and he will call me 
back within minutes. My 
friend in Ann Arbor, Michigan, 
doesn't even have an answer- 
ing machine, but I can reach 
her via the Internet anytime. 

Everything is becoming at- 
tached to everything else. It is 
becoming a small (not to men- 
tion claustrophobic) world. 

Many of the biggest stories 
on Wall Street have to do with 
telecommunications. Viacom 
purchases Paramount. Time 
Life merges with Warner Com- 
munications to form megamon- 
olith Time Warner. Bell Atlan- 
tic attempts to merge with TCI 
in an effort to "wire the world" 
(a deal that eventually falls 
through, perhaps in part be- 
cause of FCC attempts to 
keep cable prices low). 

A few things are virtually as- 
sured. Most of the nation will 
soon be "wired' 1 with fiber op- 
tics. Optical transmissions so 
dramatically broaden the band- 
width that your cable access 
will include things like movies 
on demand, a virtually unlimit- 
ed range of entertainment and 
information services, and info- 
mercials galore. But what is of 
interest to computer users is 
that fiber-optic cable will also 
provide a more efficient and 
useful means of distributing 
software (television programs, 



music, and movies are now 
called software as well, by the 
way). You'll be able to down- 
load the latest virtual-reality 
game in seconds, play it as of- 
ten as you like on a pay-per- 
play basis, and then be done 
with it. You'll never have to wor- 
ry about installation disks or 
hardware compatibility be- 
cause the bytes will come 
down the cable and the com- 
puter hardware will be as stan- 
dardized as televisions. 

But beyond these basic pre- 
dictions, any vision we can 
form of the future is probably 
wrong. The concepts of enter- 
tainment are certain to go 
through severe paradigm 
shifts over the coming years. 
Movies as we know them may 
cease to exist. They may come 
to resemble something like Ac- 
cess Software's Under a Killing 
Moon, in which you can experi- 
ence the movie from the inside, 
following leads and red her- 
rings at will, or just explore an 
alien environment in realtime — 
an alien environment populated 
by big-name stars living out a 
plot devised by the likes of El- 
more Leonard or Danielle 
Steel. If you're into music, you 
can jam elements of your favor- 
ite music videos (or even your 
favorite musicians) into a pro- 
duction created just for your- 
self. If you're into current 
events, join a salon discussing 
issues of concern. 

One thing that is definitely 
not assured at this point is 
whether you will be able to af- 
ford access. Should the gov- 
ernment provide assistance or 
tax credits for people who 
can't afford access otherwise? 
It's easy to imagine a future 
world without paper dictionar- 
ies or encyclopedias (or even 
libraries) in which cable ac- 
cess is a child's only means to 
conduct research or study for 
school. To paraphrase Ken 
Kesey, you're either on the net 
or off the net. If you're off the 
net, a world of opportunities 



and experiences might be 
closed to you. 

This column will be about 
the online experience present 
and future. I'm counting on 
you to write to me and let me 
know your thoughts, your ide- 
as, and your hopes. What do 
you think the future of online 
will hold? Does the govern- 
ment have a role to play in stan- 
dardizing or providing access 
to the online world? (Vice Pres- 
ident Al Gore seems to think 
so.) Is there any validity to the 
argument that the govern- 
ment, by its very presence, 
quashes innovation and crea- 
tivity? And if so, how will this 
manifest itself when it comes 
to the so-called information 
superhighway? 

But don't stop there. I'm al- 
so on the lookout for exciting 
things that are online now: dis- 
cussion groups, databases, 
shareware, and so on. If 
you've downloaded a file 
that's particularly useful and 
you want to tell the world 
about it or if you've picked up 
a telecommunications pro- 
gram that does it all for you, let 
me know so I can tell others. 

I'm looking for innovative 
ways to make use of what's 
available now, too. How are 
you using the powers of online 
communications to meet peo- 
ple, make money, and solve 
problems? There may be thou- 
sands of people waiting to 
hear how you do it so they can 
give it a try, too. 

If you have an idea for a sub- 
ject for this column, drop me 
a line. And if you have a ques- 
tion about telecommunica- 
tions, this is the place to ask. 

Write to me (or any of the ed- 
itors) at COMPUTE Publica- 
tions, 324 West Wendover Ave- 
nue, Suite 200, Greensboro, 
North Carolina 27408. My fax 
number is (910) 275-9837; my 
CompuServe ID is 75300, 
3671; and my AOL handle is 
RBixby. I'd love to hear what 
you have to say. □ 



80 COMPUTE JUNE 1994 



A PCMCIA Modem Is A Lot 

Like An Oreo; 




The Stuff That Matters Is Inside. 



Anyone can whip up a modem with 
an off-the-shelf chip set and someone 
else s technology. In fact, that's exactly 
what most PCMCIA manufacturers do. 
The WorldPortr however, is no cookie- 
cutter modem. 

Inside every high-speed WorldPort is 
U.S. Robotics 1 Courier DSP-based tech- 




Only the WorldPort features the revolutionary 
SmartPlu^ eliminating the need for an adapter. 

nology. The same modem technology ^ u * modems with built-in phone jacks, 

iji- • l'l there are no exposed wires. The WorldPort is inter- 

implemented by major companies like ^^hmhavllaman* 

CompuServe, DuPont, General Electric 
and U.S. West. This core technology makes 
the WorldPort fast, accurate and easy to use. 
The WorldPort runs at fax or 
data speeds up to 14,400 
bps. (57,600 bps with 
data compression.) And 
with QuickConnect, IM a The intelligent Choice in Data Communications 



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U.S. Robotics' exclusive, it handshakes 
and gets to work in under 10 seconds. 

With Adaptive Speed Leveling (ASL)™ 
another USR exclusive, the WorldPort makes 
the most of inconsistent phone lines, slow- 
ing down for bad connections, and 
speeding right up again when condi- 
tions improve. 

The WorldPort is also highly intuitive. The 
setup is easy. The commands are flexible. 
Its my easy to use, 

Getting the WorldPort is easy, too. Its 
just $339, including fax and communi- 
cation software. 

If you'd like to know more 
about the WorldPort and 
what it can do for you, call 
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U S. Robotics ?nd ehc I'SRob^o ' %<, m rcgisural md mirks ol US Roix^ Inc. WoAfibi, ASL (Actynvi Sped taking), QjickOmiM and SmarcPiiigaiv tiacbnaiis osT.S, Robotics. Orao is a n^aotd caicmark of NAB!SCO FOODS. Inc. 

Circle Reader Service Number 112 



DISCOVERY CHOICE 



Children will be fascinated by African animals 
and music as they develop basic 
skills in this natural learning adventure. 

Peter Scisco 



ZURK'S LEARNING 
SAFARI 

The Serengeti in Tanzania 
isn't the first place parents 
look for high-tech learning ex- 
periences to share with their 
kids. But it's an ideal location; 
children are fascinated by 
wild animals. Now you can 
take them on a wilderness ex- 
cursion like no other. Zurk's 
Learning Safari, from Soieil 
Software, brings the creatures 
of Africa to young discover- 
ers, teaching basic skills in a 
natural environment. 

Zurk, an electronic elf, 
leads the way through various 
activities, from a simple adven- 
ture to challenging jigsaw puz- 
zles. Throughout, the African 
theme embellishes the pro- 
gram with interesting pictures, 
music, and possibilities. 

At the opening screen, 
where a lion cub is perched 
on the arm of an easy chair 
with a bespectacled lion fa- 
ther reading from a story- 
book, kids and parents select 
any of the program's six activ- 
ities: Zurk's Magic Box, 
Zurk's Puzzles, Alphabet 
Soup, Animal Picture Book, 
Hide and Seek, and Maya's 
Adventure. 

The simplest activity, 
Zurk's Magic Box teaches 
shape recognition. Even very 
young children can open the 
box by matching two shapes 
that appear on its front. If, for 
example, a large crescent 
and a small circle decorate 
the box, your child must click 
on the box, cycling through 
the smaller shapes until a 
match appears. After making 
the match, your child is reward- 
ed with a brief animated se- 
quence featuring Zurk. 

Zurk's Puzzles will entertain 
the youngest children as well 




as their older siblings. The sim- 
plest puzzle, an elephant, 
shows lines that indicate the 
shape of the pieces that are 
to fit in specific places, much 
like the beginning wooden 
and cardboard puzzles sold 
in toy stores. A child drags a 
piece onto the puzzle, and it 
snaps to the screen when it's 
on the correct spot. 

The pig puzzle, which 
doesn't assist with shape 
lines, will challenge older 
kids, and the most ambitious 
puzzle solvers can tackle the 
landscape puzzle. This puz- 
zle begins with basic shapes 
like squares, circles, and 
hearts, and then uses oddly 
shaped pieces that encour- 
age real logical thinking. 

Rounding out the puzzle 
games are a letter recognition 
puzzle (put the alphabet on a 
crocodile's back) and a count- 
ing (to ten) puzzle, both suit- 
able for kids ages 4-6. 

The same ages will have 
fun building letter recognition 
skills with Alphabet Soup. In 
this game, they match letters 



that float in a bowl of soup 
with the same letters that ap- 
pear in a border around the 
edge of the screen. Zurk 
makes an appearance here, 
running around the border 
and disappearing beneath 
one of the letter tiles. 

To make Zurk reappear, chil- 
dren must select the floating 
letter that matches the tile hid- 
ing him. If they're successful, 
Zurk lets out a gleeful yelp be- 
fore running and hiding under 
another letter. The game con- 
tinues until the child has 
matched all of the letters in 
the alphabet. Wrong answers 
aren't punished — but Zurk 
won't emerge until the correct 
answer is chosen. 

When a letter is selected, it 
rises from the bowl, trans- 
forms into an animal, and 
then changes back into the let- 
ter. Audio-equipped comput- 
ers pronounce the letter, 
speak the name of the ani- 
mal, and then pronounce the 
letter again. Such audio rein- 
forcement is instrumental in 
helping kids memorize letters. 



82 COMPUTE JUNE 1994 



The soup bowl uses upper- 
case letters; the alphabet puz- 
zle, lowercase. Parents can't 
switch from upper- to lower- 
case, so children have to 
move between the games for 
practice with both cases. 

Animal Picture Book con- 
tains drawings of each of the 
31 animals featured through- 
out the program. Not an alpha- 
bet book with animals from A 
to Z, the book attempts to 
strengthen early reading 
skills. Kids also become famil- 
iar with many of the animals in- 
digenous to the African conti- 
nent and can hear the ani- 
mals' names pronounced by 
clicking on the pictures. 

The last two activities in 
Zurk's Learning Safari are 
more ambitious and will ap- 
peal to kids up to age 7. In 
Hide and Seek, kids hide ten 
animals in a Serengeti land- 
scape. As they hide the ani- 
mals, they learn (with their par- 
ents' helpful direction) how 
animals use camouflage to 
protect themselves. A green 
turtle may hide among green 
lily pads on a pond, while a 
gray .lizard may become a 
shadow against a gray rock. 
Siblings can be encouraged 
to play together, one hiding an- 
imals and the other finding 
them. 

The second half of this 
game works in the opposite di- 
rection: The computer hides 
the creatures, and the kids 
must find them. This is like an 
electronic version of the pop- 
ular hidden-picture puzzles in 
many kids' magazines. 

Hide and Seek opens itself 
to many different ways to 
play, and it gives parents a 
chance to talk about other sub- 
jects away from the comput- 
er. It's a good way to start con- 
versations about prey and 
predators as well as the wild- 



life of Africa, for instance. 

Maya's Adventure rounds 
out the program's activities. 
Children help Maya, a lost li- 
on cub, find her family. Kids 
use the mouse to move the li- 
on cub around the screen. Ma- 
ya seeks assistance from her 
animal friends by poking at 
them with her paw. On three 
of the panels (the entire adven- 
ture takes place on six pan- 
els, but only three are interac- 
tive), kids must find the right 
animal friend and then follow 
that friend to the next panel. 
At the end of the adventure, 
Maya is reunited with her moth- 
er and father. 

Throughout, Zurk's Learn- 
ing Safari is lovingly illustrat- 
ed. Both the animated se- 
quences and the background 
pictures are rendered in fine 
detail. The narration, pronun- 
ciations, and sound effects 
do much to enhance the learn- 
ing and playing experience. 

Special attention must be 
given to the music, which is in- 
spired by African instruments. 
For that alone, Zurk's Learn- 
ing Safari deserves praise. Pur- 
ists may wish for exacting Af- 
rican tunes, but Zurk's West- 
ern accommodation helps to 
introduce children (and par- 
ents) to the polyrhythmic 
sounds they might not other- 
wise hear. Too few American 
kids get a chance to appreci- 
ate the musical heritage of an- 
other culture. 

The game's sound effects 
are generally well designed 
and used to great effect, 
from Zurk's high-pitched gig- 
gles to letter pronunciations. 
However, in a program that 
features so many animals, it's 
curious that animal sounds 
are not included in the audio 
repertoire. Perhaps the idea 
is that such an inclusion 
would distract early learners 



from the lessons that form the 
core of the program. 

Zurk's Learning Safari also 
gets a good score for its brief 
manual, which introduces 
each game with a rhyme and 
suggests activities for parents 
and kids that can be enjoyed 
at or away from the computer. 

A few technical notes bear 
mentioning. Online help is not 
available; the conventional 
use of the F1 key to summon 
help is likely to cause a sys- 



IBM PC or 
compatible (16- 
MHz 80386 or 
faster), 2MB RAM, 
VESA-compatible 
256 color VGA, 
hard drive with 
8MB tree, mouse; 
supports most 




w ft r 1% 



tern crash. Potential buyers 
should also be aware that the 
game requires a VESA-com- 
patible video card with 512K 
of video RAM. Most contempo- 
rary cards will meet this spec- 
ification, and Soleil provides 
VESA drivers with the pro- 
gram. But if you own a ma- 
chine that's more than two 
years old, you should check 
your manual to make sure 
you have what's required. 

On balance, Zurk's Learn- 
ing Safari is a fine example of 
state-of-the-art preschool soft- 
ware. Parents in the hunt for 
early reading and discovery 
software can add this to their 
trophy room of captivating 
teaching tools. 

Circle Reader Service Number 392 



sound cards and 
devices— $59.95 

SOLEIL SOFTWARE 

Distributed by 

Knowledge 

Adventure 

4502 Dyer SL 

La Crescenta, CA 

91214 

(800) 542-4240 



JUNE 1994 COMPUTE 83 



THE 



RO NE OF CHAOS 




he Dark Army encroaches. 
King Richard falls. And Scotia 
beckons you, laughing... 



In her mad quest for power, Scotia has ravaged the 

kingdom. She seeks the throne, yet it eludes her. 

She's getting desperate. She's getting mean. 














OU STOP HER? DO YOU DARE? 








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AN INSPIRED FANTASY 

RPG EXPERIENCE FROM 

THE DEVELOPMENT 

TEAM THAT CREATED 

EYE OF THE BEHOLDER™ I AND II. 

Westwo< 

Available for your IBM PC. 






lif 



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Eye of the Beholder I and II are trademarks of TSR, Inc. 

The Eye of the Beholder games,TSR, Inc. and SSI are not connected or related 



mark 







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Circle Reader Service Numt 



GAME INSIDER 



Peter Olafson 




Goodbye to SSI's 

AD&D:TSR 

and SSI will go 

their separate 

ways at the end 

ofl 994. 



&D, R.I.P.? 

It will end where it began, with 
a game set in the Forgotten 
Realms. The relationship be- 
tween Strategic Simulations, 
Inc. and TSR, which produced 
about 30 computer games 
over a period of eight years, 
will draw to a close with the 
Christmas release of a role- 
playing game with the working 
title of Menzoberranzan. 

A joint statement announc- 
ing the decision didn't offer 
any explanation beyond that 
"the time has come for both 
companies to pursue their 
own interests." However, a 
source indicated that the split 
was the product of a shared 
sense that each company had 
drawn what it could from their 
affiliation. 

It's an amicable separation, 




and it doesn't mean SSI and 
TSR won't work together in the 
future. (In other words, TSR 
could conceivably terminate 
but stay resident.) 

Both companies are al- 
ready at work on their inde- 
pendent futures. TSR is assem- 
bling a software development 
team with hopes of releasing 
new games under its own la- 
bel in 1995, and it will contin- 
ue to license properties to out- 
side game developers. SSI 
has an in-house team eager to 
get underway on an ambitious 
new RPG project which isn't ex- 
pected to surface until 1995. 



Of course, the TSR alliance 
isn't over yet. SSI's AD&D 
plans for the remainder of 
1994 also call for release of 
Ravenloft: Strahd's Posses- 
sion and the entry-level, vide- 
ogamelike RPG Al-Qadim: 
The Genie's Curse (both of 
which should be out now), as 
well as Dark Sun II: Wake of 
the Ravager (which should be 
out this summer). 

Also on tap from SSI is War- 
game Construction Set II, a 
game using tanks from 1918 
to 1991, which should be out 
by the time you read this. The 
New Age fantasy RPG called 
Alien Logic, based on the ta- 
bletop game SkyRealms of 
Jorune, is slated for June. Pan- 
zer General, an SVGA war 
game, should ship around Ju- 
ly. Sports buffs will want to 
watch for All-Star Hockey, due 
in September, while strate- 
gists should look for Secret Mis- 
sions, a space simulation in 
the style of Renegade Legion: 
Interceptor, late in the year. 

Beyond that, SSI is linking 
up with Germany's Blue Byte 
again for the imminent release 
of The Settlers (retitled Serf 
City: Life is Feudal for the 
U.S.). The game is a joy: A ful- 
ly developed nation swarms 
with Lemming-sized people 
building a wide range of struc- 
tures, chopping up trees and 
boulders, processing materi- 
als, carting off finished 
goods, mining, fishing, farm- 
ing, and fighting with the neigh- 
bors. It's like an animated, me- 
dieval take on a Where's Wat- 
do? scene. 

Shopping overseas. SSI 
isn't the only U.S. label bring- 
ing software over the Pond. 
Consider MicroLeague Interac- 
tive, those not-just-sports 
folks who recently released 
U.S. versions of Body Blows 
and Alien Breed (both from 
England's Team 17). It has 
hooked up with Germany's Star- 
byte label and is slated to 
bring over at least six games 



this year: Bazooka Sue, Big 
Sea, Hannibal, Hoogy, Rings 
of Medusa Gold, and Space 
Job. Hannibal, the first to ap- 
pear, is an elaborate and hand- 
some historical sim based on 
the Carthaginian leader's at- 
tempt to conquer Rome. 

And while we're on the sub- 
ject, look for the Breach-like 
Sabre Team, the clever ar- 
cade game Soccer Kid, and 
the impressively lit RPG Shad- 
owWorlds to turn up as a re- 
sult of MicroLeague's affilia- 
tion with England's Krisalis. 

Domark is set to release Eng- 
lish developer Mike Single- 
ton's Lords of Midnight in 
June. Like his earlier games 
(Midwinter, Flames of Free- 
dom, and Ashes of Empire), 
this realtime fantasy RPG is 
vast in scope. Unlike the ear- 
lier games in the series, it per- 
mits you to bounce between 
four parties roaming a Coman- 
che-like texture-mapped, frac- 
tally generated landscape. 

PenUltima? Origin's Ultima 
VIII: Pagan represents the big- 
gest change in the long-run- 
ning role-playing series since 
Ultima VI introduced the Ava- 
tar to a real-world environment 
back in 1990. 

For one thing, it's the first so- 
lo Ultima (if you don't count 
the Underworld games), with 
your pals lolo, Dupre, and 
Shamino nowhere to be 
found. Also, the camera has 
moved in for a closeup of the 
action this time, with the Ava- 
tar more than 2 1 /2 times larger 
on the screen than in Ultima 
VII. That, in combination with 
the large number of moves 
your character can perform, 
lends itself to a better sensa- 
tion of "being there." 

And while not so large in ar- 
ea as its predecessors, Pagan 
is rendered in enormous de- 
tail — there's said to be ten 
times more artwork in this ver- 
sion. At this rate of advance- 
ment, how far are we from vir- 
tual-reality Ultima? n 



86 



COMPUTE JUNE 1994 



INTRODUCING 

THE EXPERIENCE OF REAL PINBALL 



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AMTEX, the maker of 
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After chalking up, youll bank shots, rack up bonus points, 
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ENTERTAINMENT CHOICE 



■■■ 



Beware: This lavish adult thriller 
could evoke nightmares as you work 
through its adventure. 

Scott A. May 



GABRIEL KNIGHT: 
SINS OF THE 
FATHERS 

Early computer games relied 
heavily on movies for creativi- 
ty and direction, often ending 
up as pale reflections of their 
celluloid inspirations. Times 
are changing, however, and it 
won't be surprising if film- 
makers begin looking to enter- 
tainment software for big, 
fresh ideas. Sierra On-Line's 
Gabriel Knight: Sins of the Fa- 
thers is a prime candidate for 
such creative role reversal. 

Writer and director Jane 
Jensen shines in her first solo 
project, a solid follow-up to 
last year's successful collabo- 
ration with Roberta Williams in 
King's Quest VI: Heir Today, 
Gone Tomorrow. Jensen's 
dark, sensuous style stands 
in stark contrast to Williams's 
light fantasy — a distinction 
that will delight most adven- 
ture fans and disturb others. 

A parental warning label ac- 
companies the game, caution- 
ing that much of its material is 
inappropriate for young play- 
ers. Indeed, the product con- 
tains a fair amount of ritualis- 
tic violence, partial nudity, 
and profanity. As is not the 
case with many other adult 
games, however, such explic- 
it content is neither gratuitous 
nor inconsequential to the sto- 
ry. Sierra is to be commend- 
ed for publishing an original 
thriller aimed at intelligent, ma- 
ture audiences. 

Immediately, a necroman- 
tic mood is established by vir- 
tue of the setting: the enigmat- 
ic, multicultural milieu of New 
Orleans. There, you step into 
the troubled life of Gabriel 
Knight, a young writer re- 
searching a book on voodoo. 




Gabe is 
plagued by 
terrifying, vio- 
lent nightmares; 
his psychological well-being 
is tested as he becomes em- 
broiled in a string of brutal 
homicides known locally as 
the Voodoo Murders. Subse- 
quent investigation reveals hor- 
rific secrets in his family's 
past. As Gabe, you learn 
you're the last in a long line of 
Schatten Jager, or Shadow 
Hunters, whose fate is to 
fight dark, supernatural pow- 
ers. Suddenly, both the night- 
mares and the murders take 
on new significance, as you 
race to piece together clues 
before it's too late. 

Included is a short, hand- 
somely drawn graphic novella 
designed to evoke vague, but 
compelling, story ambiance. 
It tells a tragic tale of love, be- 
trayal, and ancient evil. Writ- 
ten by Jensen and illustrated 
by Terese Nielsen, it captures 
the imagination, compelling 
players to seek the modern 
connection between this Faust- 
ian tale and the game's mod- 
ern hero. Nielsen's dark, dis- 
turbing visions carry over to 
many of the game's hand- 



painted back- 
drops, drawn 
from a gloomy 
palette of deep 
red, blue, and black. Gabe's 
recurring nightmare sequenc- 
es are particularly well de- 
signed and smoothly animat- 
ed, rendered at a higher-res- 
olution VGA (640 x 480) than 
the bulk of the game's im- 
agery (320 x 200). 

Sierra continues to improve 
its mouse-driven icon inter- 
face, utilizing several new ad- 
ditions here with great suc- 
cess. Controlling your on- 
screen character is simply a 
matter of changing the 
mouse pointer to an icon rep- 
resenting various actions: a 
boot (walk), a Mardi Gras 
mask (look), a hand (pick up), 
gears (operate), and so on. 

New to the Sierra interface 
is support for both two- and 
three-button mice, allowing 
you to move even faster 
through the available icon 
commands. A pop-up icon 
bar allows access to your in- 
ventory and hand-held tape re- 
corder, an interesting innova- 
tion that automatically tapes 
conversations held in interro- 
gation mode. A separate inven- 



COMPUTE JUNE 1994 



tory of labeled cassettes lets 
you review the indexed topics 
of prior conversations. It's a 
fun gadget and an invaluable 
tool for tracking clues and re- 
viewing character dialogue. 

The game contains an in- 
triguing number of realtime 
interactive puzzles. Most bi- 
zarre are the voodoo and 
drum code interfaces, where 
you must learn to interpret 
and construct messages 
from cryptic symbols and 
drumbeats. Such diversions 
add variety to gameplay and 
depth to the story line. Most 
puzzles follow standard adven- 
ture protocol, requiring you to 
find and use objects gath- 
ered from numerous loca- 
tions. The game's adult rating 
also applies to its difficulty lev- 
el — it's decidedly not for begin- 
ners. With few exceptions, puz- 
zle solutions are forthright 
and logical, although anytime 
magic comes into play, you 
can expect a fair number of un- 
usual twists. 

Sizewise, the game 
spreads itself over dozens of 
exciting locations. It contains 
several paths to the story's 
conclusion — some direct, oth- 
ers far richer in atmosphere 
and character development. 

Like most current Sierra ad- 




CD-ROM version 



ventures, Gabriel Knight runs 
equally well under either DOS 
or Windows. An enhanced 
CD-ROM edition adds option- 
al character speech through- 
out the game. Though not a 
necessary ingredient for full en- 
joyment of the story, the pro- 
fessional-quality speech fur- 
ther enriches an already ex- 
pressive script. Experience 
the all-talking version, and 
you'll be spoiled for anything 
less. Another bonus for CD 
gamers is the 20-minute vid- 
eo for Windows, The Making 
of Gabriel Knight, a fascinat- 
ing look behind the produc- 
tion, including interviews with 
Jensen and many of the 
game's principal performers. 

Beyond speech, however, 
it's discouraging to note no oth- 
er audfo enhancements. Giv- 
en the nature of the story and 
its exotic locales, true audio- 
CD background music 
would've been a simple, yet 
dynamic, addition. At best, 
the program provides en- 
hanced ten-channel sound 
for music devices compatible 
with Windows Extended MIDI. 

Among the voice talents re- 
cruited for the CD version are 
Tim Curry in the title role and 
Mark Hamill as Detective Mose- 
ly. Curry affects a deep South- 
ern drawl thicker than week- 
old gumbo and twice as spicy. 
Disconcerting at first — particu- 
larly to those unfamiliar with 
this unique regional accent — 
Curry's strong vocal character- 
ization tends to grow on you. 
Other notable cast members in- 
clude Michael Dorn (best 
known as Worf on "Star Trek: 
The Next Generation") as Dr. 
John, Leah Remini (of "Eve- 
ning Shade") as the wisecrack- 
ing Grace, and Hollywood vet- 
eran Efrem Zimbalist Jr. as 
Wolfgang. The voice you 
hear most often is that of 



Tony winner Virginia Capers, 
whose narration absolutely 
drips with slow, zesty Creole 
flavor. Emmy winner Stuart M. 
Rosen directs the large ensem- 
ble of actors, as he did on Si- 
erra's bestselling King's 
Quest VI CD. 

The CD edition also offers 
a choice between full (33MB), 
medium (20MB), and tiny 
(1MB) hard disk installation, 
plus an additional 4MB of 



IBM PC or 
compatible (25- 
MHz 80386 or 
faster, 80486 
recommended for 
Windows 3.1 or 
higher), 4MB RAM, 
DOS 5.0 or higher, 
256-color VGA, 
hard drive, high- 




high-resolution segues and 
cut scenes. The more of the 
game you install to disk, the 
more smoothly it will run at 
the publisher's minimum sys- 
tem configuration. The story's 
deliberate pace, on the other 
hand, allows those with an 
80486-based system to run 
the program almost entirely 
from CD with no compromise 
in speed. Internal game con- 
trols allow you to fine-tune an- 
imation speed and detail to 
best suit your machine. 

It would be exaggerating 
to claim Gabriel Knight: Sins 
of the Fathers redefines its par- 
ticular genre. In terms of intel- 
ligent and original adult enter- 
tainment, however, Jensen 
and company display creativ- 
ity and style that's bound to 
make Hollywood sit up and 
take notice. CI 

Circle Reader Service Number 393 



density floppy 
drive, mouse, MPC 
Level 1 CD-ROM 
drive (lor CD-ROM 
version); supports 
most major sound 
cards— $69.95 
(disk), $79.95 (CD- 
ROM) 

SIERRA ON-LINE 
P.O. Box 485 
Coarsegold, CA 
93614 
(800) 326-6654 



JUNE 1994 COMPUTE 89 



GAMEPLAY 



Denny Atkin 




F-14 Fleet 

Defender opens 

a new era 

of quality for 

MicroProse 

flight simulations. 



TOMCAT 
UNLEASHED 

"Contacts 75, 20" warns the E- 
2C Hawkeye early-warning air- 
craft. I jerk the stick to the left 
and turn my Tomcat on the vec- 
tor. "Bogey locked!" the GIB 
confirms. I center the target- 
ing reticle on the heads-up dis- 
play, select an AIM-7 Sparrow 
missile, and squeeze the trig- 
ger. "Fox 2," I calmly call out 
as I watch the missile's trail 
stream away from my F-14. 
Suddenly a report comes in 
from the Hawkeye: "Su-27 hit 
by AIM-7." Feeling a bit proud 
of myself, I get ready to check 
with the GIB to see if there are 
any other targets in the area. 
"Launch! Launch!" he 
screams before I can open my 
mouth, and I drop chaff and 




head for the deck. Looks like 
our target had four buddies — 
I tell my wing man to clear my 
tail and then I radio to the For- 
restal asking for Ready 1 as- 
sistance. Looks like it's going 
to be a long afternoon. 

F-14 Fleet Defender is so ac- 
tion packed that it makes Top 
Gun seem more like Remains 
of the Day. Earlier Micro Prose 
flight simulators were heavy 
on arcade elements and light 
on realism. They generally fea- 
tured "you against the world" 
scenarios, where you were 
just about the only allied 
plane in the sky and entire air 



forces would go into the air to 
get you. Flight models weren't 
very realistic, and there were 
terrible technical inaccura- 
cies, such as land-based F- 
15Eand F-117A fighters oper- 
ating off of aircraft carriers. 
They were fun, but as games, 
not as simulations of real-life 
air combat. 

MicroProse has made a 
quantum leap in realism with 
F-14 Fleet Defender. You now 
fly as part of a combat pack- 
age and always have a wing 
man on your side. There are 
dozens of other aircraft in the 
skies, enemy and allied, each 
with its own mission that may 
not involve you at all. The 
flight models and weapons per- 
formance seem dead-on accu- 
rate to this aviation buff. 

The game is set in the mid 
1980s, with both historical (the 
attack on Libya) and World 
War III scenarios. You pilot the 
two-seat, twin-engine Grum- 
man F-14 Tomcat, the fighter 
that Maverick and Goose flew 
in Top Gun. The F-14 is an ex- 
citing plane to fly. Designed 
in the late 1960s, it predates 
the superpowerful engines 
and fly-by-wire controls of the 
more commonly simulated F- 
16 and F/A-18. Because 
you're not in a superplane, 
you get a better feeling of 
flying than in the "electric 
jets." You can jump to the 
back seat to operate the radar 
or just let the computer han- 
dle the GIB (Guy In Back) 
functions. 

Fleet Defender's graphics, 
in and out of the cockpit, are 
spectacular. The F-14s are ren- 
dered with incredible detail- 
watching the big elevons twist 
as you turn the plane, you feel 
as if you're watching a slightly 
fuzzy video of a real fighter jet. 
The planes even have authen- 
tic squadron markings on 
their tails. The sky is beautiful— 
when you're flying below 
storm clouds, everything's 
murky and low-contrast, but 



zoom above them and your 
view is suddenly sharp and 
bright. 

There's a wide variety of mis- 
sions to fly, all of them air-to- 
air. The Tomcat is an intercep- 
tor, so you'll fly cover for the air- 
to-mud jockeys. Enemy Al is 
very good at the highest lev- 
els; the computer-controlled 
planes are deadly when they 
start using the vertical. The 
game is extremely authentic 
and challenging, but the real- 
ism is adjustable so that begin- 
ners won't be overwhelmed. 

The only things lacking are 
modem play, a mission plan- 
ner, and a replay mode. Since 
the game has graphics that sur- 
pass Strike Commander's and 
realism that approaches Fal- 
con 3.0's, many sim fans will 
be willing to overlook those 
omissions. This is just the first 
sim from a new MicroProse, 
one that simulation fans will 
want to keep a close eye on. 

Castles Too. My other favor- 
ite addiction this month has 
been the new CD-ROM ver- 
sion of Castles II: Siege & Con- 
quest, from Interplay. You're a 
medieval baron out to build an 
empire and eventually accede 
to the throne. You build diplo- 
matic alliances and conquer 
weaker enemies in an effort to 
expand your power. To fortify 
your territories, you can build 
castles in them, and this is 
half the fun — you design your 
own castle and then allocate 
resources to its construction. 

The CD-ROM edition adds 
over 30 minutes of BBC docu- 
mentary footage on castle his- 
tory and construction tech- 
niques; the full-motion video 
used here looks pretty good. 
Some classic film footage is in- 
terspersed through the game; 
and more than five hours of dig- 
ital speech, including a spo- 
ken tutorial, have been added. 
Finally, there are ten new his- 
torical castles which you can 
use or study for tips in design- 
ing your own. □ 



90 COMPUTE JUNE 1994 



Hie vvv Dug e> iiuw u jneueueb 
with all the options/' 



"Winner: Adventure Game 
of the Year/' 

\ . . a monumental adventure game, destined to 
become as much a classic as the original." 

BUSINESS WW 

"Pumped~up software . . . radical transformations." 



"Return to Zork opens nostalgically, 
and then things start to run and 
jump and shout and sing/' 



More praise tha 
we can prin * 

More adventure than 
you can ask for. 



"Winner: CD-ROM Game of the Year." 

"A truly amazing, next-generation product, 
of such unparalleled quality that it must 
become the model for all tomorrow's designers." 



"... the best use of full-motion video in 
any CD-ROM game ... 
You're not watching a movie. 
You're in the movie." 






Stunning computer-generated 



"A beautiful, engrossing game , . .* 
with a ground-breaking interface," 

PC ZOHE 

"Return to Zork leapfrogs far beyond 
the shoulders of its ancestors and lands 
smack bang in the land of complete up-to-dateness." 

"Winner: Adventure Game of the Year." 



A cast of 23 actors with over 
an hour of interactive dialogue. 




"One of the most technically 
advanced and artistically satisfying 
computer games you'll ever 

" have the pleasure to die in." -. - 

C tftaGQ TRIBOHE 

"Top 10 electronic selection." 

PCFORM 

"A rollicking adventure that will test 
the mettle of even the most wordly 
of adventiJife gamers." 

"It's the gameplay that counts and 
Return to Zork is great." 



Serious puzzles with 
a sense of humor 



An epic adventure . . . underground, 

RETURN TO 




inFOConv. Now available for Macintosh® CD. AcliVisiOH 

See your local retailer or call 1-800-477-3650. MS-DOS CD-ROM and 3.5" disk versions available. 



Circle Reader Service Number 242 



m Tfm : : 




1 

1 


1 


Jj*mmmmmmw*nmmm 


i 


1 1 A? 1 


-ii •! 1 


m ■ 

I 1 w 


1 w 1 




111 


jIP 



PC game controllers give you 

complete control of 

your Journeys through virtual realities. 



Ill J*\£li 



Did Luke Skywalker destroy the Death 
Star by hitting the Return key? Did 
Pappy Boyington become the Marines' 
top World War II ace by mastering the cursor 
keypad? Did Nigel Mansell become a top- 
ranked Indy car driver by learning to steer with 
a mouse? Of course not. So why are you still 
playing PC games using the keyboard and 
mouse? Grab a joystick, yoke, or game pad 
and take control! 

You can turn your businesslike PC into one 
of the hottest game machines this side of an 
Air Force flight simulator, but to do so you'll 
need a controller that sizzles. Luckily, today's 
PC game controllers bear little resemblance to 
the fragile rubber-and-plastic digital joysticks 
of Atari VCS days. Whether you're looking for a 
simple game pad to play arcade games like 
Doom or a 3-D control device to explore virtual 
reality universes, you'll find a wealth of avail- 
able choices. 

Any Port in a Storm? 

There are a few things to consider as you get 
ready to select a controller. If you're going to 



add a game controller to your system, you'll 
need a joystick port on your PC. Many sys- 
tems now ship with a joystick port included as 
part of a multifunction card or sound card. 
However, those ports generally don't work well 
on fast systems, and some don't support the 
extra lines necessary for using a second joy- 
stick or a joystick with multiple buttons and a 
throttle. Your best bet is to buy a dedicated 
speed-adjustable game card; you'll find that 
top-quality offerings from Advanced Gravis, 
CH Products, and ThrustMaster generally sell 
for about $25 on the street. 

Playing on Your Lap 

Until recently, most laptop computer users 
were stuck with using the keyboard for game 
control if they didn't have a docking station 
with a joystick adapter plugged into an expan- 
sion slot. Now there are two solutions for gam- 
ing on the road. (Both of these will also work 
with desktop PCs, but a dedicated game card 
is a better choice there.) 

Colorado Spectrum's Notebook Gameport 
connects to the serial port of your laptop and 



By Denny Atkin 



includes a pass-through for your 
mouse. It fully supports two sets of 
joystick lines, so you can use four-but- 
ton sticks, throttles, and rudder ped- 
als. Colorado Spectrum is depending 
on developers to add support for the 
Notebook Gameport to their games, 
so you 1 !! want to check to make sure 
that your favorite simulations support 
it. I used it with F-15 Strike Eagle III on 
a Gateway HandBook486, and it 
worked splendidly. 

Genovation's Parallel Game Port 
also supports two sets of joystick 
lines, but it connects to your parallel 
port. Instead of relying on developer 
support, Genovation has created its 
own drivers for dozens of games. This 
approach means drivers are available 
for some old, but still popular, games 
that had no hope of being updated by 
the publisher for laptop compatibility. 

Total Control 

Demanding game players are no 
longer satisfied with a simple two-but- 
ton joystick. In order to avoid having 
to reach for the keyboard in the midst 
of the action, they seek out one of the 
new top-of-the-line multifunction 
sticks. These use the extra data lines 
that are assigned to a second joystick 
to add more buttons, throttle 
control, and even rudder 
control. 

QuickShot's Super Warrior 
is a good choice if you're 
looking for an inexpensive full- 
function joystick for flight sim- 
ulations. It sports four fire but- 
tons, a throttle control dial, a 
gimballed stick mount, suc- 
tion cups for desk mounting, 
and a cushioned rubber 
"BioGrip" panel on the back 
of the control stick. Like most 
of the QuickShot controllers, 
the Super Warrior has a turbo 
fire switch that, when select- 
ed, will make the fire buttons 
send rapid pulses to the com- 
puter when you hold them 
down. This is great for saving 
wear and tear on your trigger 
finger in games that don't have their 
own automatic fire functions. 

Suncom's FX2000 has the most far- 
out design of any of the controllers I 
looked at — this stick would look right at 
home on the control panel of a Martian 
War Machine. It's billed as "the ultimate 
flight control stick." Well, not on this 
planet. It has only two fire buttons and 
a very limited stick throw range. 
There's a throttle control dial on the 
front of the stick, but it's mounted so 
that you rotate it left to right instead of 
front to back, which doesn't feel natur- 
al. Also, the throttle feels like a leftover 

94 COMPUTE JUNE 1994 



volume control from a transistor 
radio — it even clicks when you move it 
from the off position. The FX2000 does 
have switchable autofire and suction 
cup mounts. Unfortunately, the FX2000 
sacrifices functionality for form. 

A much better effort from Suncom 
is the superb FlightMAX Advanced 
Flight Control console. This hefty con- 
troller includes a very comfortable 
stick with two fire buttons. You can use 
a switch to select whether to use the 
throttle control on the left or right side 
of the stick, a feature that makes this 
the premier multifunction stick for left- 
ies. Suncom's Saturn Ring stick mount 




Laptop control: Colorado Spectrum's 
Notebook Gameport and Genovation's 
Parallel Game Port. 




Stick to 
FX2000, 



it: The Suncom FlightMAX, CH FiightStick Pro, Suncom 
Gravis Analog Pro, and CH Jetstick. 



gives the stick equal tension in all 
directions, making it as easy to move 
the stick northeast, for example, as to 
move it west. A unique feature is a 
slider on the front of the stick that acts 
as a rudder control, a fantastic addi- 
tion that comes in very handy for flight 
simulator landings. Unfortunately, 
FlightMAX has only two fire buttons, 
which keeps it from being the premier 
choice for combat flight simulations. 

Fire buttons aren't lacking on the 
Gravis Analog Pro, which sports five of 
them (two perform the same function, as 
PCs can only support four button sig- 



nals). There are three buttons on the 
stick handle, and two more on the base; 
these can be assigned to any button 
signal. The handle is padded with foam, 
making it extremely comfortable. 
Unfortunately, the handle may be a bit 
small for some adult hands — it needed 
to be about an inch taller to fit my hand 
well. There's a throttle control on the left 
side of the base, but it's easily confused 
with the button function selectors, and 
it's difficult to adjust during game action. 
You can disable the throttle if you need 
to use a second joystick, a nice touch. 
The Analog Pro has a unique ad- 
justable-tension centering feature — you 
can select how hard you have to push 
the joystick to move it off-center, or you 
can disable the centering completely. 

Gravis is about to release its next- 
generation joystick, the Phoenix Flight 
& Weapons Control System. Although 
it wasn't available for testing as this 
feature was being written, it certainly 
sounds impressive. The stick will sport 
analog and digital throttle and rudder 
control, as well as 47 different button 
function. Gravis says its configuration 
programming will make setting up the 
button functions a snap. Check this 
one one out before you make a final 
purchasing decision — not only is it 
packed with functionality, 
but it has a truly innovative 
design. It looks more like it 
belongs on the weapons 
control panel of a Klingon 
Battlecruiser than on your 
computer desk. 

The CH Products Flight- 
Stick Pro is based on the 
company's original Flight- 
Stick, long popular with dedi- 
cated flight simulation fans. 
CH Products has removed the 
annoying clicker from the 
throttle control and increased 
the number of fire buttons to 
four. There's a directional con- 
trol on the top of the stick — a 
four-position conical switch 
known to players as a "coolie 
hat" or "Madonna button." This 
switch is used in many simula- 
tions to change the view direction out of 
the aircraft. Although it's similar to the 
switch pioneered on the ThrustMaster 
FCS, it's not electrically compatible with 
that switch, so it won't work with some 
older games. However, drivers are 
available for popular games such as 
Falcon 3.0 and Microsoft Flight 
Simulator to enable the view switch. All 
four buttons and the view switch are 
mounted on the top of the stick handle, 
making for a top-heavy stick; I'd rather 
have seen some of the buttons mounted 
on the stick handle, as with the 
ThrustMaster sticks. Even so, with its 



• Paranoid population. / 
Psychotic criminals. / 

; '^Pow^r hungry corporations. 

{"Big. Brother government, ? rZ 
Haves and have nots. - 

America? * ' ■ ' ■'"■*'. *• 



I 



i 







111 .tf.'city, 

In a future only Virtual Theatre could make real. 
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r* W 



Available on 
PC CD-ROM 



Circle Rradei Service Number 146 



smooth gimballed mount, comfortable 
trigger rest, handy throttle dial, and view 
switch, this is the joystick I use most. 

If you're on a tight budget, you 
should check out the new CH Products 
Jetstick, which has only two buttons 
and no throttle but has a quality gim- 
balled mount for smooth movement, as 
well as an extremely comfortable grip. 
Another good budget alternative is 
QuickShot Warrior 5, a two-button stick 
with turbo fire that's available at a rock- 
bottom price. 

The ThrustMaster Solution 

ThrustMaster offers a high-end joy- 
stick, but that's only part of 
the company's game control 
solution. A full ThrustMaster 
setup — consisting of the Pro 
Flight Control System 
(PFCS), Mark II Weapons 
Control System (WCS), and 
Rudder Control System 
(RCS)— gives you HOTAS 
(Hands On Throttle And 
Stick) control, which lets you 
put the keyboard aside and 
immerse yourself in the virtu- 
al reality of your game. 

The PFCS is a heavy-duty 
version of the original FCS 
stick. The design is based on 
the actual control stick used in 
the Air Force's F-4 Phantom II 
jet fighter. Four buttons are 
mounted along the stick han- 
dle, making them easier to 
reach during simulated com- 
bat than those on the 
FlightStick Pro. There's also a 
view switch on the top of the 
stick. The Pro version of the 
FCS differs from the original in 
that it has a heavy metal base 
and very strong springs. It 
takes some real force to move 
the stick from side to side, just 
as in a real aircraft; this keeps 
you from overcontrolling in 
games. You should try this 
stick before buying it; if the 
force needed bothers you, you might 
want to go for the standard FCS. The 
FCS has a plastic base and is easier to 
move from side to side, but it's other- 
wise identical to the PFCS. Many play- 
ers who've tried the PFCS swear by its 
stiff, realistic response and can't go 
back to a standard joystick. The only 
real glitch with the ThrustMaster joy- 
sticks is that they don't include trim 
adjustments, relying instead on your 
software's calibration capabilities to 
adjust centering. 

The Mark II WCS is a programma- 
ble throttle control that sports five but- 
tons and a three-position rocker 
switch. The original WCS was factory 

96 COMPUTE JUNE 1994 



programmed with commands for a 
variety of flight simulations; when new 
programs came out, you had to 
replace a chip in the controller to add 
support for those. The Mark II WCS is 
fully programmable, solving that prob- 
lem. You simply download an appro- 
priate setup file from your PC for the 
simulation you're about to play. These 
setup files list keyboard commands 
that will be sent to the program when 
you press various buttons or switches. 
Setups are included for most popular 
simulations— Falcon 3.0, X-Wing, 
Comanche, and others— and new 
simulations such as F-14 Fleet 




The joy of control: The Quickshot Super Warrior. Thrustmaster 
Mark II WCS and Pro FCS. and QuickShot Warrior 5. 




Yoking around: The QuickShot AeroAce 5, CH Virtual Pilot, and 
Suncom G-Force. 



Defender are shipping with Mark II 
WCS definition files on the program 
disk. If your sim isn't supported, you 
can create your own definition files; 
you can also alter the predefined files 
if you don't like the default setup. The 
Mark II WCS also lets you reprogram 
the buttons and view control on 
ThrustMaster joysticks, allowing you to 
add support for the extra buttons and 
the coolie hat to programs without that 
functionality built-in. If your program 
supports throttle control, the Mark II 
WCS can act as a standard analog 
throttle. If not, it can operate in a digi- 
tal mode where it sends keyboard 
throttle control commands to the 



game. With the Mark II WCS, you'll 
never have to search the keyboard 
during combat again — it's a must- 
have for flight sim players. 

Dedicated sim fans will want to com- 
plete their setups with the RCS pedals. 
These sturdy aluminum-and-plastic rud- 
der pedals have a two-foot-wide spread 
and can make all the difference during 
low-speed combat and touchy landings. 
With all three controllers attached to 
make for a complete HOTAS setup, the 
experience is so realistic that you might 
not feel comfortable playing without a 
crash helmet. 

The Yoke's on You 

For some games, such as 
commercial aviation simula- 
tions or driving games, a joy- 
stick just doesn't seem like a 
natural control. For these 
you'll want to check out a 
control yoke. Like the yokes 
found in aircraft, these 
resemble steering wheels, 
but you can also push and 
pull them for vertical control. 
CH Products' sturdy Virtual 
Pilot yoke would look right at 
home on the control panel of 
a Cessna. This heavy-gauge 
plastic yoke clamps to your 
desk and sports realistic trim 
controls and a T-shaped 
throttle at the top of the main 
box. Not the most glamorous 
of the yokes examined here, 
it makes up for lack of flash 
in authentic design and qual- 
ity of construction — this yoke 
is built to last. 

A little flashier is Suncom's 
G-Force, an all-black yoke that 
looks like something you'd find 
in an ultramodern bomber or 
airliner. It's easy to find a spot 
to mount this yoke on your 
desk, as it includes both suc- 
tion cups and clamps. The 
throttle isn't as nice as the one 
on the Virtual Pilot — it's a slider 
on the front of the control wheel — but the 
wheel itself is a bit more comfortable to 
use, especially in applications where 
you'll be pressing the fire buttons a lot. 
Also, there's a directional lock on the 
column that will keep you from being 
able to move it forward or backward, for 
use in driving games. 

QuickShot's AeroAce 5 is definitely 
the most visually interesting of the 
yoke controllers — it looks like it's 
straight out of Star Wars. It's the only 
yoke here that features a turbo fire 
feature on the fire buttons. It has a 
gimmicky, but sort of neat, artificial 
horizon on the front of the yoke that's 
marginally useful for figuring out when 



'>ii^JuJ&:, 



■-. • • - . ■-.- ■■;■• ■ '. ■:'«;,- 






ARE UFOs REAL OR 
FICTITIOUS? NOW YOU CAN 
DECIDE FOR YOURSELF. 

In 1969, after a 16-year Air Force* 
UFOs, the government put an end to what was 
cajled, "Project Blue Book." Why? Are UFOs just 
a figment of impressionable minds? Or are they, 
in fact, very real? Does data exist to substafrffete' ' 
the existence of extraterrestrial UFOs? And, has 
there been an extensive government cover-up of 
UFOs? 

Now, OMNI Magazine takes a hard look at the 
leading stories of alleged cover-ups over the past 
half century. The April 1994 issue, devoted to the 
subject of UFOs, kicks off an ongoing series. In 
uniquely OMNI fashion, this unresolved topic is 
now opened to the hard light of rational scientific 
and journalistic inquiry. 

You can't afford' to miss it Subscribe now and get 
the special April UFO issue of OMNI as a bonus. 



Mi 50 YEARS OF CLOSE ENCOUNTERS 

iJtT| I|l 

THEUFOCONSPII 



RUSSIAN 
SECRET SAUCER . 
RESEARCH 



BREAKING 
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Visa or MasterCard holders call toll free: 1-800-289-6664 
Or send postcard with your name and address tof OMNI, P.O. Box 3026, Harlar 




Come over to my pad: The QuickShot Star- 
Fighter 5, Gravis PC GamePad, and 
Suncom Command Control. 

you've centered the controls. There's 
no throttle control at all, and no 
clamps — you're forced to use suction 
cups, which may not work well on 
your computer desk. Not as comfort- 
able to use as the Suncom and CH 
Products offerings, the AeroAce 5 will 
appeal primarily to kids who think it 
looks really cool. 

Finally, really serious driving afi- 
cionados will want to check out 
ThrustMaster's Formula T1 control. 
Constructed of aluminum and heavy- 
gauge ABS plastic, this realistic con- 
troller includes a full-size steering 
wheel and shift lever, along with floor- 
mounted brake and gas pedals. 





PRODUCTS 


Advanced Gravis 


Logitech 


1790 Midway Ln. 


6505 Kaiser Dr. 


Bellingham, WA 98226 


Fremont, CA 94555 


(604)431-5020 


(510)795-8500 


Colorado Spectrum 


QuickShot 


748 Whaler's Way 


47473 Seabridge Dr. 


Bldg. 3, #201 


Fremont, CA 94538 


Fort Collins, CO 80525 


(510)490-7968 


(303)225-1687 






Suncom 


CH Products 


6400 W. Gross Point Rd. 


970 Park Center Rd. 


Niles, IL 60714 


Vista, CA 92083 


(708) 647-4040 


(619)598-2518 






ThrustMaster 


Genovation 


10150 SW Nimbus Ave. 


17741 Mitchell N. 


Portland, OR 97223-4337 


Irvine, CA 92714 


(503) 639-3200 


(714)833-0322 





Come Up to My Pad 

If you've spent much time on video 
game consoles such as the Genesis or 
CD32, you may have gotten accus- 
tomed to joy pad controllers. These are 
now available for the PC as well. 
Although they're not well suited to simu- 
lations and driving games, they're the 
controllers of choice for fast-action 




arcade games where your hands can 
quickly tire when using a full-sized stick. 
QuickShot's StarFighter 5 is a good 
basic controller, with a turbo fire feature 
and two fire buttons. Suncom's Com- 
mand Control pad is similar, but includes 
five buttons: Two are standard fire but- 
tons, one acts as if you were pressing 
both primary buttons together, and two 
are turbo fire buttons. The premium 
choice is the Gravis PC GamePad, 
which includes four fire buttons, single- 
shot or turbo fire, and a small handle 
which screws into the game pad and 
turns it into a tiny joystick. Lefties take 
note: The PC GamePad can be switched 
for left- or right-handed operation. 

Input Alternatives 

In a category by itself is Logitech's new 
CyberMan, a six-axis controller that can 
not only be moved forward, backward, 
left, and right, but can also be twisted 
to the side or moved up and down, giv- 
ing you full movement in three-dimen- 
sional space. It connects to a serial port 
and can work with or replace a mouse 
(it doesn't work very well as a mouse, 
though). My favorite feature is feed- 
back—the game can cause the Cyber- 
Man to vibrate in response to your 
actions. Few games support CyberMan 
now, but that should change soon. 

Take Off, Eh? 

As you can see, there are tons of 
options available to the PC gamer. 
Your choices will depend on the 
games you're playing, as well as on 
personal preferences. But be sure to 
check your applications to see 
whether they support esoterica such 
as extra buttons, throttles, or rudder 
pedals before spending hundreds of 
dollars on these extras. □ 



98 COMPUTE JUNE 1994 



I>* IV. 



IS WITH TH EIM. 



MYTH. 





Now you can experience 

Star Wars from a new 

point-of-view. From the 

creators of X-Wing . 

comes TIE Fighter , Aj 

the sequel that lets you 

fly for the Empire. 

The dark side of the 

Force beckons.. .dare you respond? 






'fltttTWei 



v> 



Rip through the Rebel front in six 
unique Imperial starfighters. 




New heart-stopping, 

interconnected battles 

will envelop yon. 




Enhanced ultra-realistic 3D 
graphics and gameplay. 



Coming sodn for IBM PC and compatibles. At your 





Li 



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You're in for the adventure of your life 

Dragon's Lair is back and 1 better than ever on CD-ROM! 

This full arcade version is packed with spectacular 
animation and digitized 1 sound, bringing Dragon's Lair 
to life like never before! 

You control the actions of Dirk the Daring, a valiant 
knight, on a quest to rescue the fair Princess from the 
clutches of an evil dragon. Fight your way through the 
castle of the dark wizard who has enchanted it with 
treacherous monsters and obstacles. 

Lead on brave adventurer... your quest awaits! 




SUA 



Keel Magic 



SEGA CD 



also available Jo 
IBM PC & Macintosi 

Circle Reader Service Number 12: 



ReadySoft Incorporated 

SnWprthfiim Court Suite? 



REVIEWS 



MEGAHERTZ 
XJ1144 

Modems keep getting small- 
er, but none are as small as 
the PCMCIA modem cards 
that fit into many notebook, 
subnotebook, and palmtop 
computers — not to mention 
the new PDAs (Personal Dig- 
ital Assistants). These days, 
almost every notebook com- 
puter comes with one or 
more PCMCIA slots, so buy- 
ing a PCMCIA modem 
means you should be able 
to use it later if you switch to 
another notebook computer. 
(The PCMCIA standard isn't 
100-percent solid, so ask 
about compatibility before 
you buy.) 

Megahertz is currently the 
leader in PCMCIA modems. 
The reasons for the compa- 
ny's success are threefold: 
five-year warranties, toll- 
free support, and patented 
XJACK technology. Other PC- 
MCIA modems make you 
use a special cable, which 
connects to the modem on 
one end and a standard 
phone cable on the other 
end. With the XJACK, you 
simply press the side of the 
card, and a sturdy phone 
jack connector pops out, al- 
lowing you to plug a phone 
cable directly into the mo- 
dem. When finished, you 
press the XJACK back into 
the card, where it stays until 
it's needed again. 

For this review I tested 
the XJ1144 fax/data mo- 
dem, which includes an 
XJACK. (The CC3144, 
which does not include an 
XJACK, is available for $30 
less.) It handles both data 
and fax transmissions at 
14,400 bps (bits per sec- 
ond), supports V.42 and 
V.42bis for 57,600-bps data 
throughput, and works with 
notebook computers from 
AST, Dell, Sharp, Toshiba, 




The Megahertz XJ1144's patented XJACK phone connector makes 
it one of the most portable modem solutions available. 



Corel Venlura GtMMSHOWI.CHP (MMOONfl. 
[He Liiii \Vw Chapter Fcamc paragraph Icxt Graphic Tyhlc Extensions Uefp 






-} — '-- 







mxH.M?H 



Corel Ventura 4.2 is only an incremental update, but Corel has 
stuffed the package full of accessory fonts and utilities. 



and others. (Call 800-LAP- 
TOPS, extension 6789, for 
an up-to-date list.) The unit 
ships with the DOS-based 
communications program 
WordPerfect Communica- 
tions, the DOS-based fax pro- 
gram WordPerfect Express- 
Fax, and the Windows-based 



fax program Eclipse Fax SE 
(a full-featured, though 
slimmed-down, version of the 
powerful Eclipse Fax). 

The XJ1144 worked 
flawlessly in my HP Om- 
niBook 300, though to opti- 
mize the battery life, I took 
the modem out when I 



wasn't using it. The card 
draws 725 mW when operat- 
ing, but that drops to 275 
mW in standby mode and 
77 mW in sleep mode — all 
of which are higher than 
with some competing PC- 
MCIA fax/data modems. 

Overall, I found the 
XJ1144 to be a well-built 
and reliable modem that 
should last for many years. 
Add the convenience of the 
XJACK and the outstanding 
five-year warranty, and I 
would recommend it to any- 
one looking for a PCMCIA 
fax/data modem. 

DAVID ENGLISH 

Megahertz 
(800) LAPTOPS 
$359 

Circle Reader Service Number 434 

COREL VENTURA 
4.2 

Corel Ventura 4.2 is the first 
release of that desktop pub- 
lishing program since Corel 
acquired the stagnating Ven- 
tura Publisher software last 
year. The updated package 
includes not only a new ver- 
sion of the program but also 
hundreds of megabytes of 
the kinds of goodies we've 
come to expect with Corel 
products. 

Because this is an interim 
update (consisting mostly of 
bug fixes), Corel Ventura 
breaks no new desktop pub- 
lishing ground. Still, it's a wor- 
thy choice when you're pub- 
lishing long documents like 
books and magazines. 
Those not convinced to 
choose Ventura over the 
more expensive PageMaker 
or QuarkXPress simply be- 
cause of the program's im- 
provements may instead be 
lured by Corel's impressive 
bundle of extras. 

These include many of 
the same riches that made 
CorelDRAW! such a hit. The 

JUNE 1994 COMPUTE 101 



REVIEWS 



$199 CD-ROM version con- 
tains more than 600 fonts in 
both Adobe Type 1 and True- 
Type formats; over 10,000 
pieces of EPS clip art; and a 
CD-ROM sampler with 100 
photos culled from Corel's 
Photo CD collection. Those 
items alone make for a tempt- 
ing package; the bonus is 
Ventura. 

Of all Ventura's merits, 
three stand out. First is Ventu- 
ra Scan, which easily ac- 
quires images from any scan- 
ner and brings them directly 
into a document. Next, Ven- 
tura Separator performs 
prepress color corrections 
and separations for both 
spot and process colors— 
an important capability for 
professional publishing. Final- 
ly, Corel has incorporated 
support for Adobe Acrobat 
(a set of applications de- 
signed to simplify document 
exchange and output) and in- 
cludes Acrobat Reader and 
Adobe Type Manager 2.6. A 
document modified using Ac- 
robat may be viewed on any 
platform, regardless of its na- 
tive operating system, and 
printed on any printer. Note, 
however, that while Corel 
Ventura includes direct sup- 
port for Acrobat features 
such as bookmarks, links, 
and tags, and it includes Ac- 
robat Reader, it doesn't in- 
clude the Acrobat Distiller 
program necessary for actu- 
ally creating portable docu- 
ment files. 

If you're formatting informa- 
tion from database software, 
you'll appreciate the includ- 
ed Database Publisher, 
which extracts information 
from existing database files 
and converts them for use 
in Ventura. Finally, a design 
gallery features 75 style 
sheets and templates to 
help you get started in 
page layout. 

There's really only one ma- 
jor flaw with this package: 




Ventura is still tougher to 
learn and use than its compe- 
titors, despite Corel's inclu- 
sion of good training and ref- 
erence materials. Current 
Ventura Publisher users 
should definitely spring for 
the upgrade, which features 
an abundance of add-ons 
and some useful software up- 



Falling squarely into the 
edutainment category, 3-D 
Dinosaur Adventure packs a 
wealth of dino media onto a 
single CD. With its virtual- 
reality dinosaur-theme-park 
setting, 3-D Dinosaur Adven- 
ture opens doors to the Tri- 
assic, Jurassic, and Creta- 
ceous Periods and offers 









iPlffl/lblOlTt 



The Tyrannosaurus rex Is frightening enough in two dimensions- 
wait until you see the 3-D animated version. 



dates. Others may want to 
sit tight, as CorelDRAW! 5.0 
is due in May, and it will in- 
corporate Ventura as part of 
the application suite. 

RICK BROIDA 

Corel 

(613) 728-8200 

$249 (disk) 

$129 (disk upgrade) 

$199 (CD-ROM) 

$99 (CD-ROM upgrade) 

Circle Reader Service Number 435 

3-D DINOSAUR 
ADVENTURE 

Talk about a comeback! Af- 
ter 65 million years of extinc- 
tion, dinosaurs are again in 
the limelight, touring the mul- 
timedia circuit and starring 
in Knowledge Adventure's 
terrific multimedia program, 
3-D Dinosaur Adventure. 



numerous dino activities in 
each. 

The meat of the disc is 
the Dinosaur Reference ar- 
ea, an interactive encyclope- 
dia covering 150 million 
years of paleontology. Visi- 
tors can access different 
time periods by clicking on 
either a globe or a time line, 
or by letting the narrator 
read his way from subject to 
subject. Colorful, detailed il- 
lustrations accompany 
each passage. 

For younger users, 
there's the Dinosaur Story- 
book, a short but nicely illus- 
trated history of the giant crit- 
ters. Like the encyclopedia, 
the Storybook is read aloud. 
A simple click of the mouse 
flips pages. 

A major attraction is the 
movie theater, which fea- 
tures 30 "live action" films. 



These vary in length and sub- 
ject, but all are entertaining. 
Some are humorous, a few 
even moving, and most will 
leave you wondering, 
"How'd they do that?" 

Still more activities fill the 
park: an eye-popping 3-D di- 
nosaur museum (two pairs 
of 3-D glasses are includ- 
ed), a couple of well-done di- 
nosaur quiz games, the 
amusing Create-A-Saurus 
(design the world's first 
wood-paneled velocirap- 
tor!), and a strange virtual- 
reality game called Save the 
Dinosaurs. 

Overall, 3-D Dinosaur Ad- 
venture is a superb pack- 
age. Wonderfully rancorous 
sound effects abound, and 
the software is a snap to op- 
erate. It's the perfect diver- 
sion for kids of all ages. 

RICK BROIDA 



Knowledge Adventure 

(818)542-4200 

$79.95 

Circle Reader Service Number 436 



ARCH0N ULTRA 

This is the most enjoyable re- 
view I've done in a long 
time— not only because 
Archon Ultra is great but al- 
so because it gave me an ex- 
cuse to drag my dust-cov- 
ered Commodore 64 out of 
the closet and boot up my 
ten-year-old copy of the orig- 
inal Archon. (This brought 
back a flood of happy mem- 
ories, and it made me won- 
der how I ever managed to 
wait for games to load from 
floppy disks.) 

In case you don't remem- 
ber Archon, it's an action/ 
strategy game that plays 
like a combination of chess 
and gladiatorial combat. 
The pieces of the Light Side 
and the Dark Side face off 
on the Archon board, which 
looks somewhat like a chess- 
board, but with a few big dif- 



102 



COMPUTE JUNE 1994 



Just looking at Myst 
is an adventure 

(Imagine what playing it must be like) 



Now Available 
MPC 



Only you can 
untangle the wen 
or lies ana deceit that 
shrouds the 5 worlds or 
Myst. So stop imagining. 
And live the adventure 
that tens or thousands or 
Macintosh™ users have 
already experienced. 



♦Available on Macintosh 
and MPC CD-ROM — 

♦ 5 complete worlds 
to explore 

♦ No inventory or time 
constraints 

♦ Over 2,500 
photorealistic images 

♦ Non-linear game play 

♦ Original soundtrack 

♦ QuickTime™ video 
and animation 



To order , see your local dealer 

or call 800/521-6263 

ana refer to code 354. 




Broderbund 



CYAN" 



1 



w 



Myst is a trademark of Cyan, Inc All rights reserved. Macintosh and QuickTime™ are registered 
trademarks of Apple Computer, inc MPC is a registered trademark of the Multimedia PC 
Marketing Council. © Copyright 1994, Broderbund Software, Inc. and Cyan, Inc 
Circle Reader Service Number 192 



REVEWS 



ferences: It's 9x9 squares 
instead of 8 x 8, there are 
five special Power Point 
squares, and some of the 
squares cycle from dark to 
light and back again. 
Square colors are extremely 
important, because a light 
piece fighting on a light 
square is much stronger 
than a light piece fighting on 
a dark square, and vice ver- 
sa. To win the game, you 
must destroy all of the other 
side's pieces or conquer the 
five Power Points. 

Whenever opposing piec- 
es move onto the same 
square, they engage in real- 
time combat on one of three 
different battlefields (the dark- 
er the square, the gloomier 
the field). Each of the 16 dif- 
ferent pieces in the game 
has two powers to use dur- 
ing combat, as opposed to 
only one in the original 
Archon. The Light Side's 
Phoenix, for example, can ex- 
plode into a fireball and 
shoot feathers that act as 
homing missiles, while the 
Dark Side's Dragon 
breathes fire as well as poi- 
sonous gas clouds. Learn- 
ing how to exploit the 
strengths and weaknesses 
of the different pieces is 
what makes Archon Ultra so 
darned entertaining. 

While Archon Ultra natural- 
ly has a one-player mode, 
the computer opponent isn't 
too bright, and it's not much 
fun playing such a predicta- 
ble opponent. Archon Ultra 
truly shines in the two-player 
mode. And unlike the origi- 
nal, Archon Ultra allows you 
to play human opponents 
by modem. 

Archon Ultra's graphics 
and animation are topnotch, 
but the sound support is an- 
noyingly lacking. Only three 
cards are supported: 
Sound Blaster, Sound Blas- 
ter Pro, and Gravis Ultra- 
sound. If your board 

104 COMPUTE JUNE 1994 



doesn't have Sound Blaster 
emulation, you're out of 
luck, and even if it does, 
there's no guarantee it will 
work properly. Pray with me 
that SSI will take steps to sup- 
port more boards in future re- 
visions of the game. 

Put simply, Archon Ultra 
is one of the best action/strat- 



gracefully between the 
worlds of 24-bit painting and 
technical illustration. It auto- 
matically converts bitmapped 
art into structured curves, 
and it allows you to paint on 
object-oriented drawings 
with full-color bitmaps. 

You don't have to love Can- 
vas just for its looks — the pro- 




Plan your strategies on Archon Ultra's 3-D chesslike board — then 
fight it out on a chaotic battlefield. 



egy games you'll ever play. 
It manages to capture all of 
the payability of the original 
Archon, while adding 
enough new gameplay fea- 
tures to hold the attention of 
1990s gamers. 

ZACH MESTON 

Strategic Simulations 

(408) 737-6800 

$59.95 

Circle Reader Service Number 437 

CANVAS 3.51 

When using your PC to cre- 
ate an illustration, you gener- 
ally have to decide whether 
to draw with dots, using a 
bitmapped paint program, or 
with lines, using a structured 
drawing program; you're rare- 
ly given the option to do 
both. Not so with Deneba's 
Canvas 3.51, though, which 
combines both drawing 
styles in a powerful, flexible, 
and useful manner. 

Canvas lets you move 



gram is literate as well. In ad- 
dition to its art features, Can- 
vas is a capable midrange 
desktop publishing and type- 
setting solution. You'll find 
spell-checking, leading, frac- 
tional kerning, scaling, and en- 
velope-printing features. You 
can create multiple text col- 
umns, and Canvas will wrap 
text around objects and 
along curves. It's not a fully 
capable word processor, 
missing formatting options 
like hyphens, but it's a better 
text layout solution than 
some dedicated publishing 
packages. 

Canvas is built around a 
core of powerful structured 
drawing primitives such as 
lines, Bezier curves, rectan- 
gles, and circles. The object 
tools make it easy to work 
on sections of complicated 
drawings: You can lock or 
hide objects, and you can 
work with an unlimited num- 
ber of object layers. 

In addition to the basic 



tools, external tools like 
stars, spirals, custom gradi- 
ent fills, concentric circles, 
and fractals help the artisti- 
cally challenged create bet- 
ter-looking drawings. Each 
of these tools is a separate 
module and can be in- 
stalled or unloaded to let 
you configure the system to 
fit your needs. Most illustra- 
tion programs need copious 
amounts of memory — often 
at least 8MB. But by install- 
ing only the tools you need, 
you can actually run Canvas 
in only 2MB (4MB is recom- 
mended, though). 

You can manipulate ob- 
jects using a host of effects 
such as stretching, distor- 
tion, rotation, and flipping. 
The extrude tool can turn a 
2-D object into a 3-D 
shape. The perspective tool 
does limited 3-D tricks, by 
making objects appear to 
push into the foreground or 
recede into space. 

You can assign dynamical- 
ly linked Smart Lines to the 
objects. These allow you to 
move some objects in a draw- 
ing while leaving others in 
place. The Smart Lines be- 
tween the objects will stretch 
and redraw to fit. This is 
great for flow charts, organiz- 
ational charts, and circuit di- 
agrams. Mechanical artists 
and architects will appreciate 
the automatic dimensioning 
tools, which help find meas- 
urements and determine the 
scaling of objects. 

Rounding out the pack- 
age are a number of special 
features like macros, OLE 
and network support, highly 
customizable preferences, 
and the ability to create 
slide-show presentations. 

The essential test of any il- 
lustration program is getting 
the art out to the real world. 
In addition to printing files 
on PostScript- or Windows- 
supported printers, Canvas 
can create color separa- 



A M T E X 





This is what pinball was in the days of the classics. A flipper, a 
ball, and a few elusive targets. But don't be fooled by simplicity. 
This isn't a "luck of the draw" card game. When you have to 
shoot for the high hand, skill and strategy are the rule. Hit the 
cards out of order, and you're back where you started. It's a 
challenge that made Royal Flush one of Gottlieb's most popular 
drop target games. Now AMTEX takes you back to the old 
pinball arcade with the authentic sights, sounds and flipper 
sensation of the original. Learn to maneuver the ball through 
the open playing field for the ultimate score — 
"The White Joker". Odds are, you can bet on 
Royal Flush to keep you challenged. But 
don't gamble when it comes to 
computer pinball. Choose the 
proven winner. AMTEX. 



Gottlieb 

Pinball Bv ®ramtar' 




Distributed By 

Broderbund* 




Coming soon at a suggested retail price of $49.95 
Circle Reader Service Number 162 



You can't get any closer than this ! 






REVIEWS 



tions using a variety of color- 
mixing options. It can load 
and save files in EPS, BMP, 
PCX, TIF, WMF, and a host 
of other bitmapped and struc- 
tured formats. Conspicuous 
by their absence are filters 
for word processor docu- 
ments — Canvas lacks any 
sort of text import feature, a 
surprising omission consider- 
ing its sophisticated layout 
capabilities. To bring in 
text, you must cut and 
paste through the Clipboard 
or type it in manually. 

Canvas costs about half 
as much as its competitors in 
the illustration field, and it of- 
fers an unbelievable $99.95 
competitive upgrade price. 
This puts its power easily with- 
in the range of artists looking 
to broaden their range and 
output. It doesn't have all the 
features or the incredible pot- 
pourri of accessories of com- 
petitors such as Co- 
relDRAW!, but it offers more 
than the basics in both the 
drawing and painting areas, 
and it does an outstanding 
job of blending those capabili- 
ties. Canvas should satisfy 
the needs of many PC artists 
who are ready for a greater 
level of professional punch 
without the punch of the pro- 
fessional price. 

DANIEL GREENBERG 

Deneba 

(305) 596-5644 

$399.95 

$99.95 (competitive upgrade) 

Circle Reader Service Number 438 

FONTMINDER 2.0 

Keeping track of large num- 
bers of TrueType and Type 
1 fonts with Windows' Con- 
trol Panel and Adobe Type 
Manager is definitely more 
complicated than it should 
be. That is, unless you own 
FontMinder from ARES. 

This simple utility, now in 
its second version, enables 
you to load, unload, move, 

106 COMPUTE JUNE 1994 



copy, delete, rename, and 
sample all your TrueType 
and Type 1 fonts with a sin- 
gle font manager. Loading 
fonts is simply a matter of 
dragging an icon from one 
window to another. Unload- 
ing them is just as easy. If 
you have ATM 2.5 or higher, 
you won't have to restart Win- 

Elle Library PostScript Help 



downloading of those fonts 
from the computer, saving 
time and printer memory. 

If you have large font librar- 
ies on removable media, 
such as CD-ROMs or 
SyQuest disks, FontMinder 
enables you to sample fonts 
onscreen and in print before 
you install them, again sav- 



txyy 286 lontt 



■QD Aachen 

GDACulon Regular 

QD AGaianond 

Q] Algerian 

HO Anericana 

QD Aowlcana ExBM 

. Tl AnaricanTjFpewiitoi 

fXI AawrTypawiilor Cond 



ImUl Fooli: 63 



m 



M«k* Fool Pack 




C oppetplato T hrrty neAB 

IV Copporplete-ThirtyThreoBC 

IV Copperpiate-TwanlyNinaAB 

"~ Futwa Fantfy 

€3 Gaianond Fan)* 

G3 Hekelica Faafc 

Cj Haivatica Fiactiom 



& 



Ifpa S—plit 



Windows Ik ATM Basics 
ACai Ion Ragubv 
Afiaramond 



%< BerthoM Bodoni 

If Barthold Bodoni Bold 

It Barthold Bodoni IteBc 

1JT Barthold Bodoni Bold Itafc 



IB 



NewCenturyScMbk 
1% NawContuiySchtbk-Honu 
IV NertContuySehlbk-Bold 
F, NawCentwyScMbfc-ftalic 
P, NowCefttwySehfck-Boldtali 



a 



FontMinder 2.0 makes keeping track of large numbers of TrueType 
and Adobe Type 1 fonts a much simpler task. 



dows for font changes to 
take effect. FontMinder 
doesn't replace ATM or the 
Windows font utility, but 
you'll rarely have to use ei- 
ther of them directly, since 
FontMinder uses both. 

The program maintains its 
own master library of fonts ar- 
ranged into families. You 
can install whole families, in- 
dividual faces, or custom 
font packs you create to 
quickly load groups of 
fonts. Packs contain only ref- 
erences to fonts rather than 
the fonts themselves, and 
they're exportable. Service 
bureaus that use FontMin- 
der can use your font packs 
to ensure the right fonts are 
loaded for your job. 

When used with Post- 
Script printers, FontMinder 
automatically edits the Win- 
dows initiator for download- 
ing Type 1 fonts. It also de- 
termines printer-resident Post- 
Script fonts and prevents 



ing you time when looking 
for just the right font. 

FontMinder manages up 
to 4000 fonts. You may not 
have that many, but you 
probably have more on 
your system than you think — 
having a few hundred fonts 
isn't uncommon. The font 
management you can per- 
form with FontMinder will 
speed up your system, free 
resources, and shorten 
those endless font menus. 

PHILLIP MORGAN 

ARES 

(415)578-9090 

$79.95 

Circle Reader Service Number 439 

BRAM STOKER'S 
DRACULA 

Ten years ago, my eyes 
would bug out if I bought a 
game and there was actual- 
ly more than one disk 
(wow!) inside the box. Now- 



adays, my eyes bug out if I 
get a game with (d'oh!) only 
one disk inside the box. 
Such is the case with Bram 
Stoker's Dracula, a medio- 
cre movie tie-in. 

Your goal in this arcadish 
Dracula is to take out the 
chief bloodsucker by wander- 
ing around three locations 
(a cemetery, Carfax Abbey, 
and Dracula's castle) and 
throwing holy wafers into 
glowing red coffins (huh?). 
While you're wandering 
around, the hideous crea- 
tures attacking you must be 
destroyed with your handy 
pistol or knife. There are al- 
so locked doors that need 
to be unlocked with specific 
keys, usually near coffins. 
And that's about it. 

The game's first flaw is 
the lack of an automapping 
system or compass to help 
you get your bearings. The 
manual brags about the 
game's "three huge levels," 
but what good are they 
when you're stuck stumbling 
around the first level be- 
cause every location looks 
the same? 

The other flaw is that the 
gameplay is dull. Walk 
around, find a key, shoot a 
zombie, and walk around 
some more. No neat puz- 
zles, no variety of weap- 
ons—just boredom . . . and 
frustration at how easily Drac- 
ula's minions can kill you. 

I could put a stake 
through the heart of Bram 
Stoker's Dracula, but I'll re- 
sist the temptation and sim- 
ply say that this Dracula isn't 
much fun. The designers 
managed to imitate the look 
of Wolfenstein 3-D, but they 
forgot to add the gameplay 
and the excitement. 

ZACH MESTON 



Psygnosis 
(617) 497-7794 
$59.95 

Circle Reader Service Number 440 



FROM THE CREATORS OF THE AWARD-WINNING WOLFENSTEIN 3-D' 




Z*j IS mw 
n m 




WANT TO BE A HERO? 
GO TO HELL! 

DOOM is a lightning-fast virtual reality adventure where i 
you're the toughest space trooper ever to suck vacuum. 
Scientists stationed on a far-off moonbase have opened 1 
a gateway to Hell, releasing a monster-infested holocaust V 
upon the universe. You're the last marine remaining on 1 

the base after the invasion. Your mission is to survive! V 

• Four-player combat over network 

• Two-player action over modem .. 
Incredibly detailed 3-D world 
Blood-curdling stereo sound effects 
Hair raising demonic denizens of Hell 

• Awesome foe-fraggin' weapons 



"The graphics are superb, with 
lighting effects and art that could 
only come from dark and 
demented minds." 
Computer Gaming World 



"You want action? You want 
gunplay? You want gore? 
...DOOM has it all." 
PC Entertainment 



"...if you have saliva, prepare to 
drool now."". ..an absolute must- 
have for PC action fans." 
Electronic Games 





Call 1-800-IDG 



I 



SOFTWARE 



Order the entire DOOM trilogy for $40.00 
or get episode one, Knee-Deep in the 
Dead™ for the cost of shipping and 
handling. Or download episode one 
from Software Creations™ BBS. 
(508) 368-4137 @ 2400-14.4K baud 
Canadian customers call 1-800-661-7383. 



Requires a 386DX PC compatible or better; hard disk drive; VGA graphics; 4 Megabytes of memory. A 486 is 

recommended. Multiplayer options require a network which uses the IPX protocol, a modem, or serial link. Digitized 

sound effects require a 100% Sound Blaster™ compatible card, Gravis Ultra Sound™, or Pro Audio Spectrum™- 16. 

DOOM is a trademark of id Software, ©1993. Other trademarks are the property of their respective companies. 



Circle Reader Service Number 104 



]MMU 



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JCD1 07 DUNGEON OF DOMINANCE (PC) 

MEET MISTRESS JACQUELINE & FRIENDS $69.95 

JCD9911 ADULT MOVIE ALMANAC* (PC/MAC) 

DEFINITIVE GUIDE TO EROTIC ENTERTAINMENT .$89.95 

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PLEASE SPECIFY PC 3 OR MAC 3 
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A SEXY VARIETY, WITH PRINT OPTION $89.95 

QCD800 J. STEPHENS HICKS # I (PC/MAC) 

100 PROFESSIONAL PHOTOS OF SEXY WOMEN $29.95 

JCD8003 AMERICAN GIRLS*(TOPLESS) (PC/MAC) 
250 PHOTOS OF AMERICA'S SEXIEST WOMEN ..$29,95 
QCD9002 ADULT PALATE VOL I (XX) (PC/jrfAC) 

100+ HIGH-RES. HARD CORE ADULT MOWS STiLS.$29.95 

JCD9003 ADULT PALATE VOL IUXXXPCMaC) 

100+ HIGH-RES. HARO CORE ADULT MOVE STILLS.$29.95 

JCD8002 HIGH VOLUME NUDES (PC/MAC) 
HJGH-RES. HIGH VOLUME $29.95 



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reviews 

DRACULA 
UNLEASHED 

Viacom's Dracula Un- 
leashed proves as irresisti- 
ble as the call of the un- 
dead prince himself. This 
CD-ROM adaptation of the 
gothic horror story draws 
you in quickly, and like eve- 
ry hapless and unwitting he- 
ro caught in the web of the 
nosferatu (vampire), you 
prove to be pivotal in stop- 
ping the evil count. 

The hero you control is in- 
vestigating the death of his 
brother. He comes to Lon- 
don only to learn that his 
brother was killed while at- 
tacking Dracula ten years 
earlier. Along with Jonathan 
Harker and Professor Van 
Helsing, he was rescuing Mi- 
na Harker from the clutches 
of the undead. The grisly 
murders around London 
show that the count has 
somehow come back, and 
it's up to you and your 

108 COMPUTE JUNE 1994 



friends to stop him again. 
You move around London, 
accumulating objects and 
watching the story unfold. 
The interface is pure point- 
and-click: Click on the 
horse carriage to travel, 
click on the front door to en- 
ter a location, and so on. In- 
teraction exists only in select- 
ing which video sequence 
you'll be shown next. 

Though the game isn't 
too difficult, Dracula Un- 
leashed can sometimes be 
frustrating because of its 
structure. Events are careful- 
ly scripted, and you're sad- 
dled with a time limit — you 
have only five days to piece 
together the goings-on and 
kill Dracula. More important, 
you must often make sure 
that a certain object is in 
your hand before you enter 
a scene to elicit the proper 
response from other charac- 
ters. Don't go off to kill the 
vampire without your stake 
and mallet in hand! Be- 
cause the plot progression 
requires that you do the 
right things in the right or- 



der, saving games often is 
an absolute necessity. Each 
day will end in a grisly and 
permanent fashion if you fail 
to perform a necessary 
task, and you may find your- 
self backtracking through 
your old saved games to 
find out what you've 
missed. Pay attention to all 
the dialogue, since it con- 
tains clues about what you 
need to do. For example, if 
by the end of the first day, a 
woman that has turned into 
a vampire has killed you, 
you know that you must 
somehow prevent her from 
becoming a vampire during 
that day. 

Dracula Unleashed 

boasts 96 minutes of full-mo- 
tion video, which occupies a 
good percentage of your 
VGA or SVGA display. Vid- 
eo was smooth on my dou- 
ble-speed CD-ROM drive, 
but owners of older single- 
speed drives should have 
no problem, either. You'll 
need 4MB of RAM and a 20- 
MHz 386SX or better to play 
the game, and a sound 



card is virtually a must. The 
soundtrack is moody and om- 
inous, and I'm happy to re- 
port that the actors, while no 
competition for Daniel Day- 
Lewis or Meryl Streep, are 
adequate and often likable. 
The production values never 
falter, and they actually re- 
mind me of a solid PBS per- 
formance. The scenes are 
enjoyable to watch. A bit of 
warning, though: Some 
scenes are positively gory, 
with dripping blood, 
severed heads, and other 
typical vampire fare. 

A marked improvement 
over ICOM's initial multime- 
dia releases (the Sherlock 
Holmes games), Dracula Un- 
leashed gives you a chance 
to rewrite the Bram Stoker 
tale using well-implemented 
technology that would have 
seemed quite magical even 
to Dracula himself. 

BERNARD YEE 

Viacom New Media 

(708) 520-4440 

$69.95 

Circle Reader Service Number 441 



BRING YOUR 

FAVORITE GAMES TO LIFE 

ON THE BIG SCREEN! 





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GAME ZAPPER converts 
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So plug in GAME ZAPPER — 
your favorite games will he 
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ig room into a virtual reality 

' - / 


lecommrnaea Joi . uppUrattons only 





Circle Reader Service Number 199 
DS ADVANCED DIGITAL SYSTEMS 20204 State Rd. Cerritos, CA 90701 (310)865-1432 (310)809-6144 (Fax) (800)888-5244 

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REVEWS 



SIMFARM 



Maxis bills SimFarm as SimCi- 
ty's country cousin, and 
there's an obvious family re- 
semblance. SimFarm has col- 
orful overhead-perspective 
graphics, mouse-operated 
tools for hands-on fun, and 
lots of information screens 
for feedback. It does not, 
however, quite live up to the 
reputation of its illustrious rel- 
ative. As carefully crafted 
and engaging as it might 
be, SimFarm lacks some of 
the magic that made SimCi- 
ty an instant hit. 

In SimFarm, you start out 
with a plot of land and 
some cash. You can buy a 
variety of farm tools, such 
as tractors, planters, spray- 
ers, and harvesters; struc- 
tures like barns, silos, 
sheds, and water towers; 
and livestock such as pigs, 
sheep, cows, and horses. 
The real action, however, is 
in planting, tending, and sell- 
ing cash crops. There are 
24 different kinds of crops 
that you can raise, from mun- 
dane grains like wheat and 
oats to vegetable crops like 
lettuce, tomatoes, and on- 
ions. You can also plant ap- 
ple and orange trees, or 
even flowers. You decide 
what to plant based on 
weather conditions, hardi- 
ness of the crop, and mar- 
ket prices. 

Once the seed is planted, 
you must make sure the 
crop gets the right amount of 
water (by building irrigation 
and drainage ditches), and 
you must spray periodically 
to combat weeds, insects, 
and fungus blight. If the 
weather cooperates and you 
bring in a good harvest, you 
can sell it immediately or 
store it until the price is right. 
The sophisticated farmer can 
even buy futures to lock in 
the price before the harvest, 
Of course, there may not be 

110 COMPUTE JUNE 1994 



a harvest at all, thanks to dis- 
asters such as locusts, 
drought, flooding, frost, and 
windstorms. If your crop is 
wiped out, you may find your- 
self going to the bank to 
scrape up enough capital to 
try again. That adds interest 
payments to the list of poten- 
tial calamities. 



PHARMASSIST 

Here's a health question to 
ponder: Your doctor pre- 
scribes the drug Tagamet to 
treat your peptic ulcer. Are 
there any side effects or 
drug interactions? What hap- 
pens if you miss a dose? Is 
there a less expensive gener- 




Tornadoes, drought, flooding, frost, and locust infestations are 
among the disasters your SimFarm crops might face. 



SimFarm lets you try farm- 
ing' in any area of the U.S. or 
in your own custom-tailored 
environment. It also includes 
a number of preconstructed 
farm scenarios for you to run. 
There's a lot to do and try in 
this open-ended simulation. 
As with other Maxis prod- 
ucts, there's no real game 
goal here, except to expand 
your operation. My children 
(aged 10 and 12) were total- 
ly fascinated with the opera- 
tion of the farm and with tend- 
ing the animals. It seems to 
me that SimFarm doesn't 
give you the feeling you get 
with SimCity that the game 
has a life of its own — it's a bit 
more s/mplistic. 

SHELDON LEEMON 



Maxis 

(800) 33-MAXIS 

$59.95 

Circle Reader Service Number 442 



ic brand available? 

These are just a few of 
the myriad questions raised 
about thousands of prescrip- 
tion and over-the-counter 
drugs. You could pester 
your friendly neighborhood 
pharmacist — if you have 
one — or wade through the 
pages of a complex refer- 
ence manual. Or you could 
load PharmAssist, a new Win- 
dows-based guide to health 
and medicine, and find the 
answers you need in a mat- 
ter of seconds. 

This outstanding interac- 
tive resource guide contains 
hundreds of full-color illustra- 
tions and expert information 
about medication and fami- 
ly health. Among the topics 
covered in depth are over- 
dose symptoms, drug inter- 
actions, medicine applica- 
tion, first aid, travel vac- 
cines, drug abuse, and com- 



mon ailments. In addition to 
its massive database of gen- 
eral drug information and 
classification, the program al- 
so features full-color graph- 
ics depicting actual cap- 
sules, tablets, and more. 

The intuitive push-button 
Windows design makes pro- 
gram navigation a breeze. 
Full printing capability al- 
lows you to create hardcop- 
ies of frequently used infor- 
mation. Of course, the pro- 
gram is meant only as a ref- 
erence supplement, not as 
a replacement for profession- 
al medical advice. But be- 
cause the health and well- 
being of your family are fun- 
damental concerns, Pharm- 
Assist could easily be the 
most important piece of soft- 
ware on your computer. 

SCOTT A. MAY 

Software Marketing 

(602) 893-3377 

$69.95 

Circle Reader Service Number 443 

MASTERCLIPS 

Need a flag of Japan to 
dress up your brochure? Or 
maybe you need a map of 
your state showing all the 
counties for your civic club? 
Masterclips includes these 
and nearly 6000 other piec- 
es of clip art to dress up 
your memos, advertising, or 
business correspondence, 
or to help create dynamic 
presentations. 

Masterclips is a collection 
of clip art with dozens of cat- 
egories. Each clip art file is 
in CGM format, which is im- 
portable into most DOS and 
Windows programs that im- 
port art; I had no trouble im- 
porting images into Micro- 
soft Word for Windows, Quat- 
tro Pro for Windows, and 
PageMaker. Masterclips in- 
cludes a list of over five doz- 
en applications that will ac- 
cept CGM-format clip art. 



y^fc&fflOTMBlefSS!; 



I^^S^^bSs 







i 






■ 







■:.: 



flSralf 



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••••■■■/■■ 

!nw]9Hinl 



To order ZEPHYR call (800) 325-8898. 
4 ff[0 GOMPUTim IM 



© 1994 New World Computing, Inc. ZEPHYR is a trademark of New World Computing. New Wc 
registered trademark of New World Computing, Inc. All rights reserved. 



Circle Reader Service Number 238 



REVIEWS 



Almost all the clip art in- 
cluded is in color and varies 
in quality and complexity. 
Most of the graphics are 
good-to-excellent in quality. 
These are business graph- 
ics, but students and home 
users will find many items 
they can use to dress up a 
report or a personal letter. 

Masterclips comes on ei- 
ther one CD-ROM or 34 3 1 / 2 - 
inch high-density floppies, 
The documentation includ- 
ed is adequate and con- 
tains a black-and-white pic- 
ture of each of the clip art 
images. Two utilities are al- 
so provided to assist you: a 
Windows clip art browser 
and a color-to-monochrome 
converter. Both of these are 
useful and nice extras, al- 
though perhaps not as well 
designed as they could be. 

Masterclips permits the 
use of its art on any 
hardcopy output — including 
advertising, letters, flyers, 
and so forth— as long as the 
art is not part of a piece 
that is sold, such as a book. 
But the company will make 
arrangements for commer- 
cial uses. 

Masterclips is a complete 
business clip art package 
that should be useful for an- 
yone needing to spruce up 
his or her output with profes- 
sional illustrations. 

STEPHEN LEVY 

Masterclips 

(305) 983-7440 

$260 

Circle Reader Service Number 444 

STAR TREK: 25TH 
ANNIVERSARY CD- 
ROM EDITION 

Interplay's reissue of Star 
Trek: 25th Anniversary on 
CD-ROM proves you can't 
have too much of a good 
thing. It's a terrific game 
made even better by the ad- 

112 COMPUTE JUNE 1994 



Masterclips: The Art Of Business 

Masterclips is a collection of over 6000 pieces of clip art in dozens of categories. Each 
clip art file is in CGM format which are importable into most DOS and Windows 
programs that import art. 





SECRETARIES 
DAY 



i 



The Masterclips collection packs nearly 6000 pieces of clip art, 
filling a CD-ROM or 34 high-density floppy disks. 




Interplay's Star Trek game takes on new life with the addition of the 
voices of the original crew of the Enterprise, 



dition of some very familiar 
sound effects. 

Indeed, Star Trek: 25th An- 
niversary has found its 
voice. Or voices, to be pre- 
cise. William Shatner, Le- 
onard Nimoy, DeForest Kel- 
ley, and the rest of the origi- 
nal crew lend their talents to 
this CD-ROM edition, voic- 
ing every bit of their on- 
screen counterparts' dia- 
logue. They've turned the 
game equivalent of a silent 



movie into a talkie. 

The results are tickling, es- 
pecially to Star Trek fans. In 
much the same way that 
John Williams's music 
brings Rebel Assault to life, 
so do the actors' voices and 
original-series sound effects 
propel Star Trek: 25th Anni- 
versary to warp speed. It's 
as though, for once, we ac- 
tually get to play a part in 
the Star Trek universe that 
so enchants us. 



Little else has changed in 
Star Trek: 25th Anniversary, 
save for a new ending. 
While owners of the original 
version may be reluctant to 
shell out more cash for 
more or less the same 
game, true fans should rec- 
ognize the CD-ROM edition 
for what it is: a collector's 
item and a uniquely interac- 
tive Star Trek adventure. 

RICK BROIDA 

Interplay 

(800) 969-GAME 

$59.95 

Circle Reader Service Number 445 

ELECTRIC 
READING LAND 

Folks routinely spot Elvis 
boarding a UFO, but how 
many parents would think to 
look for Jimi Hendrix in an 
early reading program? The 
phonics-based activities in 
Electric Reading Land help 
kids master a basic set of 
words, which they use to con- 
struct a storybook that will re- 
charge an ailing space sta- 
tion. Learning the words 
means playing three word- 
building games: Jimi's Phon- 
ics Toy, Dino Beach, and 
Dragon Park. 

Jimi's Phonics Toy is a 
great place for the very 
youngest kids to begin. This 
open-ended exploration al- 
lows kids to combine begin- 
ning consonant sounds with 
ending sounds. Children 
can make actual or non- 
sense words, without penal- 
ty. The program won't cre- 
ate profane words. At the 
same time, it doesn't recog- 
nize all possible combina- 
tions, such as y and ip. 

Dino Beach starts kids off 
with a picture-word match- 
ing game. Auditory reinforce- 
ment breaks the words into 
their phonetic components. 
When the picture of a jet ap- 
pears, for example, the 



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REVIEWS 



word jet is broken into /and 
et, then spoken aloud. The 
pictures soon give way to let- 
ters, and kids must pick the 
correct combination of let- 
ters (and sounds) to solve 
the puzzles. 

Dragon Park, featuring a 
dragon named Santana who 
sounds suspiciously like 
Jack Nicholson, adds the ele- 
ment of sorting to the word- 
building skills. Kids must 
place words into separate 
boxes according to the spo- 
ken directions. At this point, 
kids are recognizing whole 
words and are able to distin- 
guish the phonetic compo- 
nents used to create them. 

Electric Reading Land 
isn't as detailed in its anima- 
tion and graphics as other 
programs in this genre. None- 
theless, the characters will 
captivate young children, 
and the educational compo- 
nent is sound and well de- 
signed. A sound card is re- 
quired for Electric Reading 

114 COMPUTE JUNE 1994 




Kids play word-sorting games with Santana, the dragon of 
Wordstock Castle, in Electric Reading Land. 



Land to be truly effective. 

As kids learn words in the 
Dragon Park and Dino 
Beach games, they gain the 
word power necessary to 
complete the storybook and 
repair the damaged space 
station. Parents will want to 
go along for the ride in order 
to explore the hidden referenc- 
es to the 1960s, from Nixon 
to Easy Rider. Not to mention 
a bit of "Purple Haze." 
peter scisco 



D.C True 

(800) 929-1243 

$49.95 

Circle Reader Service Number 446 



VIDEO JAM 

If Steven Spielberg were a 
kid today, he'd probably be 
using a computer and a 
camcorder to make movies, 
rather than the 8-mm cam- 
era he started with. And no 
doubt he'd be watching mu- 



sic videos for ideas and en- 
couragement. Kids love mov- 
ies and music, and Video 
Jam brings both together in 
a clever and creative pro- 
gram for ages 8 and up. 

Video Jam uses a real stu- 
dio as its inspiration. Kids 
must first select the music 
for their video, then add ac- 
tors, scenery, and props. 
They can fine-tune their cre- 
ations with special effects 
and movements, all to the 
beat of the music. 

Creating a cartoon video 
is a lot simpler in this pro- 
gram than in real life, and all 
the right elements are here. 
Given some time, creative li- 
cense, and encouragement, 
kids will astonish their par- 
ents with some jammin' vid- 
eos that are as much fun to 
watch as they are to make. 

The program includes 52 
synthesized songs covering 
a variety of genres, from 
rock to rap and from west- 
ern classical to international. 
Audiophiles may wish for 
sampled MIDI tunes, but the 
synthesized music appeals 



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to kids and suits a greater 
number of sound cards, with- 
out requiring special audio 
equipment. The only draw- 
back is that there's no way 
to import your own music. 

As many as 7 of the 46 car- 
toon characters, ranging 
from hip cats to huggable di- 
nos, can be used in each vid- 
eo. Each character has an 
individual dance move. Kids 
can enliven the dance 
moves with special effects 
and transitions, which can be 
previewed before making 
them a final part of the video. 

While not as complex as a 
multimedia computer studio, 
Video Jam provides simple 
and exacting controls for mu- 
sic video editing. Actors can 
be made to appear at specif- 
ic times in the music. Using 
special effects, kids can mor- 
ph-transition one character in- 
to another. Beginning video 
directors can combine the pro- 
gram's collection of props 
with particular actors and 
backgrounds in order to tell 
stories. 

Each video can be saved 
to the program's video li- 
brary (stored on the comput- 
er's hard disk) or saved to a 
floppy disk. Kids can share 
their video creations with 
friends by passing along the 
floppy disk, which includes 
a program that will play the 
video, even if Video Jam 
isn't installed on the other 
computer (the player comput- 
er must meet the basic re- 
quirements of Video Jam). 

Creativity tools for kids 
are some of the most fasci- 
nating and potentially reward- 
ing embodiments of comput- 
er technology. Video Jam 
will let your kids make an 
impressive directorial debut. 
peter scisco 

Electronic Arts 
(800) 245-4525 
$49.95 

Circle Reader Service Number 447 

116 COMPUTE JUNE 1994 




Video Jam lets your kids create music videos which they can save 
to floppy and share with friends. 




Electronic Arts scores a goal with the sensational PC conversion of 
its best-selling NHL Hockey videogame. 



NHL HOCKEY 

Electronic Arts Sports body- 
checks the competition for a 
breakaway score with NHL 
Hockey, the sensational PC 
conversion of EA's best-sell- 
ing cartridge game. Packed 
with in-depth statistics, man- 
agerial options, and more 
hard-hitting action than you 
can slam a puck at, this 
one's a hardcore hockey 
fan's dream come true. 

Licensed by both the 
NHL and NHL Players Asso- 
ciation, the game has 24 ac- 
tual team names, colors, 
and logos. Real-life 28-man 
rosters feature such modern 
legends of the game as Pat- 
rick Roy, Adam Oates, Paul 



Coffey, Mario Lemieux, and 
Pavel Bure. Each player is 
rated in 15 skill attributes — 
from mobility and speed to 
shot power and aggressive- 
ness — based on your 
choice of 1992-93 season 
or playoff stats. Play options 
include one- or two-player 
head-to-head or coopera- 
tive exhibition games, as 
well as a full 84-game sea- 
son, complete with playoffs 
and Stanley Cup final. Sched- 
uled hockey games can 
match the 1992-93 season 
or be randomly assigned by 
the computer. 

Line editing couldn't be 
easier using the game's 
drag-and-drop graphic inter- 
face. Pull-down menus let 



you check player stats to de 
vise the ultimate forward, de 
fensive, penalty kill, and pow 
er play lines. Multiplaye 
leagues add exciting new di 
mensions, such as scoutint 
reports and player trades. / 
sophisticated league data 
base system allows individu 
al team managers to imporl 
export, merge, and updati 
league stats as the seasoi 
progresses. 

Hit the ice with the most re 
alistic hockey action seei 
on the PC. The rink li 
viewed vertically, from ; 
three-quarter angle, witl 
smooth eight-way scrolling 
across more than six fu 
screens. This perspective al 
lows larger-than-averagi 
characters and expressive 
animation— everything fron 
high-sticking and slashing 
to poke checks and slaf 
shots. Control methods in 
elude joystick (preferred) 
mouse, and keyboard. Joy 
stick response is fast ant 
tight, with a short-throv 
stick — such as the Gravi: 
PC GamePad— highly recom 
mended. Periods can be se 
to 5, 10, or 20 minutes, ant 
you can save and resunrn 
games in progress. Pausi 
the game at any time to en 
ter the press box to review 
stats, change lines, or stud' 
instant replays. VCR-styli 
controls offer excellent for 
ward and reverse single 
frame replays. In leagui 
play, you can also save re 
plays as highlight films. Sin 
gle-game stat categories in 
elude five team, eight play 
er, and three goalie perform 
ance ratings. 

Hockey purists will notici 
a few shortcomings in thn 
game's arcade action. Fore 
most is the limited puck har 
dling of your onscreen char 
acters, who are confined fe 
simple passing and aimet 
shots. Executing a one-time 
(a tricky pass-shot combina 



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REVIEWS 



tion) is as close as the 
game lets you come to mak- 
ing a skilled offensive 
move. There's no way to con- 
trol the strength or loft of 
your hit, nor the ability to en- 
act such moves as a drop 
pass, give-and-go, and 
snap pass. Also missing are 
penalty shots, direct goalie 
control, and closeup views 
of puck drops. Low-resolu- 
tion 320 x 200 VGA graph- 
ics produce somewhat 
blocky character features, al- 
though overall graphic qual- 
ity is high. Sound is also 
well incorporated, including 
digitized speech, crowd re- 
sponse, referee calls, and 
more than 70 samples of or- 
gan music. 

NHL Hockey pulls off an 
impressive hat trick, deliver- 
ing frenetic action, stats ga- 
lore, and challenging 
league play. Hopefully, this 
game provides only a taste 
of sports titles yet to come 
from EA Sports. 

SCOTT A. MAY 

Electronic Arts 

{800} 245-4525 

$69.95 

Circle Reader Service Number 448 

QUICK RESTART 

It's a clever idea. Before turn- 
ing off your computer, you 
press two keys to save a 
complete description of the 
running software onto disk. 
The next time you power up, 
Quick Restart quickly re-cre- 
ates your workspace just as 
you left it, including any doc- 
uments you were working 
on at the time. 

According to PowerPro 
Software, Quick Restart 
works under DOS versions 
3.3 and higher, with or with- 
out Windows 3.0 or 3.1. It's 
compatible with Dou- 
bleSpace and other popular 
disk doublers, and it direct- 
ly supports many Super 

118 COMPUTE JUNE 1994 




Air Duel lets you match up aircraft 
even pit a WWI biplane against a 

VGA and Windows acceler- 
ated video cards. But it 
doesn't get along well with 
memory managers other 
than DOS's HIMEM/ 
EMM386 combo and simply 
refuses to work with 
QEMM's Stealth mode, 
which many power users 
can't afford to give up. 

Quick Restart worked 
well enough on simple sys- 
tems, but it sometimes froze 
when restarting a machine 
loaded with drivers, TSRs, 
and several fussy applica- 
tions — the kind of system 
many of us actually use. It's 
also a tricky program to in- 
stall and set up, requiring in- 
formed decisions about the 
details of a system and its 
CONFIG.SYS and AUTOEX- 
EC.BAT files. Unfortunately, 
if you're advanced enough 
to know how to configure 
Quick Restart, there's a 
good chance that it won't 
work on your system. It's a 
great idea, and almost— but 
not quite— a great product. 

TIM VICTOR 



PowerPro Software 

(415)345-5128 

$39.95 

Circle Reader Service Number 449 



from every era in battle — you can 
modern F-16. 



AIR DUEL 



Do you have what it takes to 
be a top gun? Air Duel, by 
MicroProse, is a flight simu- 
lator that tests your abilities 
as a combat pilot across six 
historical scenarios. You'll fly 
planes as simple as Germa- 
ny's famous Fokker DR1 
triplane and as complex as 
the high-tech F-16 Falcon 
fighter jet. 

Choosing from one of 
three basic modes, you de- 
cide the type of aircraft 
you'll fly and the theater of 



battle. The Duel mode pits 
aircraft from the same era 
against each other in one- 
on-one combat, the Mis- 
sions mode lets you plan 
and fly tactical missions, 
and the What If mode match- 
es aircraft from different 
eras against each other. 

Impressive 3-D graphics 
and the responsiveness of 
the controls give a lifelike 
quality to your flight. The dog- 
fight simulations test not on- 
ly your piloting skills but 
your battle strategy as well. 
It's not always the fastest 
plane that wins the battle; 
it's the best pilot. 

Air Duel allows you to ex- 
perience the fast-paced, 
heart-pounding world of aer- 
ial battle at any skill level. 
You can play against the 
computer or go head to 
head with a friend, via mo- 
dem, as you battle for air su- 
premacy. Even the best com- 
puter opponents rarely pro- 
vide the same challenge as 
a human foe. The flight mod- 
els aren't ultrarealistic, but 
the action is fast paced. 

ROBERT STONE 



MicroProse 
(410) 771-0440 
$59.95 

Circle Reader Service Number 450 



SPEAK UP! 

Is there a hardware or software product 

you'd like to see reviewed in COMPUTE? 

Let us know by calling 

(900) 285-5239. 

The call will cost 95 cents per minute, 

you must be 18 or older, 

and you must use a touch-tone phone. 

Sponsored by Pure Entertainment, 

505 South Beverly Drive, California 90212. 




OVER lOOO TITLES IN STOCK 5 



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Bibles and Religion 
Complete Bookshop 
Computer Ref. Library 
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Encycl. of Sound 1 
Encycl. of Sound 2 
Gardening 
HAM Radio v3.0 
Hugos House of Horrors 



Legal Guide 
Multimedia Mania 
MVP Game Jamboree 
Our Solar System 
Sound Sensations 
Techno Tools 
Too Many Type Fonts 
Windoware 
World Traveler 



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ATrxj's Teacher Trouble 
Cress Mcrtac r*a Lampoon 



ireMfi 



Porky Pig Cartoons 
Betty Boop Cartoons 
Bugs Bunny Cartoons 



Qa&sic Cartoons 
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The Three Stooges Fest. 
Godzilla vs. Megalon 
Night of the Living Dead 
Flash Cards Videos 
Hilarious Sports Bloopers 
HIV/AIDS Resource Guide 



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$33.00 



Conspracy 

Cu38 of Enchonfla 

Dark Seed 

Drocua Unleashed 

Dragons Lctr- PC 

Dun* 

EcoQuesl 

Eric ine Unready 

Fatty Bears Brtnaay Sup. 

ITgjTtStTMJcrtorTooMT 

Game Master 

GamePackl 

Games t993 

GcrneMore Cotecflon 

Geekwod Games 

Global B?)torer 

MerceaftGoT 

GLrahp20O0 

Guy Spy 

HJOCfe 

The Hood 

l-kxBe of Games 

Thertmans 

Indiana Jones Fate Aflantls 

ronHefe 

Janes n Fast Lane 

Jouneyman Protect 

Jutland 

Karaoke forty ft* 

Kings Guest u 

LabyfrTfri of Time 

LBow2: Dagger Anon Ra 

Urts Cotectors 

Legend of Kyranda 

Loom 

Lard of me Rfrigs 

MadDogMCQee 

Manhole 

Martoc Mansion.- DayThtote 

MY5T 

Focffie Srrte & Speech Pak 

PC StG World of Games 

Fatrcton 

FblceQjest4 

QjantunGate 

Race frie Clock 

Rmgwartd 

REBEL ASSAJU 

Rerun of tne Pnomom 

RETURN TO ZCfiK 

Scl-R Fantasy 

Saabbte Detu*e 

Secret \LuftVYOfre 

Secret Mantey IsJcnd 

Seventh Guest 



Desktop Pir> Cream Disk 

BectronlcLJbof At 

FarrteEta Fonts & Sands 

Fcotaxcess window 

Fonts for ProPU*her 

Fractal Ecstacy 

G»F5Gc*oxy 

Jets&Props 

JletT Fonts 

Kodak Photo CD Access 

MocVUznd 

Mother Ea1n2 

Ftei ftjrlect Graphics 

PLCfch It 2.0 (PCS) 

Pittsh It 3.0 (V*0 



$25.00 

$23.00 
$23.00 
$11.00 
$27.00 
$37.00 
$19.00 
$18.00 
$19.00 
$14.00 
$14.00 
S29.00 
$15.00 
515.00 
$49.00 



Kids Can Read: 
tftcess. Scary Poems For Rotten 
Idas. Tate Of Fetor Rat**, and morel 
$19.00 each 

Languages of the Wbrtd $19,00 

Learn Speak Spanish $57.00 

[Bart*} Adventure S12.00 

Macmian Diet for Chldren $19.00 

Mcrosoft Dnosaurs 565.00 

Monarch Notes $54.00 

NaT Geog Mammals $24.00 

Flaying w/ Language: 

Wro gemes fri Englsh. French 

German, Japanese, or Spanish 

$25.00 each 



Sherlock Cons 3 

Space QjestfV 

Star Trek Calection 

Stefcr7 

Stile Commander w/ldct tv 

Terminator 2 Chess Was 

TetrlsGdti 

Twin's Wbrtd 



yctavecta&Vbndo 
Lost Dho Egg 
Hypnotic Hop 
TetefarceRay 
UmpTe Cofti-i 
Cyterplasm Force 
$39.00 each 



llttma 7 comptele 
IfflmaBflc Speech Pak 



518.00 
$35.00 
$19.00 
$49.00 
$24.00 
$49.00 
$39.00 
$47.00 
$33.00 
$19.00 
$39.00 
$45.00 
545.00 
$15.00 
$19.00 
$24.00 
$14.00 
$25.00 
$69.00 
$54.00 
$39.00 
$19.00 
$59.00 
$54.00 
$12.00 
$29.00 
$42.00 
$65.00 
$15.00 
$49.00 
$49.00 
$49.00 
$34.00 
$57.00 
$24.00 
519.00 
545.00 
$14.00 
$49.00 
$39.00 
$29,00 
540.00 
$15.00 
$59 00 
559.00 
515.00 
$39.00 
549.00 
559.00 
$39.00 
$44.00 
548.00 
549.00 
$29.00 
519.00 
$29.00 
515.00 
515,00 
545.00 
$54.00 
$49.00 
$15.00 
$33.00 
$15.00 
$59.00 
$35.00 
$44.00 
$29.00 



$49.00 
$55.00 



Video Cube Space 
who KBed Sam Rupert? 
Wty Beamish 
Wtog CM* 2\Jt Uhdrwtd 

uarpacfc 
World Oait 



LITERATURE 

DonQuhote 
Electronic Home Ubrary 
Greatest Books Cctecflon 
Great Mystery Classics 
Great Fbetry Oasslcs 
irterccttve Storyline VT 
interocflwe Storytlme V2 
interact** Storytlrne V3 
Jut Grandma &. Ms 
Lfcfayof IheFutue 
MbedLtoMGoase 
Comp Worts of Shakespeare 
Sherlock Haines - Comp Warts 



5)9.00 
$19.00 
$15.00 
$59.00 
$45.00 
$44.00 



MISCELLANEOUS 



CDSpeeaVoy 
Jewel Coses 



MUSIC & SOUND 



9000 Sounds 

999+ .WVFles 
m Music Gufcte 



Composer GLest 

Cr Music Lab 
Cr of Sard 
Grammy Awards 
Hot Sard & vision 
Intro Oostod Music 

MDI Music Shop 
KG Musical mslninerrt 
McrojcnSrrcMnsk 
ReeoLCce Lbroy Auoto 
Sard Effects Lfcray 

SOLITdWW 

Vhdal 

wove FCd WhatowB 



CidWv»»)Cr«cli.MorwCiOW. «SA.NfasWCa« Mwacan Ej«a«4. o»CCO OtClet Cw pfone rnai 



PROGRAMMING 

Aa^Ftorjarnrnlng 

C Users Group Ub 

Companion forCS^2 

DrCW Gold 

Gabo 

HobbesOS^ 

Lon Master 

Ftogjcrrrneo RCM 

Resource Ub Lang Operalton 

SintelZO 

ScaceCCD 

Super Ftogrammer 

Lhr*C 

\*iuclfteorySlorterKn 

X11R5GNU 

REFERENCE 



Ataaft Encyctopecla 

American Herttoge Diet 

Ajdubon Bteh or Mommas 

BbteUbray 

BcokofUsts<i3 

Qnernonlo94 

Complete House 

Compton 'rier Encyctopeata 

Consumer 'rttormation 

Coakbock Heaven 

Diet Li*g World 

Heamg Fas Fiecr Cookoook 

EncycWC6.0,ST. 



$19.00 
$24.00 
$39.00 
$39.00 
$39.00 
$15.00 
$18.00 
$18.00 
$29.00 
$39.00 
$15.00 
$12.00 
$12.00 



557.00 
51.00 
$59.00 
$24.00 
$15.00 



$19.00 
$15.00 
$43.00 



$13.00 
513.00 
$33.00 
$19.00 
$39.00 
545.00 
$15.00 
$55.00 
$5500 
$14.00 
$15.00 
515.00 
$29.00 
$15.00 



519.00 
52400 
514,00 
513.00 
$13.00 
513.00 
$25.00 
$25.00 
$19.00 
$13.00 
$19.00 
$12.00 
$19.00 
$49.00 
$19.00 



$23.00 
$39.00 
$17.00 
$25.00 
539.00 
$59.00 
$27.00 
$87.00 
$24.00 
$14.00 
$23.00 
$35.00 
539.00 



EiqDfarfrig Aictenr Acnftectue 

Fcmly Doctor 

FoodAnayjt 

Front Row Bosebol Cads 

Great Ntwd Baties 

GUness 1993 

Hacker OTontotes 

Hstory of ire World 

HDVBtte&ChrtstlanShvae 

H=me Designer DC6/WIN 

Hone MBctod Advisor Pro 

Home Remedes 

■us FdcfrHowTnTCB Wlc 

■us Fact5:How Wbrtd Wtts 

JFK /ssoBstrtton 

JS Nw*- Prague Cootocok 

King Janes Btote 

Languages of World 

LsBto^hfoLBA 

Mop EffWt MbsSfr AtasUSA2 

MayoCirtc 

Mega Movie Glide 

Mcrosoft Encarta 94 

MurmLB of Earth 

National Fate 

NewZecfcndQrds 

North American Hddra 

CKford Enafch Ref Ub 

Pi Book 

FfcntDoctar » 

Pfesatat. Drugs 

Reference Lb, ST. 

Street flics USA 

Time Desert Storm 

Tony LasUssa Bcsebcl 2 

lota Bosebol 1993 

Mayo ante* Tata Heart 

USA Stale Factbook 

USA Was-. CM Wa 

USA Was-: Korea 

USA Was; VWlC 

USA Was Metnan 

US Hstory 

Video Movie GUde 

SHAREWARE 

Adventures In Heaven 

a*omia Cciecilon 

CCAWtodoM 

Companion for Whatowe 

Doctor of Gomes 

Doctor of Snaewae 1 a 2 

Doctor of WtocbwB 

Han«ie93 

Ubrb MQTnD 

Megabyte Monster 

MghtCvJll 

Ortgind Shorewae 

FC8»G13 

FOS1G Wbrtd of Games 

PC-aG World of EducoJlon 

FCSG World of WtootowB 

GRZHomRaolo 

REBSInaBar 

Snaewae V3 

Snaewae Heaven 

Sroewae Heaven 2 

Snaewae Studo 3 

Snarewae Supreme 

Softv»ae vbutt Goid Cd. 

SoftwaevtUtPkjruri 

Super CD3 

Wtodow Master 

WtodoMl993 

vyncfcM* Ooiecflan 

V*do*a Heaven 

WtodoMRus 

WtoabwB Shaevvare Goid 

WlNPfcairxm 

Wbrtd of Snaewae 



$43.00 

$19.00 
531.00 
$33.00 
$55.00 
520.00 
$24.00 
$59.00 
$15.00 
$29.00 
$49.00 
$33.00 
535.00 
535.00 
$45.00 
$23.00 
$19.00 
$19.00 
$29.00 
$49.00 
$18.00 
$39.00 
$89.00 
$45.00 
$19.00 
527,00 
$25.00 
$94.00 
533.00 
525.00 
$29.00 
515.00 
589.00 
519.00 
$55.00 
$19.00 
$44.00 
$29.00 
$29.00 
$29.00 
529.00 
$25.00 
$19.00 
$27.00 



$14.00 
$12.00 
$12.00 
$15.00 
$13.00 
$13.00 
$13.00 
$19.00 
$29.00 
$15.00 
$29.00 
$9.00 
$22.00 
$15.00 
$15.00 
$15.00 
$12.00 
S25.0O 
524.00 
5 12.00 
519.00 
515.00 
519.00 
515.00 
514.00 
512.00 
S15.00 
524.00 
512.00 
514.00 
$14.00 
$1500 
$12.00 
$29.00 



Man/ Man/ More, 
Including ADULT rifles I! 

Puerto Bco. Mmco. and Canoao odd SB 00 pe< 



moraJacMWi wemon^ Mem ard ovataC*ty aw *uCj«ei » aw©* wtxi* r* 



- n - !>'■ • fWS -> 



Free Spirit Software, Inc. - 1-800-638-5757 - PO Box 158 - 109 W Pearl Street - Trafalgar, In 46181 



Circle Reader Service Number 115 



CHIPS & BITS 



PO BOX 234 ROCHESTER, VT 05767 DEPT 10057 

FREE GAME OFFER 

Call 800-699-4263 Fax 802-767-3382 
Int'l 802-767-3033 Source 1 



/Orders 
ame as cash. COD $8. Defectives replaced with same 
terns shipped same day. Shipping times may 
re/availability may change, All sales final 
OVERNIGHT SHIPPING in US $4 per order. Mail to 
Canada. PR, HI, AK. APO. FPO S4 per order. 4-8 day 
Worldwide shipping $6 per item. Handling $2 per shipment. 




'ORIGAMO' Advance through the maze by success- 
fully completing each puzzle. Place blocks and 
shapes on the puzzle as a conveyor belt moves along 
or your blocks will stack up and time will run out. $39 




'LINKS PRO CASTLE PINES' Set in the beautiful land 
of Colorado is the Castle Pines Golf Club designed by 
Jack Nicklaus. This course offers 7,495 yards of golf- 
ing challenge, the longest PGA Tour course. S1 9 



'7th GUEST: 11th 
HOUR' Sequel to 
7th Guest except 
the stakes are 
higher, the 

puzzles more 
clever and the re- 
turn visit even 
more unsettling. 
Solve puzzles and 
investigate clues 
that take you 
through Staufs 
haunted house with 
movie-like plot 
twists, special ef- 
fects and music 
soundtrack. CDS54 





'THRUSTM ASTER'S FORMULA T1 ' is the most re- 
alistic control for all of today's driving simulators. 
Features fully functional steering wheel, brake and 
gas pedals and turbo boost gauge. $1 29 



IBM HARDWARE 



IBM ADVENTURE 



IBM ADVENTURE 



IBM SIMULATIONS 



IBM STRATEGY 



Acoustic Rsearch P622 S239 
AdLib Sound Card $34 

Advancd Gravis Ultrsnd$129 
Altec ACS 200 Speakrs$209 
Altec ACS 3 Spkr Sys S169 
Altec ACS 300 wSubwf $299 
Altec ACS 50 Speakers $79 
CH Weapons System 544 
Cyberman $69 

Fighter Stick $79 

Flight Stick $36 

Flight Stick Pro $57 

Gravis Anolog Pro Jystk $34 
Gravis PC Game Pad $19 
Jet Stick 529 

Labtec CS-1000 Spkrs 575 
LabtecCS-1200 Spkers 584 
Labtec CS-1 400 Spkers $89 
Labtec CS-700 Spkers $32 
Labtec CS-800 Spkers $30 
Labtec CS-900 Spkers $63 
Media Cncpt Sblstr Clon $39 
NEC3XE MSp Ext CD $599 
NEC 3XI MSpn Int CD $499 
Notebook Gameport $42 
Pilot Control Stand $19 

Pro Audio Spectrum 16 $139 
Pro Audio Spect 16 Bas$109 
Reel Magic CD Upgrd $599 
Reel Magic Vid Upgrd $385 
Sound Blaster 16 ASP $214 
Sound Blastr 16 Basic $129 
Sound Blaster Dlx 379 

SBIastr Discovry CD 16 $31 5 
SBIastr Powerd Spkers $25 
Sound Blaster Pro Dlxe $89 
Sound Galaxy BX2 S59 

SGIxy NXPR016 MMD $449 
Sound Machine Pro 16 $139 
Sound Man Wave $195 

SoundMan 16 $99 

Thrustmstr Driving Sys $129 
Thrustmt FCSPro UProm$19 
ThrustmasterGame Crd $27 
Thrustmstr Rudder Sys $99 
Thrustmaster WCS 2 $94 
Thrustmtr UProm WCS2 $19 
Voiceblaster Bundle $52 



IBM ADVENTURE 



7th Guest 2:11th Hr CD $54 
Alien Legacy $42 

Alone in the Dark 2 $34 

Beneath a Steel Sky CD S39 
Bioforge CD $52 



Blake Stone Episode 1 $9 
Bloodnet CD $43 

Chaos Continuum CD $44 
Companions of Xanth $32 
Darkseed 2 $42 

Day of the Tentacle $35 

Doom Episode 1 $12 

Dracula Unleashed CD $47 
Dragon Knight 3 or CD $46 
DragonsphereCD 548 

Evolution or CD $39 

Fred P. Frontr Pharmct 2 $44 
Freelancer 2 1 20 or CD $42 
Gabriel Knight $39 

Gateway 2 CD $29 

Gateway Collet 1&2 CD $36 
Harvester CD $52 

Hook $32 

Horde CD $49 

In Extremus $42 

Indy Jones Ft Atlntis CD $42 
Inherit the Earth $45 

Innocent Until Caught $34 
Isle of the Dead $36 

Jagged Alliance $48 

Journeyman Prjct 2 CD $52 
Jurassic Park $39 

King's Quest 6 Upgd CD $24 
King's Ransom CD $38 

Kronolog : Nazi Paradox $36 
Lands of Lore 2 $42 

Leather Goddesses 2 $39 
Lggnd of Kyrandia or CD $32 
Leisure Suit Larry 6 CD $39 
Man Enough CD $42 

Microcosm CD $49 

Myst CD $48 

Noctropolis $48 

Out of this World $36 

Phantasmagoria CD $59 
Police Quest 5 CD $48 

Quantum Gate WIN CD $45 
Quest for Glory 4 or CD $39 
Return To Zork CD $48 

Return of Phantom CD $38 
Ringworld CD $38 

Robinsn's Requm or CD $42 
Sam &Max Hit Road CD $42 
Secret of 7th Labyrinth $42 
Shadow Caster $34 

Shadow of Comet CD $48 
Simon the Sorcerer $32 

Space Quest 4 CD $37 

Star Trek 25 Annivrs CD $54 
Star Trk: Str Fit Acad CD $52 
System Shock CD $52 

Terror of the Deep or CD $36 



The Dig $40 

Treasure Huntrs, Inc CD 548 
Tuneland CD $36 

Ultimate Domain CD 544 
Under a Killing Moon CD $55 
Voyeur CD $48 

Wing Commdr U UW CD $55 
Zombie Dino CD $48 



Falcon 3.0 $46 

Falcon Gold CD $49 

Flight $52 

Flight Sim Toolkit CD $54 
Great Naval Battls 2 CD 542 
Harrier Asslt SVGA CD $44 
Jet Pack CD $44 

Lawn Mower Man CD $42 
Maximum Ovrkill Bdl CD $59 



Fifth Fleet $42 

Genghis Khan 2 $34 

Gettysbrg: Inter Batt CD S42 

Grandest Fleet $36 

Hannibal $32 

Kingmaker $34 

Koshan Conspiracy CD $48 

Master of Orion $39 

Mechamander or CD $42 



NeurodancerCD $49 

New Wave Hookrs 1 CD S32 
Nightwatch Intractiv CD $36 



IBM ROLE PLAYING 


Mech Wars or CD 
Mechwarrior 2 or CD 
MiG29GoldCD 


$48 
$46 
$52 


Merchant Prince 
Napoleonics 
New World Order 


$39 
$34 






$38 


All Character Editors 


516 


MS Flight Sim 5.0 


S46 


Operation Europe 


S42 


ADD Collectors Edition 3519 


Nomad or CD 


$39 


Outpost or CD 


S39 


Al-Qadim CD 


549 


Operation Airstorm CD 


$42 


Patrician CD 


$36 


Arena: Elder Scrolls 


$44 


Pacific Strike 


$49 


Pax Imperia 


$42 


Challenge of 5 Realms 


$39 


Privateer CD 


556 


Perfect General 2 


$44 


Dark Sun CD 


$49 


Privateer Spec Op 1or2 


S22 


Perict General Sc2 20th 


$23 


Darklands Mstr Ed wbk 


$51 


Rally 


$29 


Railroad Tycoon 2 


$39 


Disciples of Steel 


S35 


Sea Wolf CD 


$52 


Rules of Engagement 2 


S34 


Dungeon Hack CD 


$34 


Semper Fi 


$44 


Sim Ant CD 


$48 


Eye of the Beholder 3 


$42 


Serf City: Life is Feudal 


$42 


Sim City CD 


$48 


Eye of Beholder 3 CD 


$48 


Strike Commander CD 


$55 


Sim City Classic 


$26 


Forgotten Castle CD 


S55 


TFXCD 


545 


Sim City 2000 


$39 


Hero's of M & M or CD 


$45 


Team Yankee 2 CD 


529 


Sim City 2000 CD 


$45 


Lands of Lore CD 


$41 


Theme Park CD 


$48 


Simcity 2000 Grt Disstrs S18 


Lord of the Rings CD 


$45 


Tie Fighter 


$48 


Sim Earth 


$29 


Lords of Midnight CD 


$55 


Tornado CD 


$42 


Sim Earth CD 


$48 


Might & Magic 5 


536 


Tower 


$42 


Sim Farm 


$29 


Pirates Gold 


S39 


U-Boat 2 


$36 


Sim Life DOS or WIN 


$29 


Ravenloft CD 


552 


Wild Blue Yonder CD 


$49 


Space Hulk CD 


$42 


Shadow Caster CD 


S45 


Wing Armada 


$54 


Star Control 2 


$34 


Star Trek Dp Space 9 


$52 


Wing Commdr 2 Dlx CD 


S29 


Stronghold CD 


$36 


Star Trek Next Gen CD 


S56 


Wing Commander 3 CD 


S54 


Task Force 1942 


S36 


Syndicate CD 


S42 


Wing Commandr Acady 


$25 


Tegel's Mercenaries 2 


S44 


Ultima 7 Black Gate 


S47 


World Circuit CD 


534 


Tigers on the Prowl 


$42 


Ultima 7 Series CD 


$42 


X-Wing Missn Dk 1or2 


519 


Walls of Rome 


539 


Ultima 7.5 Serpent Isle 


$48 


Zephyr 


$45 


Warlords 2 Scenario Ed 


$29 


Ultima 8 Pagan 


548 
$47 
$17 
$59 
$42 






When Two Worlds War 


$34 


Ultima 8 CD 


IBM STRATEGY 




Ultima 8 Speech Pack 


P IBM ADULT 


Ultima Uworld 1 & 2 CD 


A Train W Constrctn Set $32 


Uncharted Waters 






World of Xeen CD 


$40 


Advanced Civilization 


S35 


101 Sex Positions CD 


$36 






Aide de Camp 
Campaign 2 
Carriers at War 2 
Castles 2 CD 


$49 
S36 
$39 
$49 


3D Dream Girls CD 
All Beauties CD 
Baby's Got Butt CD 
College Girls CD 


$36 


IBM SIMULATIONS 


$24 
$32 






$34 


AH-64 B Longbow 


$54 


Celtic Tales: Balor of EvilS42 


Debby Does Dallas CD 


$38 


Aces Over Europe 


$39 


Civilization 


544 


Devil in Miss Jones CD 


$34 


Across the Rhine 


$48 


Command and Conquer 


542 


Dirty Adult Cartoons CD 


$34 


Air Combat Pacific 1942 $48 


Cybergo 


539 


Ecstacy CD 


$29 


Armored Fist 


$44 


D-Day: Beginning of End $39 


European Erotica CD 


$34 


Battlecruiser 3000 


$45 


Darklegions CD 


$39 


Femme Fatale 


$26 


Evolver 


$38 


Dominus 


$39 


G.I.F.s keep on Givg CD $25 


Eye of the Storm Fit Sim $29 


Empire Dlx Mastr Ed CD $45 


Hs of Sleepg Beauts CD $29 


FA 18 Hornet or CD 


554 


Fantasy Fiefdom CD 


$48 


Madame's Familly CD 


$38 



Overexposed CD 
Pandor....AAAH'S CD 
Physical Therapy CD 
Sex Olympics 
Sinfully Yours CD 
Southern Beauties CD 



$39 
$27 
$19 
$19 
$29 
$34 



Circle Reader Service Number 197 



Strip Poker Professional $34 
Toy's Not Boys CD $29 

Weekend at Ernies CD $26 
Wicked Whispers CD $29 



IBM TRADITIONAL 



Americans in Space CD $41 
Bridge Baron WIN $34 

Chessmniac 5 BNI&1 CD $34 
Classic 5 $32 

Den Millr: Nws to Me CD $25 
Gambit, Kasparov's $39 

Game-Maker Ver 2.0 $49 
Go Master Dlx V 5 WIN $79 
H. Barbara Animt Wkshp $39 
Hard Day's Night CD $25 
Hong Kong MJ Pro $32 

Hoyle's Book Games V3 $29 
It's a Wonderful Life CD $39 
Lexicross $24 

Lucky's Casino Advent $38 
Russian Six Pack $26 

Solitaires Journey 2 536 

Street Atlas USA Win CDS89 
Trump Castle 3 CD $29 

Video Cube CD $45 

Videogame Solution CD $29 
Zig-Zag $34 



FREE GAME OFFER 



Spend S60 on any in stock 
software and choose a free 
IBM game from the list below. 
Offer subject to change or 
cancellation without notice. 
Valid from May 1st through 
Jun 31 st or while supplies last. 

Artura, Sound Star, Airborne 
Ranger, Gunship, SDI, Wheel 
of Fortune 1 or 2 5.25, 
Obliterator, 3 in 1 Players 
Pack, Video Poker Villa 
Crespo, Punisher5.25 

COM694 



Advertisers' Index 



Reader Service Number/Advertiser 



Page Reader Service Number/Advertiser 



Page Reader Service Number/Advertiser 



Page 



124 
244 
242 
199 
198 
162 
157 

137 
166 
113 



173 

192 
197 
182 

170 
209 
250 

225 
204 

125 

161 
145 
131 
119 

134 
115 
150 
249 
148 
217 
184 
121 



Abacus 7 231 

Access Software 48,49 243 

Activision 91 178 

Advanced Digital Systems 109 143 

AldeLabsInc 129 237 

Amtex Software 105 241 

Amtex Software 87 136 

America OnLine 65i 200 

Automap Inc 31 176 

BabyDoc 127 111 

Bare Bones Software 128 

Berlitz 14 

Best Personalized Books 126 233 

Blue Valley Software 124 191 

Bon-Vue Enterprises 128 238 

Broderbund 103 234 

Chips & Bits 120 

CJCware 124 114 

Cleveland Institute of Electronics 33 160 

Compaq IFC.1 

Compaq 10,11 133 

CompSult 128 168 

Computer Business Service 127 221 

Computer Friends 124 235 

Computer Gallery 125 

Comtrad Industries 38,39 

Creative Labs 3 

D & K Enterprises, Inc 127 

Delphi Internet Services 21 224 

DemoSource 131 138 

DemoSource 125 122 

Discovery Channel Home Entertainment 69 127 

Disks O'Plenty 130 129 

Fantazia Concepts 124 212 

Free Spirit Software 119 

Gametek 115 120 

Grolier Electronic Publishing 5 116 

Groupware 131 185 

Heme Data Systems 124 109 

ID Software 107 126 

Intellimedia Sports, Inc 77 210 

Intuit 59 147 



Jackson Marking Products 125 

Keystone Learning Softwre 123 

LACE 125 

Logitech 54 

Lucas Arts Entertainment 99 

Lucas Arts Entertainment 43 

Media Graphics International, Inc 124 

Media Vision 71 

Merit Software 35 

MicroProse 13 

Microsoft Press 46,47 

Mother's File Exchange 123 

National Claims Service 131 

Needham's Electronic Inc 131 

New World Computing 111 

NovaLogic IBC 

NRl/Mc Graw Hill 23 

Opcode Interactive 75 

Origin 51 

Orion Business International, Inc 130 

Papyrus 117 

Parsons Technology 27 

PC Enterprises 130 

Pendragon Software Library 124 

Penthouse OnLine 128 

Penthouse Modem 114 

Personal Image Systems 126 

Pierce Aviation 130 

Profit Group, The 129 

Ramco Computer Supplies 127 

ReadySoft Inc 100 

REG Publishing 129 

Rhotech Labs 130 

SafeSoft Systems Inc 130 

School of Computer Training 125 

Serif PagePlus 15,17 

SeXXy Software 128 

Sierra OnLine BC 

Smart Luck Software 130 

SoftShoppe 130 

Software Support International 125 

Software Toolworks 53 



245 Software Toolworks 9 

189 Studio Magic Corporation 73 

Thoughtware 132 

142 Thrustmaster 12 

193 TMI Publishing 108 

112 U.S. Robotics 81 

190 Uni-ROM 128 

132 Virgin Games 84,85 

146 Virgin Games 95 

194 Virtual Reality Labs 123 

172 Wedgwood Rental 130 

247 Windows OnLine 124 

WOL/lnternational Correspondence School 41 

149 Zygon International 122 

Classifieds 133,134,135 

Product Mart 125,126127,128,129,130,131 

Windows Mart 123,124 



COMPUTE'S SharePak Disk 113 

OMNI UFO Subscription 97 

PC DiskSubscription 64 







CREDITS 

Cover: Photo by Mark Wagoner of an Austin Pen- 
tium displaying Windows wallpaper from Second 
Nature; page 4: Mark Wagoner; page 22: Mark 
Wagoner; page 24: Mark Wagoner; page 29: 
Mark Wagoner; page 30: Mark Wagoner; page 
45: Tom Carroll/FPG; page 65: Rob Schuster; 
page 66: Rob Schuster; page 68: Rob Schuster; 
page 70: Rob Schuster; page 72: Rob Schuster; 
page 74: Rob Schuster; page 76: Rob Schuster; 
page 80: Michael Simpson/FPG; page 82: Mark 
Wagoner; page 88: Mark Wagoner; page 92: 
Anthony Vanderlinden/Photon; page 94: Anthony 
Vanderlinden/Photon; page 96: Anthony Vander- 
linden/Photon; page 98: Anthony Vanderlinden/ 
Photon. 


IMPORTANT NOTICE 

FOR 

COMPUTE DISK 

SUBSCRIBERS 

COMPUTE offers two different disk products for 
PC readers: the SharePak disk and PC Disk. 
SharePak is monthly and has a subscription 
price of $59.95 for 5 1 /4-inch disks and $64.95 for 
3 1 /2-inch disks. A subscription to SharePak 
does not include a subscription to the maga- 
zine. PC Disk appears in odd-numbered 
months and has a subscription price of $49.95, 
which includes a subscription to COMPUTE. You 
can subscribe to either disk or to both, but a 
subscription to one does not include a subscrip- 
tion to the other. 



JUNE 1994 COMPUTE 121 



BEYOND VIRTUAL REALITY 



Learning Machine Breakthrough! 



Learn Foreign Languages Overnight, 

Reprogram Your Mind for Success & Launch 

into Virtual Fantasy Experiences! 




X IT 



By Dane Spotts 

Ihe first time I 
plugged my 
mind into it, I 
was reminded of the 
'50s sci-fi classic 
Fantastic Planet, If you've never seen 
the movie, an astronaut on the planet 
Krill discovers an incredible learning 
technology — a helmet hooked up to a 
super sophisticated computer that 
downloads knowledge directly onto 
your brain cells. 

What once was science fiction may 
now be science fact. The Learning 
Machine" has arrived. A profound 
breakthrough, this amazing invention 
stimulates your mind and opens your 
learning centers. Then like magic it 
pours in new information and skills. It's 
fun and entertaining. 

Plug Your Mind Into 
Super-Sonic Learning Power 

Let's say you want to learn a foreign 
language, quadruple your reading 
speed, or increase your math skills. Or 
give your children a powerful edge in 
school, learning 300%-500% faster than 
their peers. 

You select a specially programmed 
Learning Disc in the area you want to 
study. Plug it into any ordinary CD 
player. Then attach your Learning 
Machine digital headset into the head- 
phone jack. Push play and a few 
moments later your mind is launched 
into a pre-programmed learning ses- 
sion. In a fun, almost effortless way, the 
Learning Disc lesson plan unfolds its 
program and transfers the knowledge 
into your mind. It's incredible! 

Amazing Light-Sound Matrix 
Stimulates Your Mind 

How does it work? A digital program 
embedded in the CD, called a Learning 
Matrix', sends a combination of light 



and sound instructions through the 
Learning Machine digital headset to 
stimulate the optimum mind-state for 
learning. 

During your learning session you'll 
be asked to listen to audio instructions 
while you review written materials. 
While this information is still fresh in 
your mind, the narrator instructs you to 
lower your Light Pulse Shield, and your 
Learning Disc fires an amazing light- 
sound matrix that instantly relaxes you. 
This highly relaxed mind-state helps 
lock the new information into your 
memory. 

Learning Discs™ 
Teach Foreign Languages, 
Speed Reading, And More 

Learning foreign languages, or anything 
for that matter, at rocket speed can be 
very empowering. And I'm going to 
include a ton of valuable Learning Disc 



And for your kids, a 
SuperPhonics' read- 
ing program. Over 
$200 worth of Learn- 
ing Discs make this 
the deal of the centu- 
ry. But I want to 
show off its other 
amazing powers and 
give you 10 more rea- 
sons for ordering it. 

3-D Mind Sync 
Induces Virtual 
Fantasy Experiences 

So I'll include an amazing 3-D Mind 
Sync" Library, with 10 amazing whole- 
brain synchronization programs on 3 
CDs, to turn your Learning Machine into 
a powerful meditation, self-hypnosis, 
and dream-induction computer. 

The 3-D Mind Sync Library I'm 
bundling includes the following titles: 




THE OLD WAY vs. THE LEARNING MACHINE WAY 




Learning the old way is frustrating and boring. With the Learning Machine, you 
download information into your memory. Plus, it's entertaining and fast! 



software with your Learning Machine so 
you can get immediate results from this 
new technology. You'll receive 4 lan- 
guage courses — French, German, 
Spanish, and Italian. A Super 
Vocabulary course, a Super Memory 
course, and a Speed Reading course. 




Creativity Booster, Quick Energxj, 
Stress Zapper, Brain Tune-Up, Virtual 
Visualization, Imagination Stimulator, 
Learning Accelerator, Super Intuition, 
Lucid Dreaming, and Super Zen States. 

A $150 value, this extensive collec- 
tion of mind expansion experiences is a 
super bonus. But what's even 
more exciting is how this same 
machine can be used for habit 
control, success conditioning, 
and eliminating self-defeating 
attitudes. 

Zap Your Mind 
With Success 

Let's say you want to transform 
a loser mind-set into a winning 
one. Or you'd like to quit smok- 
ing or lose weight. Pop in an 
InnerMind ' Programming Disc. 
The light-sound matrix opens a 
window into your unconscious 
mind — the source of your 
inner programming. 

Then by infusing your 
"inner mind" with new positive 
programs, you can rescript neg- 
ative self-defeating behavior. 
I'm including with your 
Learning Machine kit 18 exquis- 



itely produced InnerMind programs. 
From success conditioning to weight 
control, this is another $150 value. 

$200 Instant Rebate 

In addition to the Accelerated 
Interactive Language Learning Library, 
the SuperPhonics, Super Speed 
Reading, Super Memory, and Super 
Vocabulary programs, the Mind Sync 
Library, and the InnerMind Pro- 
gramming Library (a $600 combined 
value), I'm going to offer you a one-time 
$200 instant rebate off the list price of 
the Learning Machine. I figure you'll be 
so impressed with this incredible tech- 
nology you'll use that extra $200 to buy 
additional Learning Discs. 

The list price for the Learning Machine 
is $499.95. But as I said I'm letting you 
have it (limited time offer) for $299.95 
plus shipping. And remember, in addi- 
tion to the $200 rebate, I'm including 
hundreds of dollars worth of free 
Learning Discs, making this an incredi- 
ble opportunity. 

30-Day Risk Free Trial 

Try the Learning Machine risk free for 30 
days. During your risk free trial sample 
4 languages, triple your reading speed, 
boost your vocabulary, improve your 
memory, and reprogram one or two bad 
habits. Now imagine what you can do 
during the second month. But hurry. 
This is a limited introductory offer, so 
please reserve your order now. 

To order, simply call my toll free 
number. Or send your check or money 
order for $299.95 plus $12 shipping & 
handling to the address below. Please 
allow 4-6 weeks for delivery. 

Learning Machine Special Offer 
Item #4502 S299.95f22.00] 

Need a CD Player? We have an 
excellent portable — at a great price! 

Portable CD Player 

Item # 91021 $129.95(9.001 

FOR FASTEST SERVICE ORDER TOLL FREE 

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ZYGON 

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For information please call (206) 885-920(1 

Fax orders to (206) 882-1454 



" 1994 Zyfjon hiema: :'.":'. ir.:. At[ R.fthts Reserved. Lest 



g Maim, SMpcfP"rcn:;s. The Tea:*-.er. 3-D M.rJ Syr:, A:cc!urflea !-*.• - 

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:"..:'• Langua^? Speed Lea'r rg are ''--o'vfcs of Z>f;;n ' •■■■•--. 



ideo Training for Windows Applications 



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N MINUTES 



Video Training Specialist 






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MS Excel Specialist Certified WordPerfect Trainer MS Certified, Visual Basic 

8 MS Project Instructor £ WordPerfect SiX,£) (nsmiclor Developer and Trainer 




Wen) 6.0 8eg/lnl/Adv $49.95ea 
Special-Any Two Videos $89.95 
Special-All Three Videos $129.95 



Quattjo Pro 5.0 Beg/litt/Adv $49.95ea 



Average 90-120 minutes 
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Excel 5.0 Beg/int/Ariv 

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Access Beg/lnt/Adv S49.95ea 

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DOS & Windows Basics 
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Ask about Special Video Combinations 
Microsoft Office (7 VKfeos} $299.95 
Microsoft Office Pro (12 Vfen) $495.95 
Microsoft Office Plus (14 tUw) $579.95 

Borland Office (9 Videos) $349.95 

Borland Office Lite (6 Videos} $239.95 



■my tad 



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Publisher's Paradise Professional CD-ROM 

High-Quality Clip Art and Fo nts for Documents That Get Noticed 

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VGA pictures 
Adult Ref. Lib. S35 
Amateur Models S40 
American Girls $40 
Busty Babes #2 $40 
Digital Dreams #2 S36 
High Vol. Nudes $40 
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Southern Beauties S40 
Super Smutwaie $36 
The Marie of Zara $48 



Adult CD-ROM 



Misc. 

Adult Movie 

Almanac $62 

Bare Assets $60 

ErotiCafe $60 

L.A. Strippers $48 

Paradise Club $50 
and more titles... 



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510-736-4376 Voice - 510-736-8397 Fax 



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Circle Reader Service Number 182 



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6 QOQ fonts ! pendragon 

Software Library 



2500 TrueType, 2500 Type 1 
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m 3000 FONTS 



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216-951-9241 Fax- For faster service 



Circle Reader Service Number 134 



Public Domain/Shareware for 

IBM & Compatibles 

ASP Member 

No Viruses * Latest Versions 

Over 2500 Programs 

FREE 80 page Catalog 

We also carry CD-ROM discs 

Premier Shareware CD - 1 Gig - $24.00 
Desktop Publishers Dream Disk + Book 
650 Megs of Fonts and Clipart - $36.00 

PO Box 56 
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Circle Reader Service Number 235 







THREE GATES . . . skryeing, aware- 
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MAGIC MIRROR . . . toolbox for your 
mind. Ernest Kinnie, PhD, $39.95. 

VISUALIZATIONS . . . visualizing, re- 
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PHOENIX FIRE . . . high-tech Ouija |@ 
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MAGIC MOUNTAIN . . . weird adven- 
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Blue Valley, 29 Shepard St.. Walton. NY 13856 
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Circle Reader Service Number 173 



if 



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Maclnker 

Eliminate ribbon costs. Re- 
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Epson Maclnker 49.95 

Universal Cartridge Maclnker 79.95 

Call for comprehensive catalog! 

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14250 NW Science Park Drive 
Portland, OR 97229 

Order 1-800-547-3303 

Tel. (503) 626-2291 
Fax (503) 643-5379 




Circle Reader Service Number 225 



They'll never 
know you're 



Appearance 





Reality. 

Introducing SuiteTalker y our revolutionary mini 
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Circle Reader Service Number 131 



FREE! 

Download the HOTTEST & SEXIEST Images 
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Teacher's Tro* 

Beyond the Wail of Stars Sl5 Fatly Bear's Bday Surprise . 

C.H.A.O.S. Continuum $21 Fatty Bears FLn Pack S19 

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Comanche- Max Oveffe] $59 Janes in the Fast Lane $16 



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Conspracy $45 Learn at Home-Berensta : n Brs $29 



. $29 Macm, ( lan Diet for Chc'-en ... $24 

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Daemcnsgcfe .. 

Dagger of AmonRA . 
Day of the Tentacle .. 

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Ecoquest - Search for Cetus . $ 1 9 Pat-PuTt Jains the Po'ade . 



$21 



. $34 TcrTse&Thehkre $35 

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Eye of the Beholder I 

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GaboeiKnight 

Gunsh'p 2003 w/scenanos 

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Mage Death-Vrtuat Murder $19 GraLers Mult Encyciop 6.0 ... $35 



$55 Animals (San Diego Zoo) $19 

$37 AudabonsB'rds $16 

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$15 Comptons interactive End ... $49 

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Mantis 

Mario is Missing (Deluxe) 

Maocosm 

MYST 

Rebel Assault 

Return to Zork 

Secret a' Markey Island . 
Secret Weapons of the Lutt 



SpaceQuestrv $15 

Star Trek -25th Anniversary . $59 Oceans Below 



$15 Guiness Disc ar Records $21 

$19 Languages af the World $19 

. S44 Votutk:Is- National Geo $24 

$54 MavisTeachesTyping2.0 .... $19 

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$25 Microsoft Bookshelf $39 

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. $19 MPCWizard2 $16 

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StarWarsChess $19 

Stelia' 7 $15 

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Untima Underworld I and II ... $34 

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Who ShaT Johnny Rock $Car Space Shuffle 

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Porenfng - Prenatal to Prescl $21 
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Circle Reader Service Number 204 



SOFTWARE SUPPORT INTERNATIONAL 

Your Reliable Source of IBM/PC CD-ROM Software At Rock-Bottom Prices! 



GAMES 

7th Guest 

Battlechess Enhanced 

Deathstar Arcade Battles 

F-15 Strike Eagle 3 

Game Master V3 

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Hugo's House of Horrors 

King's Quest 5 

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Puzzelmania 

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Education Master V2 $17.95 

Encyclopedia V5.0 (DOS) $37.95 

Encyclopedia V6.0 (WIN) $35.95 

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Language Discovery $27.95 

Mammals $20.95 

Mavis Beacon Typing V2 519.95 

Our Solar System $12.95 

Colossal Cookbook 512.95 

Computer Reference Library . 512.95 

Cookbook Heaven 515.95 

Dictionaries & Languages 512.95 

Family Doctor $20.95 

Gardening 512.95 

Guinness Records 1993 S 14.95 

Hacker Chronicles 525.95 

Mavo Clinic 519.95 

Power-Talk 518.95 

Pro Phone 1993 - 4th Quarter ... 568.95 

Sci-Fi Fantasy 520.95 

Sherlock Holmes Books 5 12.95 

Time Almanac/ 1990 514.95 

Totla Baseball 1993 Edition ... 518.95 
World of Trains 524.95 

PUBLISHING 

Clipart Galore 523.95 

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Desktop Pub Dream Disk S25.95 

Gifs Galore 518.95 



Publish It 20 514.95 

Publishers Paradise $19.95 

Publishers Paradise Pro 534.95 

Too Many Typefonts $12.95 

PROGRAMMING 

Encyclopedia of Sound $12.95 

Sound Sensations $12.95 



Aloha Hawaii! 514.95 

Global Explorer $92.95 

Precision Mapping $69.95 

Sophisticated Santa Fe $ 14.95 

WINDOWS 

CICA Microsoft Windows $15.95 

Windoware 512.95 

Windows 1993 $20.95 

Windows Master S17.95 

Winplatinum 515.95 

RELIGION 

Bible Librarv $24.95 

Bibles & Religion $12.95 

Holy Bible & Christian SW ....$18.95 

MISCELLANEOUS 

CD Caddies $ 5.95 

Ham Radio 512.95 

Midi Music Shop for Windows .517.95 

Night Owl V10 S29.95 

PC Sig Library V13 522.95 



Shareware 1993 $20.95 

Shareware Explorer (4 CD's) 539.95 

Shareware Overload Trio 519.95 

So Much Screenware 523.95 

So Much Shareware 3 $23.95 

Tempra Access 512.95 

VGA Spectrum 2 5 16.95 



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After Dark Trilogy - XXX 529.95 

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Debbie Does Dallas - XXX .... 529.95 

Deep Throat - XXX 529.95 

Giffy Gold - XXX 524.95 

Hidden Obsessions - XXX 539.95 

Lovely Ladies 2 - XXX $25.95 

Nova Collection VI - XXX .... $24.95 
Nova Collection V2 - XXX .... $24.95 

Wicked W/Kodak -XXX 539.95 

Rimfire Pacific - XXX $29.95 

Super Smutware - XXX 521.95 

Swimware 1993 - XXX 520.95 

Traci, I Love You - XXX $29.95 

Tropical Girls - XXX $21.95 

Women of Venus -XXX $20.95 



USA & CANADA 

CALL TOLL 

FREE TODAY? 



1-800-356-1179 

Major Credit Cards Accepted 



U.S. residents of 48 States - add S5.50 per order for ground 
shipping. All others may call for shipping costs. Call or write 
for our latest free catalog . Software Support International 
2700 N.E. Andresen Rd. #A-10 Vancouver Wa, 98661 



Circle Reader Service Number 210 



Make Money With A Computer 



Own a lifetime license for a patent to make a 
product that will please adults, delight and educate 
children, and return high profits on a minimal 
investment. That's the sure-fire success formula that Best 
Personalized Books, Inc. offers to distributors who are 
building strong, easy to run, highly profitable businesses. 

As the leader in the industry Best Personalized Books, Inc. is 
partners with such high profile companies as Walt Disney 
for their all time favorite Disney characters, Mattel Toys 
for Barbie, Warner Brothers for Bugs Bunny and the 
Looney Tunes and the National Football League for the 
Super Bowl and NFL teams and logos. 

By teaming up with these world renown companies, 
Best Personalized Books, Inc. makes it possible to produce 
products with name recognition that almost sell themselves. 



Personalized books are instant favorites because the 
child is the star of each story. An extensive array of titles 
appeals to a wide range of ages and tastes and includes 
well-written stories on religious and ethnic themes that 
reinforce family values. 

No computer experience is necessary to create a 
personalized book. With Best's strong marketing program, 
you'll find selling options are limitless. You can run a 
profitable mail order business from home, set up on 
location at malls, craft fairs and flea markets, or team- up 
with fund-raising groups to promote literacy. 

Strong dealer support is a priority^ To help you make 
even bigger profits, Best ofters other personalized products 
including docks, audio cassette tapes, birth announcements, 
calendars and stationery for teens and adults. 




For A 5ma/f Investment, Start A Business Creat/nj Personalized looks 



Best Personalized Books, Inc <»"> »?■"•• . 

Best Plaxa • 4201 Airborn • Dallas, TX 75248 FREE 000 K cMd Kit 

Aladdin, Mickey Mouse, NFL Super Bowl, NFL Teams and Logos, Daffy Duck, Yosemite Sam, 
Sylvester, Tweety, Porky Pig, Donald Duck, Goofy, Pluto, Winnie the Pooh, Barbie, Bugs 
Bunny and The Looney Tunes are trademarked properties. The president of Best Personalized 
Books, Inc. owns US Patent 5,213,461 to produce personalized books with a computer. 



"" Learn , n 
Computers! 

Home study. 
Learn the per- 
sonal compu- 
ter for a better 
career and an 
easier home 
life. Exciting, 
easy to follow. 
Free booklet. 

Call 800-223-4542 

The School of 
Computer Training 

6065 Rosewell Road 
Dept. KG68002, Atlanta, GA 30328 




* SIGNS AND 
>*> RUBB6R STRMPS 

for your own use or a 
profitable sideline business 



Self-Inking and traditional 

knob handle stamps can 

be made for less tnan $1. 

Retail prices will start in 

the $10+ range. 




Informational signs, nameplates, 

control panels, name badges, 

and hundreds of other signage 

items can be made for pennies 

per square inch. 




Complete systems are less than $2,000 



JACKSON HARKING PRODUCTS CO. INC. 

Brownsville Rd., D-200, Mt. Vernon, IL 62864 
Phone: 800-STAMPCALL Fax: 800-STAMPFAX 



Circle Reader Service Number 231 



SPECIAL RLPOR 



DOLLARS AND SENSE 



Who says there s no such 
thing as easy money? 

j} ince so many of you requested 
information on a solid business 
opportunity, we began to investigate the 
business opportunity marketplace. One 
company that stood out from the crowd 
in so far as a clean track record of 
satisfied distributors and a unique 
product line is located in Bristol. W 

The fun about this opportunity is that you 
can operate it from the convenience of 
your own home. Some distributors 
operate the business just a few hours a 
month while others are operating full 
time. However, they all have one thing in 
common, and that is the ease in which 
sales are made because of the products 
broad appeal. 

Consumers everywhere realize the need 
for sensible products and/or services. 
Distributors profit by filling those needs. 
What really impressed us was the fact 
they only allow 2 active distributors in 
each telephone area code, so as not to 
create competition between distributors. 
When dealing with this company you 
will get the straight facts with no 
runaround If you're currently in search 
of a Golden opportunity don't let this one 
pass you by. The minimum investment is 
only $299 plus SS-H. 

Even if you have never sold anything 
before, or don't like sales, you could be a 
great success from the start because the 
services are so well accepted by the 
public. Best of all depending upon which 
distributorship package you choose you 
will receive TV commercials, stand up 
displays, color brochures, radio 
commercials and a Confidential Stategies 
Report. The report is packed with sample 
mail order ads, telemarketing scripts, 
direct mail cards and much more. In 
addition, you may call upon the company 
for help and assistance as often as 
needed. 

Order their Free Starter Kit and 
Judge for yourself. 

1-800-582-1653 

If you cant make $200,000 
your first six months with this 
opportunity \ perhaps you 
should think again about 
starting your own business' 




Business Advisory Council 
\blume No. 342W-A 



COLOR RIBBONS & PAPER 



COLORS: BUCK, RED, BLUE. GREEN. BROWN, PURPLE, YELLOW 



Ribbons Price/Each Black Color 

Brother 11 09 $5.50 $6.50 

Citizen GSX1 40/240, 4-CLR $4.00 $10.00 

Epson MX-80 $3.25 $7.50 

Epson LQ 500/870 $4.50 $7.50 

Okidata 182/1 92 $4.00 $7.50 

Panasonic 1180/1124 $4.25 $7.50 

Panasonic KXP2123 4-CLR $6.50 $12.50 

Star NX1000 4-CLR $3.50 $6.25 

Star NX1 020 4-CLR $6.00 $11.50 

Star NX2420 4-CLR $6.00 $1 2.50 



T-Shlrt 

$7.50 

$15.00 

$6.75 

$7.75 



$15.00 
$10.00 
$15.00 
$15.00 



COLOR USffl TONER/COLOR INK JET REFILLS 



COLOR PAPER: 200 shts/ bright pk. $11.90 

PASTEL PK. $7.90 BANNER PAPER 45 FT. RL $10.95 



DESIGN YOUR OWN 

•HEAT TRANSFER RIBBONS/ 
LASER TONER 

•TRANSFER PAPER FOR 
DOT MATRIX/INK JET/ 
LASER PRINTERS 
Min. Orders $25.00, Min. S&H $6.00, Prices subject to change! 



CUSTOM T-SHIRT, 



RAMCO COMPUTER SUPPLIES 

P.O. Box 475, Manteno, IL 800-522-6922 or 815-468-8081 



Circle Reader Service Number 138 



Copies of articles from 
this publication are now 
available from UMI 
Article Clearinghouse. 

UMI 

A Bell & Howell Company 
300 North Zeeb Road 
Ann Arbor, Ml 48106 USA 



FREE 486 Computer 
Color Monitor, Printer 

You can earn $2,000 to $10,000 per month from 
your kitchen table providing needed services for 
your community. Computer Business Services 
needs individuals to run a computer from their 
home. If you purchase our software, we will give 
you a FREE 486 computer, VGA color monitor, 
120 meg hard drive and a printer. If you already 
have a computer, we will give you a discount. The 
industrial revolution is over but the service revo- 
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offices all over the U.S., we are showing individu- 
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letting everyone involved in this service revolu- 
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success rate is the talk of the computer industry. Call or write for a free 3 hour 
cassette tape and color literature and find out how easy it can be for you to 
earn money in your spare time and help your community. Begin part-time and 
still retain the security of your present position. 

Call toll-free: 

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(in Indiana: 317-758-4415) Fax to: (317) 758-5827 Or Write: 
Computer Business Services, Inc., CBSI Plaza, Ste. 303, Sheridan, IN 46069 




FREE CBSI 486 Computer 



PERSONALIZED 
CHILDREN'S ROOKS 




Vet? &tyt 7*tofit 



With our process and a computer you can instantly produce the highest 

quality personalized children's books and stationery on the market 

today. 

All books are hardbound with full color illustrations and laser quality 

printing. Ideally suited for home based business, malls, department 

stores, fairs or mail order. 

Very simple to operate and highly profitable. 

Only a limited number of dealerships available. 



For a complete information packet call today. 

(214) 248-9100 

D&K ENTERPRISES, INC. • 3216 COMMANDER DRIVE 
SUITE 101 • DEPT 27 • CARROLLTON, TEXAS 75006 



BABYDOC 

On call for your child 24 hours a day 







Software to keep children healthy 



Record 

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Insurance Info. 
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Print 

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IBM Compatible 



Immunization 
Growth 
Development 
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Diagnose 

500 Diseases 

Read up on 

300 Diseases 
700 Medications 

BABYDOC 

(Dealer in qui ri es welcome; 



PO Box 26 1 80 Fresno, CA 93729-6 1 80 / 800 NICE KID / 800 642 3543 



Circle Reader Service Number 166 



SeXXy Software 



SeXXv DISKS 



SeXXcapades- . . . The GAME 

The First Adult Game with TRUE SOUND 

and 256 Color VGA Graphics 

The game everyone has been wailing (or. For that evening you wont forget wtih a loved one or group ot very close friends. Furtill your sexual 
desires. Find our how your partner would really like to make love. I Over 80 Color VGA Scenes • Real Voices Guide the Action • Foreplay Option • 
Play with 2-8 Close Friends. Now supports SoundBlaster™ cards! Reg, price $79. VGA and hard disk required ■ shipped on high density disks. 



SeXXy Software 



SeXXv CD-ROMS 



SUPER CD-ROM SALE 

All CD-ROMS: $69 each or 3 for $149 



CONNOISSEUR COLLECTION ALL NEW! In 256 Color VGA!! 

ALL movies have sound - play thru standard speaker or SoundBlaster™ 
SeXXy Disk #CC1 • • VOU BE THE STAR *The FIRST CUSTOMIZABLE movie allows you to write the dialog and the title. 
SeXXy Disk ICC2 • THE FIRST SOUND MOVIE! The first computer movie with SOUND. See the incredible 256 color VGA graphics while 

hearing the actual dialog. OURS EXCLUSIVELY! 
SeXXy Disk #CC3 • THE BEST MOVIE! The best computer movie available. Only for the serious collector. 256 stunning VGA colors. 
SeXXy Disk «CC4 • VOLUPTUOUS MDVIE with Sound! See and hear a symphony of exceptionally proportioned women. 
SeXXy Disk #CC5 • ODDITIES MOVIE wflh Sound! See men of incredible proportions and women with unique abilities - UNBELIEVABLE! 
Prices: 1 Movie $29. 3 Movies S65. 5 Movies $94 



Now You Can Have Your Own GIRLFRIEND 
... a sensuous woman living in your computer! 

GIRLFRIEND b the first VIRTUAL WOMAN. You can watch her. talk to her, ask her questions and relate with her. Over 100 actual VGA pho- 
tographs allow you to see your girlfriend as you ask her to wear diffrent outfits, and guide her into different sexual activities. As a true artifi- 
cial intelligence program, GIRLFRIEND starts with a 3000 word vocabulary and actually GROWS the more you use it. She will remember 
your name, your birthday an your likes and dislikes. GIRLFRIEND comes with the base software and GIRLFRIEND LISA. Additional girls will 
be added. This program requires 7-10MB of free space. 

SG3 GIRLFRIEND - Special Introductory Price $69. FREE - Second GIRLFRIEND Just Added. 

NEW! SG7 GIRLFRIEND TERI - 300+ PICTURES Price $79. 



ORIGINAL SeXXy DISKS™ - 6 disk set with movies, pictures, games $32 



ADD $4 S'H • 3.5" Or FOREIGN ORDERS ADD $2>DISK • IN PA ADD TAX ■ MUST STATE AGE OVER 21 YEARS. 

VISA/MC Orders Only: 800-243-1515 Ext. 600FR i 24HRS i 7 DAYS 

FAX (215)997-2571 • Or CK/MO to: Sexy Software, P.O. Box 220, Dept. 600FR, Hatfield. PA 19440 



LIMITED UFFEH-MAYBt WIIHLIHAWN A 



HMb Kbb. $99 EACH OH 3 rQH 5199. 



SeXXy FLIX 

Full Length Digital Movies - Ours Exclusively! 
KING DONG - The dirtiest dinosaur movie ever made - CRYSTAL HOLLAND stars with prehistoric 

monsters, cannibals, and lots of special effects. 
TOO NAUGHTY TO SAY NO - HARRY REEMS and GINGER LYNN star in an erotic daydream 

in a boarding school for girls - from CABALLERO HOME VIDEO, dir. SUZE RANDALL. 
SEX GAMES - When a hacker taps into a computer dating service he is able to program the 

wildest fantasies of its sexiest member - SHAUNA GRANT stars. 
SeXXcapades . . . The MOVIE - See incredible uses of a mouse and a joystick as a group of 

friends play our popular SeXXcapades game. 

NO HARD DISK SPACE REQUIRED - WINDOWS NOT REQUIRED 



SeXXy CD-ROMS 

Sexy CD #1 the premiere adult XXX collection - 650 MB of action with over 2500 VGA pictures, sto- 
ries, cartoons, games, sound files. DARE TO COMPARE! 

Sexy CD 12 an exclusive collection containing over 1000 Super VGA pictures (1024 x 766 x 256) 
and over 30D MB of true 24 hit color These are pictures that cannot be found anywhere else! The 
women and the quality are stunning 

Sexy CO #3 another collection of over 650 MB of the hottest pictures available. Over 3,000 VGA pic- 
tures, movies and utilities that will have you spending days just trying to see it all! 

MENU DRIVEN VIEWING - NO DUPLICATION 



MIX & MATCH CD-ROMS / SeXXy PIX™ 

CDLLEGE GIRLS, DOORS OF PASSION, PINCH OF PEPPER, 3D DREAMGIRLS, DREAM MACHINE. TRACI I 

LOVE YOU, SEYMDUR 8UTTS, WICKED WHISPERS, BODACIOUS BEAUTIES, NORTHERN DELIGHTS 1 & 2, 

SIZZLE. WOMEN ON WHEELS , DEEP THROAT, DEBBIE DOES DALLAS, ASIAN LADIES, HOT PIX 2, 3, 4, 5, 

EXOTIC GIRLS, TROPICAL GIRLS, DIGITAL DREAMS, PRINCESS OF PERSIA 



BIZARRE, EXOTIC 
FANTASIES??? 

D&S 

Discussions on Alternate Life-styles. 

Fetish Material, Digitized Photographs, 

Chat, Original Fetish Art and Much More! 

Nationally Echoed Conferences, AfterDark 

and ThrobNet. International Conferences 

and Mail through Internet. 

(310)631-7697 

HEDONISM 
BBS 

/ / *, N, J \ \ 

1,200 -16,800 Baud 

AMEX-VISA 
MC DISCOVER h 

A Computerized Bulletin Board Operated as a Service 

to Lovers of the Hedonist Life-style 

ADULTS ONLY PLEASE 



Games Too Expensive ? 

Consider Pre-owned Software 



• Save big $$$ over new 

• Original disks and manuals 

• IBM - AMIGA - C64 

• Hard-to-find classics plus 
all the latest releases 

• Call or write for free catalog 
(specify computer) 



940 4th Ave #222 Huntington WV 25701 

1-800-638-1123 

Customer Service: 304-529-0461 
BBS for complete list: 304-529-7050 



Circle Reader Service Number 113 



Circle Reader Service Number 116 



FREE Catalog! I CLOSEOUTS 



IBM/MS-DOS: 



Call 1-800-86Z-2457 
For FREE CD-ROM Catalog 

Iron Helix $59 

Nightowl 1 1 $39 

Rebel Assult $46 

Sissors N Stones $49 

Many Titles In Stock! 

Adult Titles Available 

UNI-ROM 

5694 Mission Ctr. #449,San Diego, CA 92108 



(619)279-1139 
FAX (619)279-8543 



33Ef?7M*I4'lr#?*fti 



ItlS 

i no 
>ts iiTttwrcmcs 
■ffwnraiiMnRts 
iHOUUtswnmoipntio 

MKBTTBIilQinHHMSK 
UUDDEBDBnSBIBUTnS 

turbo hiloss quaaio 115 
unno vmmwmmm 



KING'S QUEST 1.2,3 or 4, HEART OF. 

CHINA, RISE OF THE DRAGON, 

LEISURE SUIT LARRY 1,2 or 3, 

ZELIARD, POLICE QUEST 1, 

QUEST FOR GLORY lor 2, 

SPACE QUEST 1.2 a 3. 



^ 



■••riti- fe-i 
W FOR VICTORY: 
GOLD/JUNO/SWORD 



m 



MICROPROS! BUNDLE $35 
M-I TANK PLATOON 
SILENT SERVICE 2 
F-19 STEALTH FIGHTER 



SIERRA 1 10 SPECIALS 

CAMELOT, POLICE QUEST 2, 
r- COLONEL'S BEQUEST. 



THREE-SIXTY WAR GAMES 
$20 each. 3 or more $15 each 



V for VICTORY: 

Russian Front, Utah BmcJi 



MEGAFORTRKS MEGA-FAX, 
HARPOON SIGNATURE PAK, 
BLUE MAI THEATRE OF WAR, 
PATRIOT, DAS BOOT. j 



CREDIT CARD ORDERS 
S25 MINIMUM. 

1-800-676-6616 

Orders Only, pleasetl 



COMPSULT 

P.O. BOX 5160 
SAN LUIS OBISPO, CA 93403 



WE ALSO CARRY APPLE. MAC. C64/128, AMIGA, ATARI & MORE 

To order, send check or money order to the above address. California orders 
must include 7.25% sales tax. All orders must include shipping charges of 
$6 for U.S.A., $8 for Canada, or $15 for International. For our complete 
catalog send $2 in U.S. postage stamps or cash. A catalog is sent FREE with 
any order. Be sure to specify your disk size when ordering. 
" ndaitional information, call (805) Si 



For all 



544-88 IB. 



Circle Reader Service Number 190 



Your name here 
Your address 



Over_LAZ 

Custom Letterheads 

Print your own letterhead from 
WordPerfect 5.x, WordStar, PC-Write, 
dBase. X/-tVf/te(and other programs) 
automatically on your HP LaserJet or 
PostScript printer. Wide variety of fonts 
and styles to choose from. We can 
also add your corporate logo at no 
extra cost. Includes over 100Over_LAZ 
printer overlay office forms, 'rubber 
stamps' and page borders. Call, write 
or FAX for details. 

Only $25 (US), $29 (CDN), + $2 p&h. 
Check, money order or VISA. 

Heme Data Systems Ltd., Box 250 
Tiverton, ON, CANADA, NOG 2T0 

Voice or FAX (519) 366-2732 



Circle Reader Service Number 250 



PENTHOUSE 
0*N*L*l*N*E 



THE BEST OF PENTHOUSE 
AND MORE! 

• Sizzling GIFs of Pets, 
Lovesets, More 

• Hot Live Chat 

• Fast "photo preview" 

• Highest Quality Files 

• 9600/VGA 

• Penthouse, Variations 
Letters 

• "Photo Email" 

• Local call from most 
areas 

• Affordable rates 

For Modem signup call 1-619-546-2364 
(8-N-1) Info: 1-619-546-2360 

21 or older only 



Circle Reader Service Number 217 



Mega Demo & Test \, 
contains 350 Megs 
of PC Shareware & PD 
software. Including Special 
CD-ROM Benchmark and Test Utilities 
written by our programming staff, & NOT 
available on any other CD-ROM Discs. Our 
Special Test Utilities measure throughput 
as well as access time in a reliable and 
consistent manner for a meaningful 
real-world benchmark for CD drives. 
The Disc and Interface Software are x 
fully functional (Even for BBS Use) and ^ 
not crippled in any way. When purchased 
separately Mega Demo and Test is $14.00 
plus $6.00 for S&H However for a Limited 
Time This Demo and Test CD-ROM Disc 
is Free with any CD Disc purchase. 

These are the Only Shareware & PD 

CD-ROM Discs with both a DOS, 

and a Windows 3,1 "Hypertext" 

Retrieval Interface. Plus All CD 

Discs are BBS Ready, and Include 

files. bbs plus our BBS Door with 

"Remote User" Mouseable 

Pull-Down Menu Interface. 

PROFIT PRESS, 824 E. Ft. Lowell, 
Tucson, AZ 85719 - Info (602) 770-0000 
FAX (602) 770-0005 - BBS (602) 770-0008 



■ilOi'il >J\VA 



i New! JUST RELEASED! New! JS£- m 



/ J^CD„-R0M 3 ^Windowsi Barnes 



Genuine 

SONY 

Caddies $3.50 

each with 
ANY $49.00 

CD-ROM 
Disc Purchase 

Limit of 10 
Per Customer 



PC Shareware Speciacular 

Megs 1 Plus Qgs Uncompressed! 
i Our Newest in The Mega CO-ROM 
I Series. Curtate IMfes of Al Types, 
f Word Processors, DaJa Base, 
Cornmtrications, Graphics Tools, CAD, 

Busress, Education, Programmmg, 
Hobby, Games, Spans, Sound Fies, 256 
Color GIFs, FUs, Btotes, Forts, Windows 

Programs. BBS, Plus Much More 1 



Publisher 
Direct Price 



Our Newest in the Mega Windows Series. 

This Disc Contains Windows Utites of A* 

Types, Wrctows Appication Programs of 
Al Types. Windows Comrnunicalions 
Programs, Windows Games, Windows 

Fonts, Windows 256 Color Graphics .BMP, 
Windows Sound Fies WAV, Windows 

Drivers and teens, plus OS/2 Shareware, 
and Much Much More! 



PCGarw.&aphesSSouKi5 

Cortans PC Games from Shareware 
Companies such as Apogee, and Epic, 

plus many many others. Game Bytes 
Electronic Magazne. with We categories 
thai rdude Arcade, Adventure, Puzzles, 

Mtid& Strategy, War Games. Card 

Games, Fre Games, Plus 256 Color 

GIFs, FLTs of al types A Includes Sound 

Fies, MX), ROL.WAV&.VOC 



$29.00 ea. 



Or All 3 New Mega Fantastic CRQ fin 
MEGA CD-ROM Discs for Only! ^3 3 - UU 




best 
utst 



Ths Disc Contains Harjqng, Phreaking, Tone Box Halation, Anarchy, 
StiniLie. Mage, Hand & CompJer Socunty Secrets, Bomb Plans, 
FBI&PobeNaFtes,VnjeCode, Sck& Twisted Graprts, UFO. 
Ocni, Ben Ham Flado Res, FVb tfafr tAxt\ toe! Everything Fun 
and Interesang Tra AbscUery No One Wart You c Know Ata* 
£fes MegaSearch for those Fasctethg Lae N01 Tert Searches. & 
(if You Darej far B8S rhere's Ses.bbs Rls MegaDocr and MepaTerrrinai. 



OurExctusfre! 
Special Price 

$39.00 

S.H.P.$79JDea. 



****"? I 




ORDERS ONLY! CALL TOLL FREE 

1-800-843-7990 




Volumes 1,2, & 3 
" Best of the Best * 

Fc'Ad.TsOrV GOLD 

"Wife Prrjot Labefe 
Eacti &*r 600 Me^eyss 
Many Net On FA0 123 - 256 Color SVGA 
Gifs with NO BBS Logosi Plus Animated 
fl-l's, GL/s, & DL/s, Includes Games, and 
Farasy Text Files S.R.P S79.00 each. 



For Adults Crly 

■Wife Proof LaWsT 
256 Colo: SVGA GIFs, 
HusArinrBtedfLrs. GL's&DL's 
Inci ides Games, & Fantasy Text Files. 
3 Disc Set 1,892 Megs - 16,000+ Files' 
S R.R (or this Set of 3 Discs SI 99.00. 



Circle Reader Service Number 224 







Single white female 
seeks companionship! 

GIRLFRIEND TERI is the 3rd Every conversation is differ- 
in our series of Artificially Intel li- ent as she 1 earns from you. 
gent Virtual Women. You are on This is true Al.. not a multiple 
a date... what do you want to do? choice mouse game! Now at 
What do you want to talk about? your favorite software source 
She isn't shy - parental guidance or directly from AldeaLabs. 
is suggested. Not recommended $69.95 plus $4 S&H. Specify 
for minors due to subject matter! diskette format, 
AldeaLabs, Inc., 709 Lingco #106, Dcpt C394, Richardson, TX 75081 
(214)235-4999 Fax (214)235-4992 CompuServe: 71334,1 136 
IBM PC, VGA, 13MBforPG-13. Ask about Adult versions' 



FREE 

ADULT CD-ROM 



I want to send you a FREE* Adult 
CD-Rom that features: 

• Gorgeous Centerfold Models 

• Excerpts from REG's Current Adult Titles 

• Quality Photographic Images & Color Scans 

• An Easy to Use Interactive Windows Program 

* AH we ask is that you send $4.95 to cover our 

postage and handling. 

To receive your FREE* Adult Cd-Rom, state age 

when ordering and mail your request with $4.95 for 

postageVhandling (Outside of U.S. & Canada $15) to: 

REG Publishing - Dept. GM1 

Post Office Box 5138, Chatsworth, CA 91313 

To order by telephone call (818) 993-5629. We accept Visa, 
MasterCard & AMX. Program requires Windows 3.1. 
Will work with Dos & Mac viewing programs, too! Dealer 
inquiries invited. Adults Only! Ask for our Color Catalog. 

REG's current Adult Titles are: "Centerfolds on Disc" 
Volumes 1 & 2 and its newest release "LOVERS" - 
Volume 1. Each CD-Rom is $49.95. Save $10 - Buy 2 for 
$89.95. Save $25.00 - Buy all 3 CD-Roms for $124.95. 



Circle Reader Service Number 198 



Circle Reader Service Number 127 



WIN LOTTO! 

GAIL HOWARD'S 

SMART LUCK 3 LOTTERY SYSTEMS 



Won 39 Lotto jackpots 
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USE THIS SYSTEM AND YOU WILL TRASH 
ALL YOUR OTHER LOTTERY SOFTWARE! 



A PROVfN WINNER! ■ DONT SETTLE FOR LESS. 

mm 1-800-87-6-4245 ** 
SMART LUCK* SOFTWARE 

Dept. C-12. P.O. Box 1519 • White Plains. NY 10602 
l-gOO-876-GAIL (4245) or 914-761-2333 , 

Circle Reader Service Number 109 



Ready . . . for our extensive 

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Fort Worth, Texas 76133 



EDUCATIONAL 

SOFTWARE 

INTERACTIVE SIGN LANGUAGE 

Leam how to sign with this program that teaches you 
fingerspelling and numbers, win $79 

FINANCIAL COMPETENCE 

Increase your understanding of financial statements 
and improve your financial performance, win/mac $89 

HOME MEDICAL ADVISOR 

Developed by a team of doctors, information on 
health, injuries, symptoms, drugs, win/dos/cd $59 

PROFESSOR WINDOWS 

Leam the most popular operating system for the PC 
with this comprehensive tutorial, win $33 

Order Now 1-800-95-ORION 

Call for our complete catalog! 

Orion Business International, Inc. 

4455 Torrance Blvd. Ste. 555D 

Torrance, CA 90503 

Tel. 310-214-4884 Fax. 310-214-9966 



'KEYBOARD 
KETCHUP! 




A great novelty for laughs at home or office! 

Interfaces with most keyboords. Jusl place empty 
ketchup pack (not included) next to the fake spill 
and run for caver! 
Send S2.95 for one, S2.49 for two or more 

to: PIERCE AVIATION 

P.O. Box 110 
Lakeville, IN 46536. 



REMOVE 
HARDWARE LOCKS 



PROTECT YOUR INVESTMENT! 
MAINTAIN PRODUCTIVITY! 

Software utility that allows for 
the removal of hardware locks. 

Available for most major 

CAD/CAM and PCB 

software programs 

Easy - Simple - Guaranteed 
Programs start at $99.00 U.S. 

Visa and Mastercard Welcome 
Call or Fax for more Information 



SafcSoft Systems Inc. 
201-1111 Munroe Ave. 
Winnipeg. Mb. Canada 



PH (204)669-4639 
FAX(204)668-3566 
R2K 3Z5 



Circle Reader Service Number 212 



IBM PC, PCjr 
XT, AT, & 

Tandy users 



Not everyone needs the fastest 
computer money can buy. Run Lotus 
1-2-3, WordPerfect, dBase, and most 
other software without buying a new 
computer! We specialize in hardware 
products that allow older computers to 
run the latest software. 

Call for information and free catalog! 

You don't have to buy a new 

Computer to run the Latest 

Software! 



(800) 922-7257 



2400 Belmar Blvd. 
PO Box 292 
Belmar, NJ 07719 

Computer Upgrade Specialists* Since !9H4 



KESESElIi 



Circle Reader Service Number 172 



Circle Reader Service Number 221 



FREE 

IBM & MAC 
SHAREWARE & 
100 CD SOFTWARE 

CATALOG 



SoftShoppe CD $46 Only! 
The Ultimate Shareware Collection 

SoftShoppe 32 Pages! ASP Mergber 
POBOX 4437 
CERRITOS, CA 90703 
TEL: (310)802-1333 
FAX: (310)802-1494 



1-800-851-8089 



Circle Reader Service Number 126 




! ATTENTION ! 
GAME DEVELOPERS 

Game Cartridge Emulator 

Connects your PC to 16 bit game machines! 
Makes any PC a video game workstation! 
Loads, Stores, and Runs binary image files! 
Requires IBM PC -XT, AT, 286, 386, or 486; 
MS DOS 3.0 or later; one 8 bit card slot. 

16 Meg bits RAM system $ 245.00 
24 Meg bits RAM system - $ 325.00 

Each system includes one PC "add-on" 
card, one 16 bit game machine adaptor, 
cables, software, and Users Manual. 
Additional game machine adaptors -$40.00 

RHOTECH LABS 

P.O. Box 800727, Dallas, TX 75380 
(214) 692 - 1206 (voice and FAX) 

Hardware does not include any proprietary data on 
game machines, or game development software; not 
licensed and/or endorsed by any game or game 
machine manufacturer. 



100's of CD-Rom 

Titles Available 

Call or Write 

for a Free 

Catalog of 

Great Buys 

DISKS O' PLENTY INC. 

8362 PINES BLVD, SUITE 270 
PEMBROKE PINES, FL 33024 

1-800-963-7750 

1-305-963-7750 



Circle Reader Service Number 129 



Super CD 1, 2, & 3 (3 disk set) 


$50.00 


Super Games for Win. (3 disk set) 


$24.00 


Super Photo Collection 


$35.00 


Super Clipart 


$15.00 


Halo Desktop Imager 


$29.95 


Super Online 


$25.00 


Super Programmer Src Code 


$25.00 


Super Fonts 


$25.00 


CD-Karaoke 


$29.95 


Super Windows Shareware 


$20.00 


MidiSoft Sound Explorer 


$15.00 


Super Waves 


$19.95 


Super W all Paper 


$19.95 


Super Photo Bank 


$20.00 



Groupware 

4826 Tacoma Mall Blvd. 

TacomaAVA 98409 

(800) 373-0628 Office or (800) 277-5179 FAX 



Call for a free catalog 



CD-ROM Drives $130 

Caddies $4.75 
All major credit cards 

accepted 
Many Other Titles & 
CDROM accessories 



FAX (206) 473-1634 Office (206) 472-1400 



Circle Reader Service Number 148 



Work At Home & 
Be Your Own Boss 



Electronic Claims Processing 

"One of the 10 Hottest Businesses for 1994" 
— Entrepreneur Magazine Catalog 




A NEW HIGH INCOME, HOME-BASED 
BUSINESS-PROCESSING HEALTH CLAIMS 

National Claims Service offers the 
most complete package available, 
including a 2 day training seminar, 
video training courses, software and 
a professional start-up package. 
Previous computer or billing experi- 
ence are not required. Health Claims 
Processing has excellent income 
potential, working part or full time. 
Start up from; $3,495 to $7,995. 

For our Free information 
Packet, Caii us Toii Free 



1-800-697-1569 ext. 250 



I NATIONAL CLAIMS SERVICE | 
Circle Reader Service Number 233 



COMPUTE'S 

Product 
Mart 

is a special adver- 
tising section de- 
signed to benefit 
you, the PC direct 
marketer, by let- 
ting you advertise 
directly to the read- 
ers that buy. 

For 

Advertising 

Rates 

Contact 

Lucille Dennis 

707/451-8209 

FAX 
707/451-4269 



Call now to 

reserve 
your space! 




40 PIN 

ZIF 



• Easy to use software, on-line help, 
full sceen editor 

• Made in USA 

• 1 & 2 Year Warranty 

• Technical Support by phone 

• 30 day Money Back Guarantee 
•FREE software upgrades available via BBS 

• Demo SW via BBS (EM20DEMO.EXE) (PB10DEMO.EXE) 

• E(e)proms 2716 - 8 megabit, 16 bit 27210-27240, 27C400 & 27C800, 

• Flash 28F256-28F020, (29C256-29CO10 (EMP-20 only)) 

• Micros 8741 A, 42A, 42AH, 48, 49, 48H, 49H, 55, 87C51 , 87C51 FX, 87C751 ,752 

• GAL, PLD from MS, Lattice. AMD-16V8, 20V8, 22V10 (EMP-20 only) 



FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL 



NEEDHAM'S ELECTRONICS, INC. 

(916) 924-8037 



4630 Beloit Dr 

Suite 20 

Sacramento, CA 95838 

(Monday-Friday, 8am-5pm PST 



C.O.D. 



BBS (916) 924-8094 
FAX (916) 924-8065 



[ffl 



Circle Reader Service Number 191 



oice 
Mail 
Cash 
Machine 



w 



I 



Press 1 for ;i 

sales, 2 for §j 

service, 3 for $ 

live operator 1 



g& _-... -me 

^>y>y^>y>y>y>7>y>y>y^>y>^>y>r 

mm 



JVlake thousands of dollars effortlessly by installing a BigmOuth voice 
package in your286/3S6. Use it to answer your home-office phone, rent 
pocket -pagers, advertise products, or operate a pay-per-call service 
using major credit cards, passwords or a nationwide 900 #. 

I o get started, order our *25 PC Opportunity Toolkit It contains all 
the information you need & its cost is applied to all future purchases. 



A Few Home-Based ventures Featured In Our s 25 Toolkit! 



< BigmOuth 
voice/fax/pager 
rentals 
s 295. (Demo s 25) 



QuickUne 

write programs 

in QBasic 

sj »1 745. (Demo s 25) 



XlientCaller 

outbound 

prospector 

v s 1450.(Demo s 25) 



KinderChek /Rise'n'Shine 



latchkey child 

mom lor 

v s 2250. (Demo s 25) 



iDemoSource" 

The Voice Application Sue 
• ••••••# 



8345 Ftomda Bl. Ste 202 
Northridge.CA 91324 USA 

Trade mark* belong to their publisher* 



wake-up & 

reminder service 

v s 1995. (Demo s 25) 



TollBridge 

sell long 

distance time 

sM995. (Demo s 25) 



TRY 



our demoline! 818 718-9560 



rrstore 



■<S> 



To order, call 24 hours: 
800.283.4759 



~w 



T5T 



Circle Reader Service Number 145 



NEW! NEW! NEW! NEW! 



Limited Time Offer! 



FREE FREE FREE FREE 

Windows Software 

We're giving away 

8 MILLION 

copies of our 
4 different new 
exciting man- 
agement and 
negotiating pro- 
grams to build 
market share. 



Ac SV-^|1 1 



Our Family would like to introduce you to four new outstanding software 
products. These full featured, fully documented Windows programs will save 
time and hundreds and maybe thousands of dollars. Additionally they will make 
your life more manageable and enjoyable. For a limited time we are offering all 
four products FREE. We're betting you'll really like them and want to get future 
upgrades. So read on and then call and order one or all four of these exception- 
al software products and become part of our special Thoughtware family. 
Ernest Hemple, C.E.O., Thoughtware, Inc. 



Intelligent New Car Buyer 



Intelligent 
• \tn- Car "Suy> 



Avoid intimidating car salesmen forever! Intelligent 
New Car Buyer allows you to: 

1 . Choose the exact car, color & options, 

2. Arrange leasing or financing, 

3. Set up a bidding war between new car dealers, 
guaranteeing you the absolute lowest price & best 
warranty on the car of your dreams. 
Without ever leaving your computer! 
Regular price $179.00 Yours Call now! 

When ordering, specify foreign or domestic car version or both. 







< 



Intelligent Computer Buyer 



[ntsiUgeni 
Computer $uyer m 



Looking for a complete system, software package 
new monitor or a bigger, faster hard drive? 
Intelligent Computer Buyer 

allows you to set-up a bidding war between ven- 
dors, guaranteeing you the best price and service. 
Select the exact computer(s). Choose brand, 
speed and size of memory or resolution of every 
component, including CPU, monitor printer and 
software, etc... Specify type and length of support 

and warranty. Save hundreds of dollars on your next computer purchase! 

Regular price S99.00 Yours FREE Call now. 

Fax, mail or phone in bid sheet to your choice of over 250 computer hardware & 
software resellers to guarantee you the best price on any hardware or software 

purchase. Information on resellers include: Type of product or service, address. 




CALL FOR YOUR FREF. COPIES 

1 -800-c -6300 



DEPT. CP 05/94 



Also Great For Businesses 
Kick your sales into high gear! 

i Order Thoughtful Moments for your staff, sales force and clients. 

Use instant Credit to get iow interest rates and no annual fee credit cards. 

Use Intelligent New Car Buyer to save thousands on vehicle fleet purchases. 
4. Use Intelligent Computer Buyer to order multiple systems. Call today and save! 




THOUGHTFUL MOMENTS 



Thoughtful Moments is about people. It's about knowing who they are 
and what they want out of life. It's about making others feel important. 

It's about knowing when to send roses or simply say "We appreciate 
the job your doing". And it's about being able to identify, review and 
respond appropriately and within moments to any event in the lives of 
employees, clients, family and friends. 

Thoughtful Moments is a relationship management program designed 
to help you stay up to date in 9 areas of your personal and business rela- 
tionships. After being prompted of a need and reviewing data on a person, 
Thoughtful Moments allows you to quickly respond with a card, letter or gift. 
It's gift database catalog allows you to fax, mail or 
call toll-free to order products ranging from flowers 
to tropical cruises with just a click of a button. 

Ultimately. Thoughtful Moments is about 
your success. As you focus on the needs of oth- 
ers, they will begin to open doors of opportunity for 
you. For a FREE copy of Thoughtful Moments, a 
powerful relationship manager complete with JUST 
DO IT, a lifetime goal management program. 
Regular price $129.00 Yours Call today! 




Instant Credit 



liisUmt ("nrii! 



$ 



I * 



Credit Repair. Use Instant Credit to automatically 
order free personal credit reports & contest negative 
credit information. Instant Credit follow-up forms will 
insure contested items have been permanently 
removed from your credit file. 
Credit Negotiations: Instant Credit provides forms 
that allow you to negotiate with creditors: 

1. A reduction in debt; 

2. More favorable payment terms; 

3. Full or percentage payment if negative items are removed from credit file. 
Credit Management: Fill out one major credit application and Instant Credit 
automatically fills out over 300 bank, retail, & gas credit card applications. 
Including the leading gold and secured bank credit cards. 
Each application includes: Fax#, 800#, & mailing address, allowing you to fax, 
mail or phone in applications. 

Search the card database by: Current rates, annual fees, geographic area 
or type of card including gold, student, rebate, retail, gas or secured. 

Bonus: Information on how to legally establish a new credit file. Regular 
price $1 19.00. Yours FREE! Call now! 

mail order, travel, education, home improve- 
ments, furnishings, businesses, hobbies, dining, flowers, Christmas, hotels, 
rental cars or just keeping track of financial records. Plus; Save hundreds of 
dollars on interest and credit card fees each year with lower interest rate/no- 
fee credit cards listed in Instant Credit credit card database. Order today! 

S&H rebates: Recieve a $10 certificate good toward future 
upgrades with every free copy ordered to offfset shipping & 
handling cost. Order all 5 software products and receive a 

$100 certificate good toward any future upgrade. 

This is a limited time offer designed to build market 

share and may be withdrawn at any time without notice. 



Thoughtware Inc. 

1 799 X 80 L Omtx ~ 



UT 840o7 



Microsoft 
Windows 
Compatible 

There is a non-refundable S9.95 shipping, handling, and marketing charge for each product or version. Have your credit card ready. When available, 2 day shipping is SI extra. Products may ship togeth- 
er or seperately. Generic applications created by Instant Credit are not accepted by some credit card issuers. Upon request they will send you applications that are acceptable to them. Shipping time will 
range from 2 days to 6 weeks depending on availability. This is a limited offer designed to build market share for each of the products. Intelligent New Car Buyer, Instant Credit, Click and Grow Rich, 
Intelligent Computer Buyer are all trademarks of Thoughtware, Inc, of Utah. All other product names are trademarks of their respective companies. For bundle sales contact Ernie Hemple at 801-224-6825. 
Environmentally responsible packaging. System requirements: Microsoft Windows 3,1, 31/2" Disk. 2Meg RAM, 5MB Available HD Space, 

Circle Reader Service Number 174 



ACCESSORIES 



NEWS & NOTES 

(continued from page 136) 

tuitive plain-English voice commands. 
VoiceCompanion integrates IBM's 
award-winning ICSS command-and- 
control (continuous-speech recognition 
technology), which allows you to 
speak in a normal, continuous stream 
rather than with the distinct pauses re- 
quired by other technologies. The soft- 
ware is scheduled to be in stores the 
second quarter of 1994 for a suggest- 
ed retail price of $295. A sound card is 
required. To find out more, contact Kol- 
vox Communications, 120 Eglinton Av- 
enue East, Suite 1100, Toronto, Ontar- 
io M4P 1E2 Canada; (416) 322-9531, 
(416) 322-7427 (fax). 

Mouse Mitt 

The Mouse Mitt Keyboarder looks like 
a weightlifting glove, but it's actually a 
device to help cushion your wrists and 
hands against 
carpal tunnel 
syndrome and 
other repetitive- 
stress injuries. 
Simply slip one 
over each hand 
and type away 
at your key- 
board or use 
your mouse with 
comfort. You can choose from a varie- 
ty of colors — even zebra stripes for 
those who want to make a fashion state- 
ment. The gloves are available in 
small, medium, and large sizes; the 
suggested retail price is $19.95 per 
pair or $10.95 per glove. Look for 
Mouse Mitts in selected stores or order 
from Mouse Mitt International, 75 
Green Valley Road, Scotts Valley, Cali- 
fornia 95066; (408) 335-9599, (408) 
335-9598 (fax). 

For Those Kodak Moments 

The new QuickTake 100 from Apple 
Computer is a digital color camera 
that makes it easy to bring photograph- 
ic images to your portable or desktop 
Macintosh or Windows-based comput- 
er without film development or scan- 
ning. The camera features the same 
point-and-shoot simplicity of regular 
"film" cameras and includes the same 
basic functions you would expect: au- 
to exposure, built-in flash, and focus- 
free operation. Within seconds, you 
can download your pictures from the 
camera into standard software applica- 
tions. The suggested retail price is $749. 
Contact Apple Computer, 20525 Mariani 
Avenue, Cupertino, California 95014; 
(800) 776-2333. 




Reinventing the Novel 

The Great American (or British or 
French) Novel only gets better—with 
the advent of CD-ROM technology. Sil- 
icon Alley is working to help pioneer 
the revolution in book publishing with 
interactive novels like No. 11 Downing 
Street. The first episode in a series ti- 
tled The Adventures of Ninja Nanny 
and Sherrloch Sheltie, this humorous an- 
imated tale allows you to interact with 
the main characters; you see what 
they see, and you can even make de- 
cisions for them. 

In the works from Silicon Alley are 
two new interactive novels, Vita and 
The Blue Danube, and another three- 
part series, Warrior Spirit, all with seri- 
ous (more adult) themes that use vid- 
eo and realistic animation. 

For more information, contact Silicon 
Alley, 1850 Union Street, Suite 1511, 
San Francisco, California 94123; (415) 
921-0409, (415) 921-2834 (fax). 

A More Natural DOS? 

If you've never uttered the words Eng- 
lish and DOS in the same sentence, 
this product is for you. Natural Lan- 
guage Solutions has developed Ea- 
syEnglish DOS— its alternative to inflex- 
ible DOS commands and syntax. The 
program allows you to freely form DOS- 
like requests using everyday English 
words and phrases, such as "Add the 
current directory to my path" and 
"Does this directory fit on drive A: or 
B:?" Powered by NLS's proprietary 
SmartLogic artificial intelligence technolo- 
gy, EasyEnglish DOS is an advanced 
natural-language processor that analyz- 
es and understands your ordinary Eng- 
lish so you don't have to memorize cryp- 
tic keywords and syntax. Simply phrase 
your request as if you were speaking to 
a person. The program even expands 
the usual set of DOS commands. For in- 
stance, you can find and manipulate 
files or groups of files (". . . all files 
that end in DOC or TXT except 
OLD. TXT"), get information ("Which 
drive has the most space free?"), and 
much more. Order EasyEnglish DOS for 
$49.95 directly from Natural Language 
Solutions, 166 East 61st Street, Suite 17- 
G, New York, New York 10021; (800) 
327-9868, (212)752-8351. 



Companies, publicists, or public rela- 
tions firms with products or services of 
interest suitable for "News & Notes" 
should send information along with a 
color slide or color transparency to 
News & Notes, Attention: Jill Champion 
Booth, COMPUTE, 324 West Wen- 
dover Avenue, Suite 200, Greensboro, 
North Carolina 27408. O 



SAVES MONEY & ENERGY 
PROTECTS your COMPUTER 

v:.v.v:;:w,v,v,v:.v.^:::.^..., ... , , l ■^^^y■^^^^^^^^T■ ? ^^^^^^ 



TURNS YOUR COMPUTKR ON 



If a Pho ne/Fax/modem call c omes in 
after the call ends 



TURNS YOUR COMPUTKR Ol I 



in REBOOT mode 



TURNS YOUR COMPUTKR Oil 



wh enever the phone rin gs 
after the call ends 



TURNS YOUR COMPUTKR ON 



in MONITOR SA VER mode 



TURNS YOUR COMPU 



if the Keyboard/Mouse stay inactive 
if the Keyboard/Mouse are activated 



includes 

SURGE 

PROTECTION 





Speaking Devices Corporation 
3671 Enochs, Santa Clara, CA 95051 
Tel C408)481-9200 Fax (408)431-9206 



Circle Reader Service Number 329 



BATTERIES 



COMPUTER BATTERIES & MORE 

Sanyo, Tadiren. Panasonic. Eveready, Gales, Lithium. 
Lead Acid, Nl-Cad, Alkaline & Chargers. We Slock 
batteries for laptop/notebook. Camcorders, cordless 
phones, drills, Norelco shavers. RC Cars & invisible 
Fence, Call & ask. Wholesale 1 MC/VI/PO 

Battery Express 

713 Gladstone St., Parkersburg, WV 26101 
1-800-666-2296 Fax: 304-428-2297 



Circle Reader Service Number 344 



BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 



BILL $ 100,000 A YEAR 
THROUGH YOUR COMPUTER 

rREK LOO OH TO OUR BBS A DOWNLOAD DFTALL3 A REFERJR \L3 

BBS 407-547-8759 

WORLD CLASS SOFTWARE, INC SINCE 1981 

245 F.LWA PLACE, WEST PALM BEACH. FU 33405 
407-585-7354 FA\'4ft7-547-|Tfl3 



Circle Reader Service Number 327 



YOU CAN BE A TRAVEL AGENT 



Join the World's Largest Travel Industry as one of our 
associates. Work at home or office, full or part time, travel 
discounts. You'll be the boss. You can be On-Line with 
airlines, hotels, car rentals and more. FUN, PROFITABLE 
& LOW OVERHEAD. Start immediately for only S2500. 



Traveler's Choice Ca " for FREE brochure 
Associates 1-800-446-0096 



Circle Reader Service Number 325 



MISCELLANEOUS 



SKELETON KEY" 




KITS MOST LOCKS 

(bolflackt, dooriocfcs. & some padlock*) 






^ A muri*. Nui 






.inlivd i 



urn--. i>iiK! SmMitcli 
Full Hi-fund: 2 meks dteB*wy. 

To i;i:l lhis fuelling ikrvict-. Sfml Nun ONLY SX.95 + S2 SMI in: 

Salt Marketing " WW. MnnlpmnTy Av NilVOK * KnduiDe \1d 2IK51I . 



CABLE TV 



CABLE TV CONVERTERS 

Why Pay A Htgh Monthly Fee? 
SaveSWO's A Year 



• All Jerrold, Oak, Hamlin, Zenith, 
Scientific Atlanta, and more. 

• 30 Day Money Back Guarantee 

• Shipment within 24 hours 

• VisaJMC andC.O.D. 

No Illinois Orders Accepted 

Purchaser aqret-s lo comply witn all staifc and 

federal laws regarding pnvaie ownership of caDle 

TV equipment Consull local cable operator 



L&L ELECTRONIC ENGINEERING 
1430 Miner Street, Suite 522 
Des Plaines, IL 60016 

Free Catalog 1-800-542-9425 
Information 1 708-540 1106 



Circle Reader Service Number 323 



FREE CATALOG 



CABLE T.V. BOXES - ALL TYPES ' 
LOW PRICES • DEALER PRICES • 



Ace Products 

1-800-234-0726 



Circle Reader Service Number 321 



WHY RENT? 

SAVE! $AVE! 

CABLE TV 
DESCRAMBLERS 

JERROLD • OAK • HAMLIN • ZENITH 
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MASTER CARD • VISA •AMEX'C.O.D. 

FREE COLOR CATALOG ! 

1(800)950-9145 



1470 OLD COUNTRY ROAD, SUITE 315-C 
PLAINVIEW, NY 11803 NO NY SALES 



Circle Reader Service Number 339 

"CABLE TV DESCRAMBLERS 

Converters & Accessories 

STOP RENTING!! 

SAVE MONEY! OWN YOUR EQUIPMENT 

All Major Brand Names • Lowest Prices!! 

FREE 30 Day Trial • FREE CATALOG 

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Circle Reader Service Number 320 



CABLE TV 



• Jerrold® • Oak 

• Zenith • Hamline 

• Tocom • Pioneer 

• Scientific Atlanta 

EXCELLENT PRICES! 



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30 DAY TRIAL • 1 YR. WARRANTY 



VISA MC AMEX DISC COD 



Circle Reader Service Number 338 



COMPUTER SERVICES 



WE CAN FIX MOST COMPUTER/HARDWARE 
PROBLEMS OVER THE PHONE! DON'T BELIEVE 
IT? TRY US: 24 HR. 7 DAY SERVICE 
THE COMPUTER DOCTORS - 800-GET-A-DOC! 



CD-ROM 



SHAREWARE 
& CD's for IBM 

Same Price for 3.5" or 5.25" 
Shipping & Handling: $2/order 
VISA / MASTERCARD /Check / M.O. 
REGULAR ITEMS $1.50 
F-PROTECT SUPERB Virus scanning/cleaning. 
SCAN McAfee's Latest Virus scanner. 

We wfl jMp moil recoil vcrwon avaflablel 

XARGON - EXECUTIONER - KILOBLAST 

NEOPAINT - ANCIENTS - SOLAR WIND 

MEGATRON - OVERKILL - NEVERLOCK 

MAJOR STRYKER-WOLF3D 

BIG ITEMS $2 on DSHD only! 

MONSTER BASH Catacomb Abyss 
GATE WORLD ZONE66 (386 only) 
DARE to DREAM (Windows) 

KENSLAB (386 only) 

DUKE NUKEM II (386, VGA) 

BLAKE STONE 1 (VGA, DOS 5/6, like WOLF3D0 

HALLOWEEN HARRY - By Apogee (386,VGA) 

ANDROID Epic's Pinball Sensation! (386, VGA) 

DOOM Super Wolf3d type (386, VGA,4Mb,HD) $4 

CD's AT GREAT PRICES! 

A few of HUNDREDS of titles available 

PC-SIG 13 $22 WINDOWARE $13 

SWIMWARE 1993 $20 SUPER CLIP ART $13 

Current ShWr 1994 $23 SUPER GAMES-DOS $12 

SUPER GAMES FOR WINDOWS (I or II) $12 

HOLY BIBLE and Christian Shareware $17 

CD-ROM Caddies $4.75 MAYO CLINIC $19 

We have Adult titles: Proof of age required. 

FREE CATALOG ! 
ComPro Software 

248 W. Park Avenue, Suite 356 
Long Beach, NY 11561 

1-800-PC-DISCS 

Circle Reader Service Number 340 



HARDWARE 



COMPUTER TOO OLD? Save Money, Upgrade your 
XT/AT! $149-386/40, $249-486/33. Complete Kit. 
Easy Instructions. 1-800-362-5053. CompuBoost. 
27101 Aliso Crk Rd, #124, Aliso Viejo, CA 92656 



USED COMPUTERS/ MEMORY CHIPS 

AT 

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SIMMS, SIPPS & DRAMS 
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REFURBISHED IBM COMPUTERS FROM $199.00 

REFURBISHED VGA MONITORS FROM $123.00 

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BULK DISKETTES, SOFTWARE 
CD-ROM DRIVES & SOFTWARE 

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FULL WARRANTY ON ALL PRODUCTS 

1-800-831-0163 
ROMCHIP-2 TECHNOLOGIES, INC. 



POSITION WANTED 



HOME TYPISTS, 

PC users needed. 

$35,000 potential. Details. 

Call (1) 805 962-8000 Ext. B-30033 

FINANCIAL SYSTEMS ANALYST. $26,000.00 per 
year. I m mediate opening within rural community hos- 
pital in Elizabelhlon. TN. Will insure that all comput- 
er systems deployed in ihc Information Systems Depart- 
ment are functioning at the optimum levels, and all 
information Systems controls arc met; design, analyze 
and create data base applications for cost accounting 
and statistical purposes and third party contract nego- 
tiations; maintain the network environment and train/ 
assist PC end-users; and provide daily assistance to Ac- 
counting personnel in chart audit/cost accounting 
function. Require Master's in Computer Science or In- 
formation Systems and a graduate record which in- 
cludes successful completion of at least one each three 
(3) semester hour courses in Accounting, Business 
Finance and Statistics. Send resume to Charles Turner. 
Job Service Program & Technical Support, 
TENNESSEE DEPTOF EMPLOYMENT SECURITY. 
505 Market Street. P.O. Box 11088, Chattanooga, TN 
37401-9949, Job Order No. 1475053. 

DATABASE DESIGNER/PROGRAMMER. §23,500.00 
per year. Immediate opening within a firm located in 
Johnson City. Tennessee. Will be responsible for design- 
ing databases for internal and client applications; writ- 
ing database programs for internal and client applica- 
tions; and assisting Network Engineer with installation 
and maintenance of internal and client computer-based 
data networks. Require Master's in Computer Science 
which included at least two semesters of full or part 
time practical experience in the installation and main- 
tenance of computer hardware and the application and 
operation of Novell Netware; both requirements can be 
satisfied with a record of such experience as a gradu- 
ate research assistant in an appropriate M.S. degree pro- 
gram. Send resume to Charles Turner, Tennessee Depl 
of Employment Security, 505 Market Street, Chat- 
tanooga, TN 37401. Job Order No. TN 1475 166. EOE 



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IBM - COMMODORE M & 1 28 - AMIGA 
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EDUCATION 



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USED SOFTWARE 



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EDUCATION 



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NEWS & NOTES 



Jill Champion Booth 



Corel GALLERY 

gives you 

tons of clip art at 

a low cost. 



Objets d'Corel 

It's like browsing through a mu- 
seum — only this art gallery is 
published on a single CD-ROM. 
The appropriately named 
Corel GALLERY is a collec- 
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(with some 6000 of them in col- 
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word-processing and DTP 
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drop the image into place ex- 
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(fax). 

Win a Mansion 

Who hasn't dreamed of own- 
ing a stately mansion? Or of 
winning a wheelbarrowload of 
cash? Now that the national 
penchant for big prizes has ar- 
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could win a mansion or a half 
million in cash — by answering 
trivia questions online. The 
grand-prize winner of COM- 
PUQUEST's Win a Mansion 
contest will choose between 
a 200-year-old mansion val- 
ued at $1 million and 
$500,000 in cash; 98 finalists 
will win cash prizes ranging 








from $500 to $50,000. 

The game plan? Via mo- 
dem (using an 800 number) 
and using the contest's com- 
munications program, you an- 
swer trivia questions from one 
of three categories (you are al- 
lowed to choose): sports, en- 
tertainment, and general knowl- 
edge. Since the Win a Man- 
sion contest uses multi- 
ple-choice questions, "it's like 
playing Jeopardy! with the 
right answer staring you in the 
face," says Win a Mansion's 
creator, Bill Powderly. 

Better hurry, though — the 
deadline for this remarkable 
contest is closing in fast: You 
have until December 31, 
1994, and the contest is lim- 
ited to 60,000 entrants. 

To receive an entry packet 
that includes a game demon- 
stration disk, complete rules, 
and an entry application, 
send your name, address, 
and phone number; the type 
of computer you'll use online 
(DOS or Macintosh); disk size 
(3 1 /2 or 5 1 /i); and a check or 
money order for $7 to cover 
shipping and processing to 
Win a Mansion, 604 Corpo- 
rate Drive West, Langhorne, 
Pennsylvania 19047; (215) 
579-7888. 

Test Your Test Taking 

Planning to take any of the ma- 
jor college entrance exams? 
The SAT/PSAT, LSAT, GMAT, 
or GRE? Then look to Re- 
vieWare from the Princeton Re- 
view, a company known for 
its standardized-test prep 
courses and books. This new 
program is more than just a 
book on disk: You can take a 
sample test (on your comput- 
er) that's as close to the real 
thing as you can get. Re- 
vieWare will also predict your 
score for the actual test and di- 
agnose areas for improve- 
ment. This software is pack- 
aged in book-and-disk edi- 
tions of the Princeton Review 
Test Guides, which include 



complete overviews of each 
test and proven techniques 
for scoring well. Published by 
Villard Books (part of Random 
House), the book-and-disk 
sets are priced at $29.95 
each. Each Test Guide car- 
ries the subtitle With Diagnos- 
tic Tests on Disk. Contact Ran- 
dom House, 400 Hahn Road, 
Westminster, Maryland 21157; 
(800) 726-0600. (Look for an 
online feature on SAT pro- 
grams in the COMPUTE area 
of America Online.) 

Novell Scores Another Coup 

In order to solidify its position 
as a Microsoft rival, Novell has 
acquired both WordPerfect Cor- 
poration and Borland Interna- 
tional's spreadsheet operation 
(pending regulatory approval). 

Primarily a network operat- 
ing system company, Novell 
made headlines in 1991 
when it purchased Digital Re- 
search and put the Novell 
stamp on what had until then 
been called DR DOS. Novell 
DOS 7.0 is now available. 

The WordPerfect purchase 
was a stock swap, sending 
$1.4 billion worth of Novell 
stock into the pockets of John 
Ashton and Bruce Bastian, for- 
mer owners of WordPerfect. 
Borland sold its spreadsheet, 
Quattro Pro, to Novell for 
$145 million in cash. 

Can We Talk? 

Commanding your computer 
by voice is no longer just a 
sci-fi gimmick. Kolvox Commu- 
nications, a leading develop- 
er of speech recognition solu- 
tions, is working with IBM to 
integrate IBM technology into 
a new generation of speaker- 
independent voice interfaces 
for word processing. The Win- 
dows-based VoiceCompan- 
ion for WordPerfect enables 
even newcomers to the soft- 
ware to perform all WordPer- 
fect functions by simply talk- 
ing to the computer using in- 

(continued on page 133) 



136 COMPUTE JUNE 1994 




Since its release, WolfPack T? '* has set a new 
standard for submarine simulations. Winner 
of Tilt Magazine's Tilt D'Or award for best 



"Wolf Pack can only be classified as a genre 
buster, one of those rare games that sets a 
new standard for other releases in the same 
field to live or die by. " 
Video Games & Computer Entertainment 

'The graphics for Wolf Pack are stunning. " 
Wargamer 

WolfPack is now available with 58 new 
missions (70 total) on IBM floppy disk, IBM 
CD-ROM (includes over 5 minutes of 
breathtaking animation sequences) and 
Amiga floppy disk. Coming soon on 
Macintosh floppy disk and CD-ROM. 

You command either a WW2 submarine wolf 
pack or the surface fleet. Historically 
accurate, your weapons and instruments are 
precisely keyed to the war year that you 
choose to play. A full construction set is 
included to allow you to re-create actual 
battles. 

Pick up a copy at your local software store 

and find out what underwater warfare is all 







Circle Reader Service Number 234 



VOLUME ONE NO. 1 



PRO EDITION 




BASBALL 

SEASON 

STARTS TODAY! 



High resolution graphics produce realistic pitcher-batter duels set in 
3-D replicas of 10 top Major League ballparks. 



COLORADO ADMITS TEAM 
M AM ACED DY COMPUTED 



With no general manager in sight, 
the team was forced to admit for 
the last year they've been managed 
by a powerful computer program: 
Front Page Sports Baseball. This 
program has a manage-only mode 
that's great for trying out strategy, 
playing head-to-head with other 
players or against the computer. 
Arcade play lets you control as 



much as you want of pitching, batting, 
fielding and base running at Basic, 
Standard or Advanced skill levels. 
Skill levels can be assigned indepen- 
dently for each activity. During the 
season you can play all the games 
you want, however you want to play 
them, switching from manage-only 
mode to joystick jockey at will. 



WIND W, PITCHERS 



In an amazing game combining 
the effects of high winds and high 
altitude, Colorado and Oakland 
traded home runs, combining for 
a total of 10 round trippers. Eight 
more fly balls were caught at the 
warning track. It could only happen 
in a game like Front Page Sports 
Baseball where temperature, 
humidity, altitude, wind and rain 



are part of the game. You get all the 
unpredictability of Mother Nature. 
You also get all the opportunity to 
display your own skills. Ball flight 
is based on a real physics model so 
where and how far balls are hit is a 
true combination of pitch speed and 
the swing of the bat. The better you 
are. the better your team does. 



FOR SOME IT'S BACK TO MINORS 




That's life in the Major Leagues, and with Front Page Sports Baseball, 
you're making the calls on who to play and who to bench. Field up 
to 30 teams with three divisions per league. With 50 players on each 
team— 25 on the Major League roster, 15 at the AAA level or disabled 
list, and up to 10 in the low minors— you'll work with players not just 
for a season, but from the minors to retirement. 



WHO'S ON FIRST? 

Now from the makers of award-winning 
Football Pro, get the PC baseball game that 
brings you all the action of the Major Leagues. 
To get the complete score, call 1-800 -757-7707 
and ask for offer D835. 



Available July 1994 for IBM PCs and compatibles. 




Officially Licensed by the Major «a'l Players Association, 

and are trademarks of. or licensed to, Dynamix, Inc. 
1994 Dvriainix. All rights reserved. 



Dyi 



PART OF THE SIERRA FAMILY